Sketchbook Thread of Margie


#1

More sketches to come…some I did from Rebecca’s threads (and never posted, shame on me!), some from Andrew Loomis, some from references I found on the web.


#2

Study of arm muscles after Loomis (probably figure drawing for all it’s worth)
Still haven’t figured out how the muscles of the upper arm run, never mind all those tendons in the lower arm, or how the ulna and radius twist for that matter. Still, it helped me a great deal to study these, I’ll never draw an arm without a deltoid again :slight_smile:


#3

Margie,

Heya, good to see you start a new thread! :slight_smile: May I have your permission to change the name of your thread to “Anatomy Thread of Margie”? This makes it easier for me to keep things organized / for people to search for individual Anatomy Threads. :slight_smile:

Looking forward to seeing your work! :slight_smile:

Stole a quick peek at your piece ~ nice work, and very funny comments!!

Cheers, :slight_smile:

~Rebeccak


#4

Rebecca, sure, no problem changing the thread name!

Here’s another one from the Loomis books


#5

Done, thanks! :slight_smile:


#6

This one I made when I was halfway through “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain” and was surprised as it turned out how I intended. The girl is from a photo reference (not traced, but using the guidelines). I liked her expression of defiance and began imagining a story around it. I intend to make a painting from this.

[img]http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c99/MdeBrie/PaintThis13b.png[/img]

detail:

[img]http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c99/MdeBrie/detail.png[/img]

#7

Nice! These are nicely reminiscent of 1950’s style illustrations…nice stuff!! :slight_smile:

Cheers,

~Rebeccak


#8

This is were my avatar came from: copy of a drawing by Dutch author/artist Jan Veth, depicting a woman and child in 19th century Haarlem. She’s carrying a pan of soup under her apron.


#9

Mastercopy of Dürer


#10

Nice master copy! When was that done? :slight_smile:

Cheers,

~Rk


#11

The Jan Veth copy? October 6th 2005, with a piece of software that has an awesome paint engine, but is also dreadfully unstable (Twisted Brush, REALLY nice soft watercolors).


#12

Skull from one of Rebecca’s workshops which I never posted. Unfinished and in need of some dental work.


#13

Wow, Margie! It’s so cool to find out that you were following the thread when I didn’t know about it! :slight_smile: How cool that you’ve posted it now! :slight_smile:

Cheers,

~Rebeccak


#14

From anatomy thread 001


#15

Another secret following of the Anatomy Forum! :slight_smile: Happy to see your work, Margie! :slight_smile:

I’ll definitely try to post something more constructive later, when I can take a better look at your work. :slight_smile:

Cheers,

~Rk


#16

From a photo ref of Hong Ly’s website.


#17

Something quite funny happened today. On monday, December 5th, it’s “Sinterklaas” in the Netherlands. Sinterklaas is curious mix between a Turkish bishop and good ol’ Santa Claus from the North Pole. The festival is mostly for little children and on that day, in the early evening, they get presents and candy.

But teens still like to celebrate it too. The fun part for them is now that they can give presents instead of being only on the receiving end. These present usually get wrapped up in very creative ways, and in the case of my daughters, are not always very pleasant to unwrap (but that’s the fun part!) and are accompanied by poems, pointing out the perculiarities of the person receiving the present.

In most Dutch families, people make a list of presents they would like to receive and then draw lots and exchange lists. Not in our family. Everybody buys presents for everybody and half of the fun is trying to figure out what each family member would like to have.

My daughters have of course noticed I spend a great deal of time on the anatomy forum, heard me rant that I’m no good at all with bones and muscles and also heard me mumble something about wanting to do an oilpainting of one of the reference photo’s.

Today was shopping day. More fun, because you have to somehow manage to buy presents without the rest of the family noticing you are doing it. While we were in town, we passed THE art supplies shop and I was about to enter the shop, saying that I wanted to buy a canvas for that oilpainting (and sneek in a present for my daughters), when my youngest daughter created a diversion. To me a signal my eldest was up to something ( a canvas perhaps?), so I took the bait and wondered with glee how on earth she was going to hide a 60 by 80 centimeter canvas. They had casually quizzed me on how large I thought this painting was going to be.

We agreed to meet at 5 at the expressobar. Patricia, my eldest, had no visible canvas. When we got home, suddenly the both of them rushed out again, saying they had forgot to buy something for a friend. 15 minutes later they returned. I pretended to be very busy cooking and not to see the large rectanglar, thin packet they where trying to hide, but I saw anyway… While they manoeuvered the thing upstairs, something dropped from Patricia’s handbag. A book. Maybe I should have pretended I didn’t see that either, but ah… I guess I’m a little curious. I picked up the book at the same moment the ladies came rushing downstairs again.

It was Anatomy and Figure Drawing and Drawing the Human Head by Louis Gordon.

“Nice book, can’t recall having seen it in this house before” I said.

I half expected a fib to explain what this book was doing there, only to find it wrapped in some cotuonwool drenched in treacle on December 5. But no, they had run out of excuses and confessed that this was their present for me.

And so now I have run out of excuses too. After all this, I can’t really NOT do anatomy drawings and work from the book front to back. The price tag was still on it, it cost them 15 euro, a lot of money for them. Isn’t that just the sweetest thing of them to be so supportive of my artistic endeavours?

I like the book a lot. I like the delicate and clear drawings and I couldn’t resist starting on the first drawing right away. It’s still a WIP, and this is what ot looks like after an hour (or two).


#18

Margie,

That is just the sweetest and most touching story...thank you for sharing it with all of us! :)
It sounds as though with your lovely family, you have a really charmed life, and it is fantastic to hear a bit about it! :) I seriously have a little water in my eye after reading this for the second time...

My daughters have of course noticed I spend a great deal of time on the anatomy forum, heard me rant that I’m no good at all with bones and muscles and also heard me mumble something about wanting to do an oilpainting of one of the reference photo’s.

This made me lol! :)

You also have a great start on your drawing ~ and I really look forward to seeing what your next update will be. :)

Happy Sinterklaas! :)

Here is some yummy pepernoten! :slight_smile:

Cheers, 

~Rebeccak

#19

:applause:
Is this the same margie from the Laborganika forums?

Nice work!
Keep it up.


#20

Aww…thanks for the pepernoten! :slight_smile: They are my most favorite “Sinterklaas” treat.
I didn’t mention them, because I’m not sure if these Dutch treats are known in the rest of the world. But then again, if the Dutch emigrate, it’s guaranteed they bring along the pepernoten, oliebollen (doughnutty things eaten at new years’ eve) and erwtensoep (peasoup).