What the heck is up w/DELL?!!!


#1

I have a Dell PC and recently wanted to see if I could upgrade my processor. First I called Dell to see how much of an upgrade I could get w/the machine that I had. As it turned out I could upgrade my machine from the current P4 2.6 GHz to a 3.06 w/HT, which I’ve been drooling over for months. So when I ask the guy, who I could barely understand by the way, how much it would cost me, he said, $846USD. So I’m like, “What the heck do mean $846!!” This processor is $219 at the most on newegg. When I asked why they were asking so much, he said that the processor is especially for my computer. Are these guys full of it or am I? This is the same chip, same specs, same everything!! Why are they charging so much $$$? Has this happened to anyone else? What did you do? Why does Dell do that? And if I buy the processor myself and install it myself, which I am very capable of doing by the way, is it gonna ruin my machine? I’m kinda nervous now b/c I’m wondering if the machine is configured in a way that if I do change the processor myself it will be ruined.


#2

while i don’t have an answer for you, i’m really curious to see what comes out of this discussion. It’s info like this that would prevent me from EVER buying a Dell.

I can’t imagine that installing the processor yourself could do any damage. Unless of course it was installed incorrectly, but the processor itself should be fine. Anyone else?

Rob


#3

Well, from my understanding, the Dell uses off the shelf components. You should be able to buy a processor as long as it is supported by your MB. In the past, when I had a Dell, I had to purchase everything through them. Also, I just checked with our IT director and she said that any processor would work as long as the MB supports it. Hope this helps you out!

GAMEFAN


#4

well, buy an OEM processor…it’ll fit fine, and no need to worry about the heatsink, as the one you already have should do the trick just fine:)


#5

Yepyep. I’ve upgraded plenty of Dell system CPU’s. The only thing to be careful is making sure the chipset actually supports the CPU. The other part is just keeping the new CPU cool since the Dell HSF usually cannot do that great of a job with higher temp CPU’s. Oh, the Dell BIOS usually doesn’t have any controls to change clock speed but they usually do well in automatically detecting any new CPU’s and its speed.

Dell usually does not publish the wide variety of upgrades that are possible for their systems because they would of course prefer you to buy another one of their systems. There is little to no documentation with regards to upgrading CPU’s. The funniest thing that happened to me was when I upgraded my Dell GX110 at work to a 1GHz CPU. One of the site tech’s was Dell certified, and had been for quite some time. I told him about the upgrade and his jaw just sort of dropped: “Those things are upgradeable???” … @.@


#6

Well, C, that’s exactly my point GAMEFAN. All the hardware they use is stuff you can buy on the net for a fraction of what dell is selling it 4 and u have people out there who don’t know any better spending hundreds of dollars on upgrades w/these people and honestly, it’s str8 up robbery. I’ve had my dell for a couple of years now; It’s not the machine I have a problem w/it’s this one aspect of how dell does business that really sets me off.


#7

U know what thanx alot cuz that was the one issue that was also troubling me…Dell sells this so called “Kit” w/all the intel upgrades. It’s supposed to include a new sink and a couple of other insignificant nick-nacks. But for a 600 dollar mark up, it’s just unfair.


#8

The only thing you have to worry about is the warranty. I know Dell is always bragging about its tech support and repair/replacement plans and warranties and all of that junk, but on alot of PC’s, opening the case and changing the parts voids your warranty. Where as having someone at Dell do it doesnt. That is, if you’re still within the manufacturer’s warranty in the first place.

Just thought Id add that into consideration.


#9

Huh, that’s quite a ripoff. Just buy the OEM chip and install it yourself. Especially if your warantee has already expiered as doing an upgrade like that is almost sure to void it.

Last time I dealt with Dell spare parts (a year ago, for laptop bits) their prices were pretty good. I got a then close-to-top-of-the-line laptop graphics card for under $200


#10

anytime, abie1:)


#11

This processor should be ok, but Dell doesn’t have the reputation they used to for off the shelf components. Often you can find customized MB’s, power supplys, hell my current graphics card is radeon 9700 tx, a card dell designed with ati to be clocked down so it can handle teh smaller power supply.

Dell’s support however, is just as good as ever. It just may become more likely that you’ll need it when something goes wrong. Dell essentially is the new Compaq in my opinion. They are great for those who don’t want to think about computers. I would still recommend them for that purpose, but no other.


