Watercolor-like techniques?


#1

I’m curious if anyone knows of any techniques to render out a watercolor look or possibly any plugins to accomplish such a affect. I realise to a certain extent rendering out maps and post processing them or the entire scene could accomplish similar results of what i’m thinking of however this would require a ridiculous amount of time and there would be no room for mistakes and certain objects and colors wouldn’t blend together properly. I’m looking at this from a straight render/procedural approach(although I can still see room for full scene post processing at once to enhance other effects). If anyone could share any such techniques with me it would be appreciated as it would save me the time of having to write a plugin to do this. (I pray for the day lightwave will have a nodal shader authoring scheme with programable components like maya/xsi)


#2

For those other people out there like myself who love stylized renderings and non-photoreal looks here is a great link http://www.red3d.com/cwr/npr/ about all the information on NPR techniques you’d ever want to try and digest. Awesome resource for inspiration and those shader/plugin writers out there.


#3

kind of like what PDI did in their short Fishing… I’ve always wondered if there was a way to achieve this in LightWave


#4

http://www.francesdose.com/arnie/lw_notebooknpr.htm

thats Arnie Chachliens(sp) page and it discusses, in depth, various techniques…some are very cool, so you might check it out. and they are all out of the box techniques

-Todd


#5

Originally posted by twidup
[B]http://www.francesdose.com/arnie/lw_notebooknpr.htm

thats Arnie Chachliens(sp) page and it discusses, in depth, various techniques…some are very cool, so you might check it out. and they are all out of the box techniques

-Todd [/B]

Thanks for the link however I was all ready aware of this site for when I was out link hunting on google for lightwave npr and watercolor info. I’ve solutions for a lot of npr rendering styles for lightwave hatching/outlining/cel/other still lacking any kind of solid info on Watercolor style in lightwave. Right now i’m messing around doing some experimenting with no luck at the moment. If I make any progress I’ll be sure to post an image. For now I hope we can run into someone who’s accomplished such an effect in LW =)


#6

Originally posted by JVitale
[B]kind of like what PDI did in their short Fishing… I’ve always wondered if there was a way to achieve this in LightWave

http://www.pdi.com/shorts/fishing.htm [/B]

Thanks much for the link it’s actually providing some great information. I noticed on the credits the shading/sylization was done by Cassidy Curtis I went straight to google started search for Cassidy Curtis along with various npr/cg/3d keywords and found a wealth of technical information on acheiving such techniques. (All very technial mind you but will be useful if I have to write a plugin to get what I want)


#7

I wonder if the old legacy plugin Pennelo Lite (LW 4.0, Xaos tools) would get you part of the way there. I’m a traditional artist, and would love to be able to do sketch/watercolour work through Lightwave.
It would be cheaper than printing out animation layers on inkjet frame by frame, then going at it with a spray bottle! :annoyed:


#8

KenM that’s an interesting suggestion I haven’t been able to find any information on that plugin though and I can almost guarentee a plugin that old would be incompatable with the current system.


#9

It is incompatible. Although I might install LW 4 and work LW7.5 images though it as a filter.

Before I go that far, I have an idea of trying to connect motion information with cel shading, using the special buffers and/or buffer savers. A foggy idea taking shape at the moment is to access the motion blur buffers, filter them to look like watercolour or even flat color, then put that through some sort of textured filter to randomize the edges. Then comp somewhat blobby edge tracing on top of that, then texturize the images.

Trying to get a computer to paint outside the lines is tough work, but could look beautiful. :wink:


#10

KenM, something along those lines could produce some interesting results would be worth a try but I don’t think it would appear very water color-like. With your comment on edges well it’s super easy to acheive a “Loose and Sketchy” outline look using only the depth buffer(Z) image as a referance and having it render strokes around it based on depth(you could have it paint outside the area as well easy enough). Would probably be cake to write a plugin to do that I just need to get as much detailed info I can on writing shaders for lightwave first or find some non compiled lscript shaders (or have any code for a LW shader as reference for that matter) . LW noob at the moment so it’s APIs/Scripting is foreign at the moment. I"m sure to pick it up. (The Lscript documentation I found was very breif on shaders(practically non existant info))


#11

I did try pennello pro on some stuff once, to see about giving it a painted look. it worked ok, but we couldnt get results that were usable, it just looked wierd animated


#12

Posting to bump this up for one last reach out see if this can be done without getting to serious. I have all ready started planning a plugin I think either way I’m going to work on this project and write a full NPR plug solution for lightwave for various styles (minus Cel shading if you need Cel shading the japanese UnReal plugin is the way to go) Should be a fun project to learn lightwave programming interfaces. However if anyone out there knows ways to produce some good Non-Photoreal styles (even aside from water color feel free to reply as well)


#13

Haven’t used it but the Worley G2 plugin seems to have some painterly effects possible, or it appears so looking in the Gallery on the web site.

Keep Wavin’:wavey:


#14

Originally posted by CTRL+X
[B]Haven’t used it but the Worley G2 plugin seems to have some painterly effects possible, or it appears so looking in the Gallery on the web site.

Keep Wavin’:wavey: [/B]

Well, that’s a very basic effect being acheived there not much different than a texture map with different surface/projection properties. It’s done by providing an image so there is no brush stroking/coloring based on geometry.

edit:
edited with more accurate info.


#15

I pulled this using the Unreal edge tracer and wavefilter. I also exported a technical-pen-style render, to drive saturation with. Good luck with your custom shader, it would definately fill a niche.

LW pigment test


#16

Originally posted by KenM
[B]I pulled this using the Unreal edge tracer and wavefilter. I also exported a technical-pen-style render, to drive saturation with. Good luck with your custom shader, it would definately fill a niche.

LW pigment test [/B]

That’s a very nice look you have going there. Would you mind to run down a step-by-step I’m sure others may be interested. (or at least the wavefilter settings?)


#17

…and adding Courtjester’s Gmil Approach :

Swank - why, thank you. I’ll type up a step by step over the next 1/2 hr or so.


#18

Originally posted by KenM
[B]…and adding Courtjester’s Gmil Approach :

Swank - why, thank you. I’ll type up a step by step over the next 1/2 hr or so. [/B]

Wow ok those results are awesome. Very impressive indeed. Thanks a ton for your input on this =) :thumbsup:


#19

Welcome to this short tutorial. Swank posed a question about non-photoreal rendering (NPR), and being a traditional artist myself, I am very interested in this idea. Below is a summary of the steps I developed trying to get Lightwave to paint outside the lines.

Surface Settings
I checked out some of the links provided in this thread, and one in particular,
Computer-Generated Watercolour . On page ten is a multiple-pass process which looks alot like glazing (layering transparent washes). So, my first step was to create a shader that approximated that look:
right-click save as - watercolour 001 surface

1. object color 232 236 159 (pale yellow ‘wash’ - under ‘T’ texture I then created several surface layers to (hopefully) emulate darker glazes and pigment sedimention:

layer 1, opacity 80.5% - gradient with bump as input channel.

  • gradient step 1 - pale blue, alpha 86.5%;
  • step 2 - slightly darker blue, alpha 91%, parameter 0.22;
  • step 3 - saturated pure blue, alpha100%, parameter 1.0 - the idea here is to have darker pigment on the bump map’s 'hills, and less, lighter blue in the ‘valleys’. I inverted the keys to see if I liked the inverse more - sort of emulating dry brushing and wet brushing.

layer 2, opacity 78% - a procedural alpha, to break up the blue glaze I just laid down and let some original yellow show through. Dented procedural, scale 1.25, power .79, scale XYZ at 5cm (well, size it relative to your object).

layer 3, opacity 20%, gradient, input parameter “slope” - a wash of light yellow graduating to orange. Cassidy Curtis appears to peturb his edge line with a ‘force field’ of particles, so I layered a gradient wash according to slope to vary the pigment effect. Placing a null at object centre and using ‘distance to object’ could look good too.

  • gradient step 1: color 255 253 156, alpha 0, parameter 0;
  • step 2: 255 236 084, alph 65%, parameter 0.6211;
  • step 3level: color 255 097 021, alpha 87.5%, parameter 1.0

Layer 3, opacity 27% - a similar wash but in a violet color - alpha settings are 0%, 69%, 39% for the gradient levels/keys.

Layer 4, opacity 100% - a crumple procedural to break up the violet wash. Frequencies 8, small power 0.773. Scale XYZ at 10cm.

  1. To simulate a paper texture, I set the Bump channel at 20%, and under ‘T’ used a crumple procedural texture. Value 80%, frequencies 6, small power 1, scale X: 2cm, Y: 2cm, Z: 1m

  2. I set Translucency to 40% in order to get a nice highlight rim around my model. Post-processing will flatten the shading a bit, this will help retain a sense of form.

Next: post-processing.


#20

Step 2: Post- Processing

Next, I wanted to accomplish two things - increase the saturation (easy), and ‘smudge’ the color outside the lines of the model, even slightly.

1. Under Scene/Image Processing/Add Image Filter I added a Wavefilter, and set Saturation to 300%. This switched my el cheapo student pigment pale surface for an expensive professional pigment. In Wavefilter Properties go to the Affect tab and set Affected Areas to “Selected Surfaces”.

2. Under Scene/Image Processing/Add Image Filter add another Wavefilter iteration. I keep them separate as it’s easier to switch around the rendering order. In Wavefilter Properties select Image/Edge Blend: 250%, passes 25, tolerance 10%. Under the Affect tab, select 'Full Frame".

Next: Unreal Shader settings.