Top Art Colleges out there?


#1

I’m a high school student and already applied for colleges.

  1. School of Visual Arts
  2. Ringling

Heard they were one of the best so…
are there any other top colleges?

Oh and I’m trying to major in CG animation. ^^ Creating my world.


#2

It really depends what field of ‘art’ your going into.

These are the top schools:

For Graphic-Design: Swinburne,
For Multimedia : RMIT


#3

http://www.pixar.com/companyinfo/jobs/schools.html


http://www.rhythm.com/inside_randh/outreach_schools.shtml

I currently attend Savannah College of Art and Design along with a few other people on this board. Try applying here. :thumbsup:


#4

Oh and remember that going to the ‘best’ art school is not going to make you the ‘best’ artist.


#5

im attending RIT (Rochester Institute of Technology). its cool. not great but okay. have a lot of drop outs tho, i think mostly cause of the difficulty. apparently their philosophy is to let people in then pare out the good ones
they set it up so that you arent doing just animation, you also do live action, traditional animation, etc.


#6

Vancouver Film School.


#7

anyone attending school of visual arts?


#8

Well here is “The Best Art School.” (according to The Visual Art Critic and US News and World Report)

The Visual Art Critic

Along with Walt Disney and Orson Wells, they forgot to mention Tex Avery as a former grad.

US News 1997 Ranking

Of course the US News report was done in 1997 (they havn’t since had another art ranking) and it was considering Graduate programs. It is considering FINE ARTS and not computer animation.

SAIC does have a small computer animation program, with a lab of powerful Linux based machines, running the latest Maya software. Currently, a Technical Director from ILM, is teaching the classes. They also have great Traditional Animation/Film/Video programs.

While you may not get the best CG training at SAIC, you will be surrounded by some of the best artists as instructors and some of the best student artists in the world. If you want to learn about conceptual art, give them a look. They also have an extremely painless admissions process.

Here’s the link:

www.artic.edu/saic/

Oh and Chicago is one of the greatest cities in the world…

-struggler


#9

I think your ability to succeed in the industry is a lot more about your focus and ability to achieve an artistic goal in CG than about where you’ve gone to school.

Interesting that you’d bring up the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. At least FOUR good friends of mine all graduated from there the same year, and I recruited all of them, but they’re the only people from there that I believe I’ve ever met in the industry. It is, however, a good school with high standards.

– Mark


#10

well i wanna go to a good college because there, it’ll be challenging. And challenge is the thing that we need to improve our skills. It just keeps us pushing forward you know? ^^

yea… chicago … lot of people go there for fine arts… dunno about cg though.


#11

Mark brings up a good point. The school can only be as good as the students talent, ambition and focus. Exactly the reason why I mention a school which stress’s concept and talent over technical skills that you can easily learn from a book.

SAIC’s philosophy is you don’t have to make it in the “industry” in order to be successful as an artist. They would rather you find or create your own individual way of showing your work. Grants, Television, Festivals, Teaching, Gallery’s, etc. (With the extensive tuition costs these methods do not suit everyone)

I can list a handful of grads who have broke into the industry and are working at some of the larger studios, Pixar, ILM, Disney, R&H etc. (Possibly some are your friends?) Suprising that Pixar and other larger studios do not list SAIC as a top art school considering they employ these grads.

-struggler


#12

Well, like I say, I only know those four, and they all graduated in 1997. On the other hand, I don’t spend a lot of time researching from where my coworkers graduate.

As a counterpoint, I went to Harvey Mudd College. Harvey Mudd’s graduating classes are about 150 people each, and at the time I went there they offered four majors: physics, math, chemistry, and a generic engineering degree. (They’ve since added biology and computer science programs.)

I can think of 12 HMC graduates (out of maybe 4500 in the school’s entire history) who have done well in computer animation and visual effects. In fact, one of my classmates from the class of 1991 (Scott Stokdyk of Sony) has been nominated twice for the Visual Effects Academy Award.

Where I’m going with this is that the school offers one computer science class relevant to computer graphics and has no program that focuses in the field, yet somehow lots of their graduates end up working in CG. Go figure… (probably something about “talent, ambition, and focus.”) :smiley:

– Mark


#13

Just remember that some of thoes schools you guys are refering to are quite expensive. And with entry level salaries the way they are, you better hope your end up being good so you can pay back thoes loans. Just soemthing to think about.


#14

Just remember that some of thoes schools you guys are refering to are quite expensive. And with entry level salaries the way they are, you better hope your end up being good so you can pay back thoes loans. Just soemthing to think about.

Didn’t an underground militia blow up all the credit card company buildings? Or was that just a movie? sniffle

-struggler
default is my only friend and the only reason anyone calls me…


#15

Well, I’m thinking of going to Sheridan’s post-graduate programs for Computer Animation and Visual Effects.

From what I’ve heard, Sheridan is among the hardest schools to be accepted into. Very competitive entry, and lots and lots of turn aways… something like a 1/10 applicant acceptance ratio.

And compared to some of the other places out there… the tutition is fantastic.

The only thing is, you need a 3 or 4 year college degree to get into the program. :thumbsup: They mean business.

-DivideByZero-

BTW… I’ve heard some bad things about SCAD and VFS, so be sure to do a ton of research first.


#16

my friend goes to svanaah and he’s like…
whatever you do… don’t come here…

he’s also leaving that college and going to another school.


#17

i know it may seem silly, but i’m kinda curious if any have heard good or bad things about the Art Institutes International? i’m attending one here in MN, which is all gravy but i really wanted to go to the one in Phoniex simply cause they had courses specially aimed for game design & such :banghead: the one here is suppose to be more open for just about eveything… which sometimes sucks cause unless your seriously motivated for success your pretty much just showing up to make the grade rather than improve your artistic skillz. many thanks now if anyone could spit some info i don’t already know…


#18

I’m applying to the Ontario School of Art and Design now, and gotten a portfolio interview. What I have been hearing from reading diferent sites and different posts, that learning the basics of art is good. This school concentrates on art, theory and practice, and they offer mostly painting, drawing, graphic design,sculpture, printmaking, design courses,digital media (I think). What I have gathered from looking at some other art school, while they may focus on as they say, the analog majors, they will offer courses in animation and digital media from time to time. so maybe look at the school calendars would help. While you may not be able to concentrate soley on cg, you will get a good grip in art and still get some experience in cg. It is possible to learn cg stuff in your spare time, so you could do that.


#19

Originally posted by DivideByZero
[B]Well, I’m thinking of going to Sheridan’s post-graduate programs for Computer Animation and Visual Effects.

From what I’ve heard, Sheridan is among the hardest schools to be accepted into. Very competitive entry, and lots and lots of turn aways… something like a 1/10 applicant acceptance ratio.

And compared to some of the other places out there… the tutition is fantastic.

The only thing is, you need a 3 or 4 year college degree to get into the program. :thumbsup: They mean business.

-DivideByZero-
[/B]

I am a Sheridan graduate. Classical Animation [3yr] and Computer Animation [1yr]. 4 fun and gruelling years. All worth it.


#20

so i imagine that its safe to say that if your taking part in all this schooling from kick ass locations and getting accepted into top notch places… you must be making some good money to pay for all this :blush: