Rare employees walk out?


#1

check this out…

http://xbox.ign.com/articles/533/533084p1.html?fromint=1

Rumor that a buch of employees have walked out of Rare. Anyone hear anything more about this?


#2

There sick of making Star Fox games all the live long day … :shrug:


#3

I have done some digging and checked with my sources within the company and it’s not true.


#4

ummm… Microsoft bought them long time ago. no more star fox games for Rare. like OzzyCat said, this might not be true, but now that Gamasutra is reporting it, who knows [their not much for posting rumors].

here is the news…

http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=4072 [login needed, but here is the whole stroy…]

Staff Walkouts Rumored At Rare
Unnamed sources in both the US and UK have described a significant wave of departures from Microsoft first party developer Rare. The walkouts are allegedly due to internal politics and/or unhappiness with the direction of various games, with suggestions that some staff have already found new employment with British companies such as Codemasters and Eidos.

Since the purchase of the studio for an alleged £375 million ($690m) in 2002 only one new Xbox game has been released under the Rare label - the critical and commercial failure Grabbed by the Ghoulies.


#5

walkouts, whether optional or necessary happen all the time. I am certain the stability of the studio remains intact.


#6

well they’re clearly working on

Perfect Dark 2 and Kameo for Xbox 2 launch games,

I know some people who used to work at rare said its ok if the polotics dont start to effect you, but if they do then it becomes easy for groups of “stick together friends” to flake off and go to start small companies away from the commercial cooker pressure that is rare,

Which is what Free Radical Design is,

But having said that they all said they enjoyed working at Rare for a long time before they considered leaving, so it must be quite cool.

I dont think i know anyone there at the moment, so i dont know if its right or not, good news for us lot if it is true as they will be lookng for new staff :wink:


#7

Considering all the other issues with game studios, would anyone really be surprised if this were true? :surprised

-B


#8

what are the issues that would require employee walkouts? (not necessarily just rare but in other studios too)

just curious.


#9

Uh oh, time to apply! haha


#10

80+ hour weeks, low pay (for CS standards at least), impossible deadlines… etc…

I don’t want to imply that Rare, or any game company in particular, suffers from these issues. We read the story over a week ago of an employee who had enough of the hours or unpaid overtime and was taking his workplace to court. Game development used to attract some of the best minds in computer science, but now I fear they only look for people willing to work the 80+ hours, and worry about knowledge or experience later.

What’s worse. We all hear about the budgets for games going into the millions now, but I haven’t seen any noticable rise in the saleries of programmers or artists.

This is just my take on the issue though. Please let me know if I’m way off base.

-B


#11

Damn, I was just going to apply for RARE. Their location looks very nice from the photos! :sad:


#12

if that were true, all us students struggling to get work would be employed… i know I would work at a studio with 80+ hour weeks, crap pay and tonnes of silly deadlines…

but i see where you’re coming from


#13

Yeah, but piss and moan, piss and moan. People know what they’re getting into when they sign on the dotted line. Myself like almost everyone I know in the industry has busted thier ass like that or worse at one time or another, either to break in, earn thier stripes, or make a deadline. It’s the nature of what we do. If you don’t like you’re pay, don’t agree to it. If you don’t like your hours, go do a 9to5 job. A walkout is a grown up version of a hissy-fit. Someone who’s too afraid to do anything about thier situation other than stomp thier feet. And bigger budgets, that’s not an artist’s concearn, the company is allowed to make money, last I heard. If you want a bigger chunk of a budget, start your own damn company and give all your money to the artists, because that’s what everyone would do, right?


#14

No offense JishJosj but that sounds like a LOAD of b-s… in an industry like Vg, film, or even just CG when the deadline, budget, and design can flux and change so fast I don’t blame anyone for moving on o greener pastors… I dont think startin another company is the best choice… but I definetly dont think that when u sign that line on the contract your signing your soul away for the company to a$$ rape you. Weither we’re talented intelligent artist or just fools willing to work for 80 hours… we are still employee’s and without us the company is nothing. You have the right to demand better for you and your fellow worker… your happiness will carry into the product you create and the company’s overall image… o well


#15

Thats utter crap, A walk out is when you’ve tried all other avenues to make working at the place reasonable and your boss has turned around and laughed at you, bought himself a Aston Martin DB9, and flown to LA for a 30 minute meeting and 2 week “working” Vacation and told you you cant have your £1000 a year pay rise. but you will have to work weekends redoing work that was fine.

Nobody wants to walk out, you walk out when your about to snap and burn the place down,

OR

if you get an offer you can’t refuse, like to head a new art team at another company, something like that,

a walk out is very rarely either lightly taken or as you put it a hissy fit,


#16

Why is the boss not entitled to his Aston Martin? He/she is the one taking all the risks, running a bussiness, etc. If they have a DB9, and you’re not getting your paychecks, that’s another story. Then you should be pissed.

The whole point of starting your own business is that you are rewarded for your risks. What risks are you taking that make you feel more entitled to some of that money? How much money and time have you invested into the company. How financially ruined will you be if it goes under?

You can leave your job and go elsewhere if you don’t like it. But don’t be pissed at someone running a BUSINESS and enjoying the spoils.


#17

Dam skippy!


#18

jishjosh, your comments and sometimes those of Jackdeth become shortsighted.

Very few reasonable people would argue about the issue of risk reward, but just because you are taking the risk doesn’t mean you can’t treat the employees that helped make your risk worth it well.

Yes, it’s the employers right to but the DB9, spend the 2 weeks paid vacation and ask you to work 80 hours a week so that they can sustain that life style. And yes, sometimes this industry is pure pleasure, and we will stay at the facility for a month to finish the project in time (like I’m doing now!). That said, the employee has the right to feel that they aren’t treated well, for whatever reason, be it unfit pay, too many hours, whatever. They don’t need to bow down and thank their employers for giving them the opportunity to work 80 hours making wall textures for a level, or rotoscoping a poorly lit greenscreen. There are always two sides and claiming one side is silly without knowing the details just becomes void of merit.


#19

I’ve been on both sides, my friend. I used to be partners in a VFX/Post house in Santa Monica. The company is still going, but I left. I’m back on the other side as an artist, and having seen it from the other side, I can show empathy for the people trying to run a business as they see fit, not to mention enjoy it in the face of the spirit crushing obstacles every f-ing five minutes in the shifty land we live in called Hollywood. That bulls–t along with dealing with partners, Flame leases, producers, clients, artists, directors, all good and bad, was enough for me to leave the whole running the business to someone else. It can really suck, and sometimes the only relief you get is to be able to go on vacation, or a spin in your hot rod, and know that work is still being done.

So, while you have every right to feel how you do, not until you’ve been on the other side can you truly know what it’s like.


#20

true, I agree there, but you did say people walking out was like a hissy fit which is what got this going,

I plan to start my own studio some day, so im sure i’ll get to experince this and i understand where your coming from, :slight_smile: