"[Schlitzy Screentest contest] JTalbotski's WIP"


#1

Here’s my quick storyboard. It is surely too much for me to handle, but I couldn’t think of a shorter scene that I liked. Any advice is MOST appreciated.

Jim


#2

nice work on the boards Jim. THe only things that will be difficult will be getting the dialogue recorded after you do that though it’s just a matter of getting the poses and the timing…

You’ve done well to keep it simple as far as sets and props go so you really only have to worry about the character.

next step: get the board put together as an animatic to start laying down your basic timing.

Great start!
-David


#3

Thanks, David. Should I add more drawings to fill out the animatic more. Or just use what I’ve got?

Thanks again,
Jim


#4

matter of preference really I tend to just use the story board, but some people want to feel the motion more at that stage. I would recommend that you start with just the board and then if it feels too stiff (or is to hard to get the timing set up) add a few more drawings to see how that goes. don’t forget to get some basic voices in there too, you can’t time that stuff out (in my opinion) until you hear the voices.

-David


#5

Great storyboard, Jim. I hope you can get this done, it looks like it will be good.


#6

Storyboard looks great! You might want to break it up into a few different camera angles though. It’s easier to animate four short shots rather then one long shot.(at least to me anyway) plus its easier to throw stuff away. This is just my opinion maybe you were already going to do this.

nice job
:thumbsup:


#7

Good tip, dagooos! I think I’ll do it that way.

Thanks,
Jim


#8

Okay, I’m having way more fun than I thought I would developing this “animation”. I did a quick and dirty soundtrack, using some canned sound effects from an old Kaboom! cd I had lying around and my own voice. I adjusted the pitch of my voice for each character and put together an animatic, which you can see here:

http://home.comcast.net/~jimtalbot3d/SCHLITZY-ANIMATIC-SOR.mov

And I did a quick lipsync using the mouth poses I originally put in Schlitzy here:

http://home.comcast.net/~jimtalbot3d/LIPSYNC-SOR.mov

These Require Quicktime with the first Sorenson codec, maybe QT5 (?).

I know the sound is pretty awful (and irritating after hearing it over and over), but I’m enjoying learning things as I go.

Jim


#9

Wow! you’re a natural animator Jim, thanks for a good giggle and great gag BTW.
Judging from what you’ve already accomplished, I don’t think this will be too much for you to handle. In fact, I shall prune my own idea down to size, if I ever hope to finish it.


#10

Thanks, Stephen! I’m sure I will be asking many questions of you and the others.

Thanks for the encouragement,
Jim


#11

I’m in complete agreement with stephen! great job. good timings and it feels well paced. heck I’d say it’s time to start blocking things in! :thumbsup:

-David Rogers


#12

Hahaha, that’s great Jim. Very funny idea.

Two things on the lip sync though. Try selling the whistle a little more. Maybe try puffing the cheeks a bit more and squint his eyes so it looks like he’s really trying. You might even want to do an animated decal on his face, making it turn redder, so it really looks like he is having a hard time whistling.

And at the end when he says “my whistle too much”, it looks a bit jumpy, like he’s trying to hit too many sounds. Try hitting just the first letter in each word at first and see how that looks. You could always add more keys later.

Great work! :stuck_out_tongue:

Brian


#13

Thanks, David and Brian.

I agree about the lipsync being overly complex in certain places. I guess I was trying to match the sound too accurately. I was having fun doing it. That might be another reason, I just couldn’t stop! A:M makes it fun.

I got the Stop Staring book, with my Schlitzy prize money. :slight_smile: It made me see that lipsync isn’t something to fear. You just break it down to simple shapes open and close, wide and narrow.

I like the idea off his face turning red, too. I didn’t focus on the rest of his face yet, but I will try to do that when I get to that point.

Thanks guys,
Jim


#14

Great purchase Jim. Stop Staring should be on every animator’s shelf. Jason did a magnificent job with it. It definitely shows that you’ve read it, as this early pass was already really nice.

If you have half the skill animating as you do modeling, you will be phenomenal. I’m really looking forward to see how good this is going to turn out. Heck, even your voice work was great. I’m guessing we’ll be seeing a great Talbotski short sometime soon :thumbsup:


#15

Impressive start, Jim!
I’ve got to get a hold of a copy of that Stop Staring book, too!

Sincerely,

Carl Raillard


#16

Hi Jim,

Just looked at your animatic and it looks really good.
Voice work was really good also very fitting to character!


#17

Hi all,

Thanks Carl and dagooos!

Here’s an early render of Schlitzy walking into view at the beginning of my animation. It’s not a walk cycle on a path. I keyframed each step (and it probably shows!) It was pretty tricky trying to get him to walk and also turn at the same time. Unfortunately, it seems pretty bland as it is. No real character to his action. Any advice?

I plan on cutting to a closeup of his face for the next shot, as dagooos suggested, to break it down into smaller manageable chunks.

http://home.comcast.net/~jimtalbot3d/schlitzy-enters.mov

Thanks,
Jim


#18

Jim, I think he has quite a lot of character in his walk and the animation is nice and smooth:) The feet sliding, is the most noticeable problem. I would have them slap down flat on the floor quicker, ie. less time on the heel. At the moment, it takes about 8 frames from the heel touching the ground to the point when the feet are flat on the floor. I’d cut that down to 3 frames. This would also have the added benefit of allowing the feet to have longer ‘flat’ on the ground, thus making the walk less floaty. Make sure the heel doesn’t move when in contact with the ground, the only way to ensure this is to add more key frames, (use the rulers to line things up). You might also have observed, characters with big feet tend to waddle side to side more and splay their feet out sideways, this avoids the awkward action of them having to rise on the ball of the foot too much. Although, I do like the bobbing up and down feel of his walk.
I’m looking forward to seeing what happens next Jim.
I shall start putting in my major key frames for the first pass of my animation today, hopefully I’ll have something to show soon.


#19

Thanks for the advice, Stephen! Seeing it again after you mentioned the foot slap, it seemed pretty obvious there was a problem there. I’m really going to have to learn what to look for.

I can’t wait to see how you and the others build your animations!

Thanks,
Jim


#20

Looking pretty goos so far. Another thing you can do to give it that extra “stick” look. Is to subtly lift the toe right before the foot comes down than in the next fram or two lay it flat.