#12

totally agree with you, . . . Abie1, some company get their extra income by doing this. but they don;t realized they just lure teh customer even further away! . . .

lets any dell rep, read this thread!!!

regards,
rw


#13

watch out for dell. all of their stuff, as far as i can tell, is propriatized. i recently replaced my video card with one that i got from my friend, i was downright disturbed to see how my computer was built. the only fan, which sucked out of my computer, was ducted over my processor, which i later found out, only has a heatsink, and a crappy one at that. no wonder my system is sluggish.
I looked at my motherboard and lo and behold! not atx or even close to atx! i was temporarily baffled at how the AGP slot held the card down so firmly, so i had to force the card out and then look at it. there is approximately, oh, maybe 4 square inches of totally unused PCB on my motherboard. i have no idea why. Dell motherboard also happen to lack a fan connector other than the 1 used for the rediculously large, slow, and innefficient fan that barely cools anything. i wouldnt be all that surprised to learn that they have a custom socket that will (intentionally, no doubt) fry any other CPU.


#14

i have 2 dell pcs and a dell laptop at home and i really cant complain about them. sure i do have other pcs (from stores or self-assembled) but dell pcs are the best piece of hardware ive used so far, when you look at the price. ibm and other big companies may be even better, but there are also more expensive (the ibm thinkpad’s rock though :wink:

the dell mainboard is somewhat strange, agreed, especially in those small optiplex series the machines interior looks really strange and non-standard, but i have 2 dimensions (a pretty new one and a 2 year old one) and i had no trouble updating/replacing hardware so far, but on the other hand i never tried the cpu. but i guess that should not be a problem as well.

if youre someone who likes to update and tune his pc a lot dell is not the company to go with. but the way i see it you buy a pc, use it for a certain time span, and then not only the cpu but the rest is so outdated as well that you might as well buy a new pc. i use my old workstation for internet/photoshop only and my new for maya only, i could have upgraded, but then id have a good cpu and graphics adapter lying around, unused, which would have been a shame.


#15

When I had a Sony vaio PC, I needed RAM. The service guy I called wanted to charge me $500.00 for the RAM. Next day I went out and got the RAM I needed for like $150.00. The PC works fine, same with Videocard, Processor/Fan and Hard Drives.

This is something companys do to make more money, makes a lot too :stuck_out_tongue:

I would go out and get the processor at a store and put it in myself. But I would buy a new fan as well.


#16

Welcome to the world of Dell Computers!!!

hahahah

its almost as bad as apple’s ludicrously over priced RAM for their new G5’s its like 4 times the price for fairly average CAS3 3200 Ram.

ahhh well thats what you get with pre-built stuff generally.


#17

C this is exactly what I’m talking about; there should be somebody that regulates this type of stuff. If I didn’t know that I could go out and by own stuff, I’d just pay for it thinking I was a getting a good deal. I think it’s deceptive and unfair. But of course, someone might say, is the world we live in; go figure.

[/QUOTE]This is something companys do to make more money, makes a lot too :p[/QUOTE]
Too much money, I think.

[/QUOTE]I would go out and get the processor at a store and put it in myself. But I would buy a new fan as well.[/QUOTE]
What name brand heatsink fan do you have or which ones can anyone recommend.

[/QUOTE]totally agree with you, . . . Abie1, some company get their extra income by doing this. but they don;t realized they just lure teh customer even further away! . . .

lets any dell rep, read this thread!!!

[/QUOTE]
Hey ru what’s up, check your messegases. N E Ways, I think this is ridiculous and by the size of this thread, I don’t think that I’m the only one; I really do wish a dell rep would read this. On the other hand, don’t get me wrong, as I said b 4, I love my machine, it’s the ridiculousy insane price to upgrade ANYTHING w/dell that I hate.


#18

i will be honest with you. there is nothing to drool over. the difference between a 3ghz and a 2.6 is so small that you will barely feel any change. between the 2.4 ghz workstation i got at home, my 3ghz laptop, and the dual xeon 3ghz at work, theres so little difference that isnt worth spending all the extra cash for.

i would rather spend that money on useful stuff like maxing out your ram, fast hard drive/s, decent scanner, etc. stuff that in the longterm will make much more of a difference than a measly cpu upgrade.


#19

Wasn’t this the way Packard Bell was run?


#20

don’t you know it’s blasphemous sacrelige to speak that awful name here!!

almost as bad as saying Macbeth in a theatre…:smiley: