Russian "Happy New Years"=How to say it?


#1

um…like this is weird…but ta…i tried those translators and i still cant find what im lookin for,ok?

I want to say “happy new years” in Russian

can someone who speaks good russian(or whatever is all the languages,im not even sure if its one or more langages but moscow is the place where this person is from that i want to say it) and good in english write it here so i can read it and speak it perfectly

like write the happy new years in russian then break it down syllable by syllable in english so i can read it and speak it like its supposed to be pronouced in russian?substitute the sounds for what it would look like in english

I would be very thankful to anyone and what the hay,we should start a thread with all the different ways to say happy new years,that’d be cool,the mods might delete it like they might delete this one but someone could PM me if you want

bought the only russian i know is Neyt(sp?) meaning no…lol,so that gives you an idea of what a nincompoop i am about forgien languages(what am I saying I cant even speak english properly,lol,you get the idea right?


#2

VODKA!!!

:smiley: Ok, so it was a bad stereotyped politically incorrect statement. But I am sure that it has been said at least once in lieu of Happy New Years.


#3

Warum sagen Sie es nicht einfach auf Deutsch? Es Ist Glückliches Neues Jahr!!! Ummm, yeah… why not just say it in German… It’s Happy new year!!!, That was the translation.:shrug:


#4

Haven’t studied Russian for along time so here’s my best shot.

S Novym Godom, pronounced SNO-vim GO-dahm. The ‘o’ pronounced as it is in Obvious, and the capitals denote which syllable is stressed.

Literally it means ‘With the New Year’ - there’s no mention of happiness there, but I guess it is implied :shrug:

I’ve never been in Russia for New Year, so I’m not sure exactly in what context it would be used, as a phrase alone for example, or in a toast with vodka glass raised. It might be quite different over the phone and not eye-to-eye.


#5

Originally posted by Ordibble P. Lop
[B]Haven’t studied Russian for along time so here’s my best shot.

S Novym Godom, pronounced SNO-vim GO-dahm. The ‘o’ pronounced as it is in Obvious, and the capitals denote which syllable is stressed.

Literally it means ‘With the New Year’ - there’s no mention of happiness there, but I guess it is implied :shrug: [/B]

Yup, you got it.

/Belarussian


#6

Yeah, what Ordibble said. Yes, happiness is implied, because you kinda umm… leave old crap behind in the old year :smiley:


#7

Originally posted by Ordibble P. Lop
S Novym Godom, pronounced SNO-vim GO-dahm. The ‘o’ pronounced as it is in Obvious, and the capitals denote which syllable is stressed.

It’s more like “o” in “boring”.

I’d spell it like that:

sssnOwv’em gOwd’em :slight_smile:


#8

Originally posted by dvornik
[B]It’s more like “o” in “boring”.

I’d spell it like that:

sssnOwv’em gOwd’em :slight_smile: [/B]

OMG, what kind of accent is that? You mister have been living in the States for way too long :slight_smile:


#9

Like I said, o as in boring - it’s as close as you gonna get.
And to write it in Russian it try this:
C HOB…M …O…OM
replacing the missing characters with characters labled as:
y (yery), g (ge) and d (de) (don’t ask me why) on the following page, just make them sans-serif:

http://www.omniglot.com/writing/cyrillic.htm#russian


#10

Hmmmmmmmm…

well,something tells me im still going to be laughed at but i will give it me bestest shot guys…

so like “snaw-vim gaw-dem”???

four syllibles?


#11

Close. Jost pronounce O as in gore or snore (without the “r” part), not as in snow. Four sillables allright. And intonation as in “growing boredom”.


#12

ok,lol

something tells me im going to look like this guy–>>:blush: after i say it…lol


#13

greenlee … I wouldn’t worry about being laughed at … from my travels “native” peoples appreciate the fact that you’re making the attempt to speak their language.

in spanish … Feliz Ano Nuevo


#14

well…
i wrote to this person before in russian and they said they could read about half of what i wrote…lol
my french isnt any better either
i wrote a whole letter in french and they said it was like try to speak french backwards

there’s something about russian that its more like a train of thoughts when they speak instead of the way a english sentence is built,doesnt have the subject,verbs,adverbs,adjetives,pronouns structure or something like english does


#15

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