When to finally call it Quits?


#1

How do you know when Computer Graphics just isn’t for you? Is it when you spend countless hours modelling what you think will be a high security prison facility only to have it turn out like a box with a couple cylinders around it? Or is it when you spend day & night starring at your 3D program, contemplating what to try and make next? When do you just call it quits?


#2

You need to learn the program first. If you still don’t like doing CG after learning the program, well then – CG might not be for you. Do you LOVE CG? Can you see yourself doing it professionally in the future? These are the questions that you need to ask yourself.


#3

I’m seriously fascinated when I watch movies like Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within and Monsters Inc. It inspires me to want to become a CG artist…but it seems so tidius to learn where all of the controls are in a program. I think my problem is the fact that I’m diving right into modeling/animation and I haven’t really explored the program to see what it offers. Like I said, it just seems so tidius.


#4

Originally posted by rapidarp
I think my problem is the fact that I’m diving right into modeling/animation and I haven’t really explored the program to see what it offers. Like I said, it just seems so tidius.

Which program are you trying to learn? You must have patience. Art is ALL ABOUT patience. Also: Do you have a strong foundation in the fundamentals? drawing, color theory, composition, etc?


#5

Originally posted by rapidarp
When do you just call it quits?

When they pry the mouse out of my cold dead hands!:smiley:


#6

If you think that learning a program is tedious, wait until you’ve been working on the same production for months, and the clients are still making up their minds about what they want the characters/environment/animation to look like. Endless changes of the same thing over and over and over again.

It’s enough to drive anyone mad :argh:

Seriously, learning the program is the least of your worries. You have to learn solid techniques - the theory behind everything. That’s how you understand the hows, whys, whats and whens. That’s where the hard work begins. The controls in a program are the way of translating those techniques into something practical.

I think the question you really have to be asking yourself is this: is it really worth working your ass off and spending the rest of your life in a certain career just because you thought that something in a movie looked cool? :shrug:

At the same time, don’t rush. If you’re serious about this, then take your time and do it properly. Everyone who tries to do too much too quickly ends up despondent.


#7

Originally posted by Leigh
Seriously, learning the program is the least of your worries. You have to learn solid techniques - the theory behind everything.

Why should he worry about technique and ‘the theory behind everything’ if he doesn’t even know the UI? :stuck_out_tongue: First things first…

“is it really worth working your ass off and spending the rest of your life in a certain career just because you thought that something in a movie looked cool?”

You don’t have to spend the rest of your life doing any one thing.


#8

Originally posted by Cinematography
Why should he worry about technique and ‘the theory behind everything’ if he doesn’t even know the UI? First things first…

I didn’t say he should learn techniques before learning the UI :surprised
I said that if he’s having trouble already, then when it gets to learning techniques and theory, then he’s going to have an even tougher time.
I thought that the “that’s where the hard work begins” part would have made that quite clear :wink:

You don’t have to spend the rest of your life doing any one thing.

True, but most people do.
Especially if they focus on only one thing when they are young, leaving them nothing to fall back on should they wish to change their career later in life. I’m not saying this is the case here, but for most people this is true.


#9

Originally posted by Leigh
I said that if he’s having trouble already, then when it gets to learning techniques and theory, then he’s going to have an even tougher time.

Not necessarily. The first steps are usually the hardest, especially if it’s for something that you know absolutely nothing about. But once you get a momentum started, everything else can, and usually does fall into place.


#10

if its not fun to you then its not fun
i dont do anything creatively anymore but the whole aspect of learning the applications have became my sole intrest
just kick back,take a breather,learn your tools,dont set any goals for yourself,just learn everything you can then when that creative feeling comes to you agian you may be able to handle it better
just dont waste your time if youre not having fun or if the intrest isnt there


#11

Is this something you’re approaching or interested in primarily as a hobby? Do you have any previous entanglements, experience, activities with art? (do you have any artistic skills?)

For a hobby interest you’ll probably find that if you find it tedious then it’s not going to hold your interest for long especially if you have no real art or cad skills. You gotta be a tweak freak of sorts for this stuff.

If it doesn’t hold your interest past the hobby stage then forget about atttempting it for an occupation.

just my 2 cents.


