New Forum – Evocative


#21

Originally posted by Bliz
[B]is there a forum order we should be posting images to get critiqued? What I mean is, is it o.k. to post an image on this forum without first posting it anywhere else on cgtalk or would you rather people submitted the picture to ‘focused critiques’ first to get the tecnical issues ironed out?

I assume once it’s been through this forum, a piece would go to it’s relative 2D or 3D ‘Finished Works’ forum?

And another question (sorry, just trying to get this stuff clear in my head) will front page plugs come from this forum or just the ‘finished works’ forums? [/B]

Hi Bliz,

Questions questions questions!

  1. is there a forum order we should be posting images to get critiqued?
    A. It depends on what sort of critique you want. For general critiques on WIP, post in the WIP forums. Evocative focuses squarely on creating imagery that expresses emotion. So the type of crits you’ll get here are the “big picture” type crits - not really delving into the technical details of how to do it with a particular software package.

  2. I assume once it’s been through this forum, a piece would go to it’s relative 2D or 3D ‘Finished Works’ forum?
    A. That is up to you. Mark’s intention for this forum is to raise the overall awareness in the community for creating this type of imagery, and we hope that people who take part in this forum will improve by leaps and bounds. We also hope that this will generate some awesome artwork for EXPOSE’ 2 and beyond.

  3. will front page plugs come from this forum or just the ‘finished works’ forums?
    A. Front page plugs come from anywhere on the forums.

L.


#22

Originally posted by mattregnier
[B]So how’s this forum going to differ from the “focused critique” section. I mean that was started with great intents and then after being around for 6 months, posts like “dude that’s awesome” or “whoa r0x0rs dude” are still the norm.

But I have just seen the answer to the problems addressed with the focused critique forum, and here it is, just make another forum and say you’ll moderate it heavily…really guys, I think we just need to crack down on these people who don’t follow rules, a little warning here/there just doesn’t cut it.

Any suggestions? [/B]

Hi Matt,

This is really the first part of a new process that we hope will raise the level of professionalism on CGTalk. Although some of us abhor the fanboy posts, a recent poll that we did revealed that about 50% of CGTalkers actually liked them.

The temporary solution is that the Serious Critique forums will be for serious, focused discussions and appraisals on work, while the general WIP/Critique forums are more generalised forums, which we will clean up shortly.

The core difference between Evocative and the Focused Critiques is that Evocative homes in on one core aspect of the art - that is emotive expression - which we found was extremely lacking in the 1400+ EXPOSE’ 1 entries. Evocative is a macro level forum where suggestions and critiques will be made on a high level rather than the nitty gritty technicalities.

Hopefully that clears up any misconceptions about what this forum is about.

Leonard.


#23

This is an excellent idea that will most likely raise the bar for critiques as well as the artwork being ‘processed’ herein - if everything works out.

This macro level property of art is what it’s all about in the end. I also strongly believe that people will never be able to excel in their work until they have transcended beyond the technical aspects of 3D in particular.

Looking forward to see how this develops.


#24

Oo, somewhere to hide from the dread phrase WIREZ PLZ. This has arrived at a good time for me; I’m in the early stages of a new project that’ll benefit no end from some critical input.

Finally a chance to critique ideas and intentions rather than bleedin’ polygons. :wink:


#25

oh by the way does someone know good books or a couple of websites about this stuff? The article was great but too short :wink: I’ve had some of this in college but i’d like to know more about it.


#26

im working on an animation for my thesis project. I’ve done most the models and have done the storyboards. Would it be a good idea to post my storyboards and maybe get tips as to the emotion that should be portrayed before I start animating?


#27

Originally posted by Leonard
[B]
Hopefully that clears up any misconceptions about what this forum is about.

Leonard. [/B]

Leo-

Thank you for the detailed explanation. I do wish you all luck in this new endeavor, and I know the benefits will greatly outweigh the complications.

-Matt


#28

Awesome, I’m excited to see where this forum goes.

Critiquing storyboards is a good idea.


#29

Phew!

About time, and what a great idea, Mark!!!

CGer’s aside, this should help pry open the redundant ‘third eyes’ of the (non)admiring masses…

Atwooki


#30

Great idea!
I think this Forum is very much needed.

None of my clients are interested in the technical stuff behind a picture.
They dont care if i modelled all of swedens population from a torus, or if i imported them from poser.

What matters to them is: what does the picture communicate?
Does it communicate?

I used to be an Art Director (Advertising) and when i bought photograpy, illustrations or for that matter pure 3D, i tended to not go for technically perfect stuff.
Anyone can with time/practice/talent become technically skilled.

What sets the great artists apart from the merely good ones seems more intangible.

So i really hope this could be the place to post pitcures that are almost there.


#31

Ah, this is excellent. It will be a great partner to the focused crits forum.
Great idea Mark.


#32

Originally posted by Mark.Snoswell
[B]True – there is a place for sheer technical excellence, no question… but that’s not in short supply. It’s the very soul of the image we are concerned with here. It’s all about how an image reaches out and says something to the viewer.

Even the most technical images can be enhanced when presented with the correct “mood” lighting, and in the right environment. I should post an example of some architectural images and note the things you can do to make even these quite evocative! [/B]

Mark,

Do you think this forum can enhance more abstract work as well as representative and environmental works?


#33

gmask highlights a couple of important points here…
the examples shown are obviously NON-abstract, and while homour is perhaps difficult to get across in the abstract form, emotiveness most definitely isn’t.

Atwooki


#34

I am down with the forum. My skills could always be helped


#35

Originally posted by DanDiaz
[B]Howdy everyone,

In a nutshell, Evocative is a serious, focused critique forum for everyone to learn how to present or ‘evoke’ emotion in your existing artwork.

Dan [/B]

Don’t shoot the messenger, but this kind of stuff can’t be taught.

Mike


#36

I’m really looking forward to seeing this thread develop. Many artists, including myself, put much too much time into the style or detail of a piece, without realizing the importance of the emotions the viewer might experience when they see it.

Once again CGTalk proves it’s above the rest. It’s like schooling without tuition. Thanks for bringing the experience of so many great artists together for all of us to be inspired and learn from.


#37

Don’t shoot the messenger, but this kind of stuff can’t be taught.

I disagree. Understanding and evoking emotion in a piece, especially since that emotional connection is a vital component of the all important bridging device that art is, is simply a matter of looking further than simply creating an image.

Art is at it’s core simply and bridge between artist and viewer. The strength of the connection made is reliant on any number of factors, including but not limited to technical execution of the piece, subject matter etc. That coupled with the interests and experiences of the viewer goes to establish the strength of the connection. Emotional content is just another factor that helps bridge that gap.

Emotion also happens to be one of the basest communicators we as humans posses. We can, without the use of higher forms of communication like language, gauge a person’s mood or more to the point emotional state with but a glance. Add to that, the socio-biological component of empathy, (Based on the idea that as a societal animal we must understand and share the emotional states of other individual components of a society so the society may survive as a whole.) ergo, emotions cross many many more boundries than things like subject matter and technical execution do, making emotional content a stronger commuicator than most other elements of art. That being said, there are in fact broad elements, colors, compositional tricks etc. that can be used to specifically direct a person’s emotional state.

Take for instance the color red. Red gets our attention solely because of the fact our blood is red. We’re biologically hard-wired to respond to red as a survial trait. Society has used that little quirk in our make-up to astronomical degrees. Stop signs, fast cars, lipstick, advertisments, even governmental movements, all have used the color red solely because it’s such an arresting color to the human race.

What about underpainting? Every wonder why sepia is the color of choice? Because it creates a warm color-palette throughout the image and we as humans associate “warm” with “alive” (Ruddy cheeks, red nose, warm lips.) and we as humans are attracted, again because we are a social animal, to other living things. Use a cool underpainting and the painting looks “dead” or unattractive.

What about numbers? Today’s society is ruled by numbers, yet they’re so common they tend to fade into our subconcious. Add a number to a piece and you’ve established identity or importance, created intrigue in the painting and interest in your viewer.

These are not mysterious tricks, or unlearnable traits. It’s simply a matter of first understanding the way the mind works, then using that knowledge to better your art. I call it “Thinking before creating” or more simply the “Why” of art and for those that want to learn it’s one of the most powerful tools in your tool box.

This forum is a brilliant torch for those that wish to bring so powerful an element into their work. Bravo Mark and Dan and bravo cgtalk for not only seeing the need but also taking the initiative to make it happen.

You can better believe I’ll be here, preaching and teaching.

Brian


#38

Nice idea!

Art is feeling. :slight_smile:


#39

Fantastic Read,
i really hope this new forum will bring out some truly awsome tallent and works… (even better then before)

I Wish All Good Luck, and Really Hope they can get out of the forum that they want to.


#40

I think artistic critique is nothing but a good thing. It’s a shame that such analysis needs it’s own forum, (i.e - more and more segregation), but such is the way of things!

I do wish that you hadn’t made all of your examples Exposé related. You’ll have to forgive my cynicism (again!), but your article does read a little like “we need you to give us more artwork for our next book - buck up your ideas!”