Orcs of an older sort. WIP


#1

There’s been a great deal of imagery posted when it comes to the Fantasy Characters of Orcs. Yet most of the images seemed to fall under 2 catagories, WETA’s version of LOTR orcs and then Blizzard’s version of Warcraft Orcs.

I submit that there is no real guideline on how orcs look. In fact they are humanoid class characters, for those of you who played D&D and still do. The problem I see is that a standard has been set on a design and I’ve seen orcs that were nothing more than humans with green skins, to the pig faced orcs with high bulk found in the D&D designs. Yet these in-betweens seem to be deeply shunned by designers nowadays and earlier orc designs has taken a back seat to WETA’s and Blizzard’s version of orcs.

Therefore I decided to break the current trend and go with an older orc design. I bought a D&D Monster Manual about a week ago and was study their view of fantasy creatures and just as I expected, different from others. The orc design however stood out the most as it has changed little since 1982 when I was playing D&D as a Kid.

I’ll post more tommorrow when I get more done, but now I have to get back to work.


#2

do you think you could let us know how u started the head? I would love to know…I have the basics of modeling now but I just never know how to make a head :shrug:


#3

I’m with you on that, dude!
Can’t wait to see more updates.
:thumbsup:


#4

looks very good so far!! As far as what to call a orc or any other character limited only by your imagination. I think different styles of “standard” types will constantly be evolving. Not good or bad thing imho.

The lines do get fuzzy with the weta types though, seems that the orcs and goblins become very similiar at times.:shrug:


#5

An interesting WIP, Jonathan :slight_smile:

I like the piggish nose - he kinda reminds me of one of the characters in Return of the Jedi - the guard that lets Luke into Jabba’s palace.

It’s a bit early on in the wip to really make much more critique, other than to say that so far it looks cool. Perhaps the ears could be a tiny bit bigger :stuck_out_tongue:

Out of interest, orcs were actually invented by Tolkien :slight_smile:
And they are described as being humanlike in appearance since they were distorted humans or Elves, corrupted to a race of slaves by the evil god, Melkor. This is told in The Silmarillion. So there is nothing wrong with making orcs humanesque, since that is technically a purist rendition if one wishes to remain true to the original. So it’s not really a “current trend”, it’s simply an established idea :slight_smile:

D&D and Warcraft simply took the name and redesigned their appearance slightly.


#6

Looking awesome man. Good start, clean geomtry. I’ll be watching to see where it goes.

Kenn


#7

@Blue Couger & Locutus:
Thanx! :slight_smile:

@Leigh
Thanx! :slight_smile:
Yep, I’m in my 3rd annual reading of the Silmarillion. One thing I did like about WETA’s LOTR orcs was that they did have a visual simularity to make that connection that they were once elves.

@Rabid Pit
Yeah, that’s true. It just seemed that many of our imaginations seemed to be lacking, or tampered with. :beer:

@shock design
I started from a cube. In fact I generally on use 4 tools when doing organics. Bandsaw, smoothe shift, move and spin quads.

I worked on it a bit more. Right now I’m just trying to get his general mass. The oversized head with short neck is a look I’m not adept to creating so this is interesting for me as well.

Anyway, not so much in the way of detailing just yet. I’m still working out his general mass, and shape. What I’m going for is something less toned, but looks thick and sturdy. Since most of his body is going to be covered in armor and rags, there’s no need to get too detailed, but I’ll add a little more once I’m done with all of his mass. The D&D image that I’m referencing has the orc’s head extremely big with a somewhat small body and huge arms. I’m still uncertain that I’m going to go that route so I’ll have to see.


#8

Okay, now the basic bulk is done and decided. He has sort of an gorrilla-ish look with the short legs, long arms and short thick neck. I think he fulfills the basic inbodiment of strength without grace. The hands I generally do last because they generally have more polys so I model them after detailing is done.

Next, detailing and tweaking. He needs nipples, nipple rigs, separation in parts ie: boots and legs, he needs lines and wrinkles and a bit of definition in areas, polygonal refinement and general tweaking here and there. It gets faster from here. After I’ve done all of this, then I can get started on his armor.


#9

Looks good, maybe the arm muscles should be bigger.

Originally posted by Leigh
[B]Out of interest, orcs were actually invented by Tolkien :slight_smile:
And they are described as being humanlike in appearance since they were distorted humans or Elves, corrupted to a race of slaves by the evil god, Melkor. This is told in The Silmarillion. So there is nothing wrong with making orcs humanesque, since that is technically a purist rendition if one wishes to remain true to the original. So it’s not really a “current trend”, it’s simply an established idea :slight_smile:

D&D and Warcraft simply took the name and redesigned their appearance slightly. [/B]

I am not sure but didnt Tolkien take orcs from nordic and european folk lores? :stuck_out_tongue: I dont mean to be picky


#10

Orcs were invented by Tolkien but the word orc is a bastardization of Orcus, one of Pluto’s (not the Disney dog the Roman god Hades) names.

Some sources say that Orc means demon in Latin, which was eventually used to describe Killer Whales (orca). Tolkien initially created the Hobbit, and further refined his ideas in The Lord of The Rings, but in the Hobbit he referred to Orcs as goblins.

Later (I can’t recall where he said/wrote it…) he mentioned that he used “Orc” instead of “Goblin” in order to distinguish his fantasy world of his own invention from other more conventional words, hence the word “Hobbit”.

Other writings also show that he was leery of using other more common terms as “elves” and “dwarfs” but in the end kept those terms because he felt that he could not come up with more apt words. :slight_smile:

Nice work Teph :smiley: the only limitations you can put on your work can only be by your own hand. :slight_smile:

On an off note the Gamorrean Guards in the early Star Wars films must have been inspired by Tolkien’s Orcs or it must have been a coincidence? Although I can’t recall Tolkien ever describing his Orcs as green…


#11

nice work so far! :thumbsup:


#12

whoa…that head is wicked~ nice job dude :cool:


#13

Originally posted by Leigh

Out of interest, orcs were actually invented by Tolkien :slight_smile:

Hate to disappoint you, but ORCs have been around ever since the Norsemen rolled across the Atlantic. Not to mention elves, gnomes, dwarfs, wyverns, etc etc…

Tolkien actually didn’t invent much in the way of original characters, even the Ents are based in druidic mythology. He states the influence of his creatures are heavy from Western European descent in his interviews.

Story, of course, is another matter.


#14

Originally posted by Primus
[B]

Later (I can’t recall where he said/wrote it…) he mentioned that he used “Orc” instead of “Goblin” in order to distinguish his fantasy world of his own invention from other more conventional words, hence the word “Hobbit”.
[/B]

Actually ORC is a direct bastardization of Milton’s ORK. Both derive from ORCA according to Cambridge’s Entomology 2001.

As for ORCUS, I found no such entry in my latin dictionary here, however for ORCA is latin for, well, dolphins lacking a snout.

I am a geek in more than one genre.


#15

I like the idea that you’re taking your orc in this more original direction.:thumbsup: There seems to be pressure to stay with well-known looks like the LoTR movie, Warcraft etc.


#16

Orcus is not a Latin word, it’s a Latin name for one of the Roman gods, also known as Hades/Dis/Pluto’s. Which predates Milton by a fair bit. Apparently it aludes to Hades darker more vile persona. Look it up :slight_smile:

quoted by Amorano

Actually ORC is a direct bastardization of Milton’s ORK. Both derive from ORCA according to Cambridge’s Entomology 2001.

The word “Orca” or “Orka” was also used by Pliny in Historia Naturalis to describe a sea monster, probably why Orca was appended to the Killer whale.

Here’s part of that line in Latin. Which describes an extremely large and pissed off looking predator. (Sorry my Latin is pathetic, any corrections?).

from Historia Naturalis by Pliny the Elder

Ballaenae et in nostra maria penetrant. in Gaditano oceano non ante brumam conspici eas tradunt, condi autem statis temporibus in quodam sinu placido et capaci, mire gaudentes ibi parere. hoc scire orcas, infestam iis belvam et cuius imago nulla repraesentatione exprimi potest alia quam carnis inmensae dentibus truculentae.

From other sources the word “Orc” was also used in an epic poem, Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto in 1510 which also predates Milton by at least half a century, I haven’t read this though so, anyone care to verify? He also uses the term to describe a sea monster apparently.

William Blake has an epic also called “The Marraige of Heaven and Hell”, and has a character named Orc almost a century after Milton in the 17th century.

As for my knowledge of such apparently irrelevant information, all I can say is that I was enamoured with mythologies, particularly Chinese, Nordic, and Greek(Roman variants of them as well) in the late seventies, as well as more modern mythos such as Lord of The Rings and C. S. Lewis’ Narnia as well as other literature.

Hey I had a lot of time on my hands three decades ago :shrug:


#17

Originally posted by Primus
As for my knowledge of such apparently irrelevant information, all I can say is that I was enamoured with mythologies, particularly Chinese, Nordic, and Greek(Roman variants of them as well) in the late seventies, as well as more modern mythos such as Lord of The Rings and C. S. Lewis’ Narnia as well as other literature.

Hey man, right there with ya. Thanks for the rather useless-outside-of-nerd-parties information. Loved it. :beer:

For a bit of fun (cough cough) I did a rough translation of the Pliny passage (sorry my latin is 5+ years dusty — with liberties of course)…

The whales entered into our seas. They came over the ocean in the winter to be seen in Gaditanus (old Spanish town), to remain, these large, gentlly curved surfaces, wonderful beings, glad to obey.

To scare this sea creature, whom no other is able to meet in stature, one becomes meat to their ferocious teeth.


#18

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