Pro render Poll


#1

Hi there,

I am not jet sure what to think about Pro render. Therefor I thought I make a poll and look what you guys think about it:

If you have ideas for other questions, just post them :slight_smile:

  • I use Prorender regularly
  • I sometimes use Prorender
  • I hardly use it
  • I never use it

0 voters

  • It feels like a competitive GPU renderer
  • It feels acceptable for a GPU renderer
  • With maxons development it will soon get a good solution
  • I do not have hope, that it will ever get competitive

0 voters

prorender is good in:

  • textures
  • speed
  • usability
  • features
  • exteriour
  • interiour
  • image quality

0 voters

prorender is bad in:

  • textures
  • speed
  • usability
  • features
  • exteriour
  • interiour
  • image quality

0 voters


#2

Won’t touch it until it runs on nvidia cards on OSX.


#3

Is that ever going to happen? Apple Metal would need to support nVidia for that. Mac OSX Mojave doesn’t support Cuda or nVidia cards at all right now (even through eGPU)


#4

I still have hope! Might give ProRender a go if I get around to buying a Vega 64 for my Mac Pro.


#5

Though it looks like having a c4d native c4d GPU render engine is a great idea, I will not touch it until its actually 100% production ready for animation.


#6

I have some hope speed will increase a bit - I’ve seen AMD denoising tech in the Blender ProRender plugin. Maxon needs to get that to C4d ASAP!


#7

Literally could not care less about it.

OpenCL and Metal support doesn’t mean anything to me when I currently use CUDA and am looking to switch to PC in the near future. It sounds like OpenCL is dead, which only really leaves Metal as being the “benefit” of ProRender, which I guess is great if you’re on a Mac but considering how Apple has been treating professionals lately…

I kinda wish MAXON would have just licensed Arnold or something. They seem to be sinking an awful lot of time and effort into a renderer that doesn’t even do realistic hair or skin yet or have a strong AOV system. Maybe it’s good for motion graphics, I dunno… From my point of view, I haven’t had a single reason to try ProRender and the only thing I seem to read about these days are reasons not to use it.

-CMPX


#8

I can’t work with it since is not available for Prime users (which I consider a weird move from Maxon)


#9

Is it true that The Foundry have also chosen it as the GPU renderer for Modo?


#10

I tried to give it a shot a couple of months back, thinking that it could be a good solution for my iMac Pro with built-in Vega 64 with the added benefit that I could in the future add an extra AMD egpu for added performance…

Unfortunately I found that Prorender wasn’t as responsive as I’d hoped when interactively adjusting elements in my scene, such as material qualities and light positions etc., and for me that kind of defeats the object of using a GPU renderer in the first place. Admittedly I didn’t test Prorender extensively, but to me it seemed that render speed isn’t much (if at all) faster than C4D physical, and long render times were required to get rid of noise.

IMO, Mac users like myself who want GPU rendering face a bit of a dilemma right now. It appears that Apple are not only NOT supporting Nvidia GPUs (whether internal or external), but they seem to actively be blocking the user from using them… As someone mentioned in a reply above, Mojave doesn’t actually even support Cuda. So there is definitely a place for a decent GPU renderer that runs on AMD GPUs, but unfortunately I don’t think Prorender is quite there yet.

For the time being I’m sticking with Redshift on my (single) eGPU running under High Sierra. It’s so much better than Prorender in it’s current state.

Someone above mentioned something about the way in which Apple have been treating professionals lately… In my opinion it’s true that Apple failing to support Nvidia GPUs and the lack of any decent GPU renderer for AMD GPUs will push (and has already pushed) many people like myself into ditching their Apple workstations for Windows systems… It’s something I’ve been thinking about and, if things continue the way they are now, it’s something I will have to do whether I like it or not. It seems to me that when Apple talk about pro users, they mean video and photo editors. 3D, CG, VFX (or whatever you want to call it) is more of a niche area… Think of industries such as engineering, science etc… these are ‘pro’ industries, yet I wouldn’t expect that Apple have a great presence in those fields… maybe I’m wrong, just my opinion…


#11

Holy shit this is so bad . . . I was confused at first thinking the after denoising were in fact the before picture. That explains the horribly noisy interiors on AMD Prorender gallery. Nvidia Optix denoiser is miles ahead.


#12

I 100% agree with Laurent. This is not production ready. At all.


#13

Well, you guys are helping me decide things. I was just about to order a Vega 64 and sonnet eGPU to use with Prorender as I stayed up way too late fiddling with render tests. I feel like ProRender was significantly more responsive than working with Standard or Physical’s global illumination on my 4 core/8 thread iMac. But it also sounds like Redshift/Cycles/Octane are significantly more responsive than ProRender. I have zero experience with CUDA based engines.

Sounds like I need to bite the bullet and do eGPU with Nvidia or just jump ship entirely to Windows.

Now I just need to figure out heat inside a PC case. Blower style 20XX series cards are hard to find. Well, all the 20XX series are hard to find and reports of 2080 ti failures are popping up. :disappointed:


#14

I’m not sure if Octane on Mac is worth the effort. It’s been flaky for years. Then the 4.x releases were quite stable, but now they’re flaky again. C4D with Octane crashes more than any other app or plugin I run on my Mac Pro (although I’ve been having weird things with my GPU - with a basically empty scene I’m running out of memory and getting Render Fail!, so no idea what’s going on). Anyway I’ve just sidelined it and use Physical Render and cheat wherever I can. ProRender is a non-event for Mac/Nvidia users.


#15

Yeah, prorender not working with nVidia on the Mac makes it worse, and you aren’t the first person to mention Octane instability on the Mac. Dang.

I am so darn frustrated with my computer choice. I don’t do C4d for a living. But I want to integrate it into my job so I must learn on my own to prove it to my bosses. My Mac purchase is looking more and more like a very bad investment for C4D. That drives me nuts, as I thought Apple eGPU support was going to save the day.

Oh well, lesson learned. Again. Buy what works today, not what might work sometime in the future with empty promises from Apple.

Perhaps one day I’ll stop letting my love of using a Mac burn me.


#16

At the risk of veering off-topic, I’m in the same boat. Been clinging to my ageing (but brilliant) Mac Pro since 2010. Then thought - with R20 and ProRender, I could add an iMac Pro to my setup, so I get two screens and additional CPU rendering, plus an AMD GPU. But I got cold feet and thought – just maybe – we’d see glimpse of the new Mac Pro yesterday. But no dice, so it’s truly a 2019 release. But when in 2019? I wish I’d gone with the iMac Pro now…


#17

@Darth_Mole

My feeling was/is that any new Mac Pro would be a long way off… perhaps even 2020, even if it is announced in 2019. So I went and replaced my Mac Pro 2010 with an iMac Pro…

@BubblegumDimension
Personally I wouldn’t be so frustrated with that iMac… I’ve been using an iMac in my work place connected to a sonnet breakaway and 1080ti with redshift and it’s been a pretty good performing machine.


#18

Not to derail but I don’t expect Pro Render to ever support CUDA (unless MAXON decides to walk away from Mac and create their own version of it). No idea what the licensing is but fundamentally it’s an AMD technology. And I do expect others to follow Otoy’s lead and start building Metal implementations (more on why below). There seems to be less resistance to this than there was for OpenCL a few years back. Maybe developers feel the resources available are better and the API itself is better / can help them build better apps?

Meanwhile NVIDIA has been all mixed signals as to whether they intend to issue Mojave-compatible drivers (either beta style “web drivers” like they supply for 10.13.x, or something officially sanctioned by Apple). In one breath they claim to be “working on it,” in another they claim it’s 100% up to Apple that they “make all the drivers” (which is bullsh^t), and in others they claim they are “trying” but Apple makes it “too difficult.” Apple for their part, does what they always do — total silence.

Meaning, don’t hold your breath for unofficial or official Mac drivers for 10.14+ from NVIDIA. Even eGPU appears that it’s becoming an AMD-only game for Mac users, despite an active community of individual programmers trying to hack their way to an NVIDIA-on-Mac solution. It’s pretty funny listening to NVIDIA employees talk about how “closed” Apple is, when all NVIDIA does is obfuscate the current status of things, and continues pushing the (free-but-proprietary) CUDA agenda regardless of other opportunities for cooperation that may exist.

The more I watch this space the more I understand why Apple said “F this” (knowing OpenCL would never work well on NVIDIA GPUs), and built their own modern API to handle both 3D and compute. My belief now is that short-term AMD will be the only GPU solution for Macs running Mojave or later. Long-term I suspect Apple will design their own desktop class GPUs (custom PCBAs, not standard PCIe cards) which will be fabricated by TSMC and be highly optimized for Metal. Looking at the new iPad Pro capabilities we’re probably closer than we think to a shipping desktop product. Maybe the Mac Pro Next will be the first Mac with an Apple GPU, where you can plug in more than one to satisfy the Mac Pro upgrade crowd. In that case we’re probably looking at late 2019 best case but it would be interesting. I could see Apple doing something like that in about 2.5 years time (since we found out about the new direction early 2017 I think).

All this increasingly makes sense to me, in light of increasing importance of 3D, AR, VR, AI, ML and what Apple wants to do with those things. Anything that gives them more control and a better quality product, they’ll do. And the iPad Pro shows some evidence they could make it a material reality.

[To be fair someone else mentioned this idea a few months ago and I wasn’t very receptive to it, but the more I’ve read and watched things “evolve,” the more sense it makes.]


#19

ProRender is not a good deal for me (mac pro GC radeon 7950).
It’s not ProRender but SlowRender.

On mac, you must buy a lot of things to get a decent GPU renderer.
I prefer a CPU renderer like Corona.


#20

@Benek Which iMac Pro model did you go for – and what kind of performance are you getting?