#12

having had a lot of training in acting and music some time back, i saw/had a lot of the same questions and anxiety over going pro that i see people posting on the boards about here.

what teachers and pros you’d talk to would always say was, “well, if you have anything else you could possibly be happy doing, go do that instead.” i think the same thing holds true for cg or any competitive industry. it’s so difficult to get into and hard once you’re in it, it doesn’t make sense to do unless it’s the only thing you can see yourself being happy doing, know what i mean?

not trying to be discouraging or anything, it’s just that as chewie says everything depends on how badly and in what capacity you want to be doing this stuff.


#13

Originally posted by Cinematography
Not necessarily. The first steps are usually the hardest, especially if it’s for something that you know absolutely nothing about. But once you get a momentum started, everything else can, and usually does fall into place.

I didn’t say it was harder, I’m talking about this in respect to tediom - if he finds learning the program tedious, he’s going to find learning techniques even worse. The author of this thread has made no comments about having difficulty with the actual process, he’s complaining that he finds it tedious, and I’m basing my comments on this factor, not a factor of skill.

Read posts a little more carefully before arguing with them :wink:


#14

Gadzooks!

Is learning software really THAT boring for you? I personally love discovering new tools and ways to get something done. It’s really satisfying being able to say “right, today I learnt how to implement Global Illumination into my pipeline”. Don’t you get that same buzz?

It’s not about the software. As has been said countless times, it’s all about the theory. The software is simple a means to an end. You have to learn the practical theory behind your method to understand WHY something works.

My advice: just get some reference images and play, play, play. Seeing as you are not in the position of having to choose a particular path in the industry, just relax and have fun. I wish I was still at your stage. I had a great time playing around in various packages, learning what everything does. Now it’s all work work work.

Trust me, relax and enjoy yourself. Dtop worrying about it and do it!

Oh another thing. Modelling is usually a good place to start if you’re looking to go into CG. That said, you should already be at least confident in sketching and composition.

So grab a pen, some paper, sketch a character and start pulling polys!

PS. There will come a point where you know the tools and you no longer have to learn techniques. It will all become about the BEST way of getting something done… Problem solving etc.

ENJOY! Art is about expression and FUN. A reflection of life. It needn’t be so methodical and “tedious”.


#15

Originally posted by mothermachine
It needn’t be so methodical and “tedious”.

While this is true, it can even be taken further by some logical twisting - how to find a method to avoid the tedium…

Honestly, there are times when certain things get really boring and tedious - but they can be ironed out, with a little practice, by recognising in advance what particular tasks tend to become boring.

So, try to identify exactly what it is that makes it tedious, then try to do a little bit of that mixed with the not-so-tedious tasks rather than saving it for later, forcing you to do a whole lot of boring work in one single lump.


#16

Leigh,
Mentally replace the word ‘hardest’ with ‘most tedious’ in my last statement so that it can become the point I was trying to make. :cool:


#17

Originally posted by JamesMK
[B]While this is true, it can even be taken further by some logical twisting - how to find a method to avoid the tedium…

Honestly, there are times when certain things get really boring and tedious - but they can be ironed out, with a little practice, by recognising in advance what particular tasks tend to become boring.

So, try to identify exactly what it is that makes it tedious, then try to do a little bit of that mixed with the not-so-tedious tasks rather than saving it for later, forcing you to do a whole lot of boring work in one single lump. [/B]

I think this is a case where you’re trying to use a “spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down”.

Trying to convince someone who tells you they don’t like the flavor of haggis isn’t going to be convinced it’s delicious just because you think it is and tell him that it’s so.

He’s clearly bored with the process and seems to have just experienced a momentary jones/interest spurred (as many have been) by 3DCG laden feature films to see what this 3D stuff is all about. Given the amnount of info he’s provided so far, I’d recommend moving on.


#18

You know what, Chewey? I think you’re probably right.

I just can’t seem to let people lose their hope :slight_smile:


#19

Just my opinion. Sometimes I think it’s better that people get some frank advice and not the “fanboy” blather about “you gotta follow your dream, bro.”


#20

Re: Chewey.

I followed my dream - PREPARE TO BE BOARDED!!! HAR HAR-HAR!!!:twisted:

Indeed.:wise:

Re: Rapidarp.

Anyway. I’m spending 2 weeks holiday learing Maya. ARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG!!!

The only way through is to do simple-child-like exercises first. And keep doing them - then maybe move onto something new - then have aother go at an old exercise…in the vain hope it clicks…

Its a complete bugger - but I’ll shall pull through the victor because I’m gonna keep at it…

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