Seperating the boys from the men


#1

i’ve got a problem…

wow, my screen is really bright…

what? i mean, i’ve got a patience problem.

judging from most of the work that appears in Finished 3D forum, it seems that most people do actually have visionnary skills. But these only get you so far. Most can model very well indeed. And most probably know their software like the back of their hands. But why aren’t more works appearing in the Choice Gallery more often?

My personal problem is that i lack the patience to meticulously model details on, say, faces, clothing, etc… I will begin a project and become impatient and frustrated half an hour in; if things don’t go exactly as planned. I am very passionate about this art form, but sometimes i just can’t go through with it.

Patience seems to be the main factor seperates the good from the great. How do you harness it? Can you ‘learn’ it? Are there tricks? Must you have an affirming conversation with yourself? To all those who’ve made it into the Choice Gallery… how do you do it?

…gee, that spider over there has a lot of legs… what time is it?

thanks a lot


#2

One of the primary things that separates the pros from the amateurs is the ability to finish consistently.

Mainly it comes down to drive.

-L


#3

This sounds like more of a confidence problem than paitence… at least if I use myself as reference.
I used to be in a similar situation… I would constantly start and quit projects, and as soon as something wasnt looking the way I hoped it would, I would quit and try again on a fresh project…
Maybe this isnt your problem at all, but I figured I could offer a different perspective for you… perhaps you need to gain more confidence in your work?


#4

Actually the problem that I see with lots of 3d work is that the art is done for rendering’s sake, not the rendering for the art’s sake. Seems that lots of the things I see are just excercises in rendering, without having any interesting elements to them.

cough CARs cough cough


#5

Actually the problem that I see with lots of 3d work is that the art is done for rendering’s sake, not the rendering for the art’s sake. Seems that lots of the things I see are just excercises in rendering, without having any interesting elements to them.

cough CARs cough cough

Go mumblesyourself

Sports Car’s look awesome, I will never tire of them. There’s no problem with refining your rendering process to get better!:smiley:


#6

Thank you, I will pamper myself! :smiley:


#7

You want to learn patience? Get a girlfriend and go clothes shopping with her. :eek:


#8

lol that is just so right


#9

It’s great that you are asking the question and looking for answers. Hopefully some of the masters will chime in on this great subject. “How do you do what you do? And how can I?”

I imagine that most of the greats have probably been sitting in dark rooms for many hours per day refining their skills. If you ask a great musician how they play such amazing music, more than likely they will say “practice.” How about a great basketball player? A great author? A great painter?

Basically, if you want to get good at anything…sleep, eat and breathe it everyday. I’m sure that’s what most, if not all of the masters on this forum will say. It may only take someone (i.e. Craig Mullins) an hour to sketch out something wickedly cool. But it took him YEARS of building the skill EVERYDAY in order to get to that level. 3D is no different. So take your clock off the wall, sell your TV, unplug the internet and get busy! :slight_smile:


#10

If patience is your main obstacle, then you really need to figure out a way overcome it. Perhaps if you break up your work sessions into little manageable chunks in order to make some progress. Some progress is better than no progress.

Your frustration comes from the fact that you do give up. Instead, figure out a better way to work. Find a technique that will aide you. And plan out your models throughly in advance before you even sit in front of the computer. That way, you’ll already know what to do when you come across those obstacles. The main thing is to finish a project, regardless of if it turned out the way you planned or not. I’m willing to bet there were a lot of accidents throughout the work of the greats. And on the same coin, there were a lot of happy little accidents too. Just finish a project from start to finish, and try to improve things on the next one.

This is a fun artform. You should be having fun doing this, not being impatient or frustrated with it. CG is not similar to raising kids. Just go and enjoy. Eat, breathe, and live this stuff.

peace,

Lu


#11

i get that too sometimes but only when i see that it won’t be good.

I want every project i’m working on to be better then the last one and so i have many unfinished projects laying around.

But when i do see a great image comming forth i wouldn’t mind modelling every brick of a castle :smiley:


#12

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