I'm developing new 2D vector graphics software inspired by 3D modeling and sculpting techniques. Any thoughts?


#1

Hello everyone!

I hope this is a good place to share this. I am an indie developer with previous experience working at Pixar Animation Studios in their R&D team, and I’m now building a new kind of vector graphics software where the paths you draw can have shared edges, and where you can intuitively sculpt them.

It’s sort of a hybrid between 2D software and how 3D modeling and sculpting works. Like Adobe Illustrator meets 3D modeling meets ZBrush.

shared-edges-intro-01-24fps

shared-edges-others-01-24fps

topological-operators-01-24fps

glue-01-3-24fps

glue-02-24fps

sculpt-01-24fps

depth-ordering-02-24fps

depth-ordering-01-24fps

If you want, you can test it out by downloading the free prototype at https://www.vpaint.org

I’m super curious to hear what the community think about it. Any feedback?

Thanks!


#2

Hi, is interesting your software, but yet don’t understand if is 3D really or 2D manipulation. Are you using opengl, DirectX or only vector manipulation?


#3

Hi kybio, it’s all only 2D manipulation!

The rendering is actually done using OpenGL, but only in 2D, there is no Z coordinate in the data. So it’s a list of 2D shapes stacked on top of others, like in Adobe Illustrator, except that it’s based on a data structure using vertices/edges/faces similar to what you can do in 3D modeling software. Though unlike 3D polygonal meshes, each “edge” is not necessarily a straight edge, it can be any curve going from one vertex to another vertex, and you can intuitively sculpt this curve.

I hope it makes sense!


#4

Sounds like the grease pencil in Blender :slight_smile:


#5

Thanks for commenting! It’s a common question that I have, but in fact it’s very different from the Grease Pencil :wink:

With the Grease Pencil, each stroke is a curve in 3D space, and they are all independent from one another.

With VGC Illustration, each stroke is a curve in 2D space, and they can be connected to one another. For example, two strokes can share their end point, and you can edit this end point as one vertex. And you can use the paint bucket to fill a closed area delimited by connected strokes.

So to summarize:

Grease Pencil : 3D strokes, not connected
VGC Illustration: 2D strokes, connected

There really is no 3D in VGC Illustration, it’s a 2D Canvas like in Adobe Illustrator :slight_smile: