Manhunt blamed!


#21

Why do people buy GTA and manhunt? Well I can only speak for myself and say for entertainment. If you don’t like it thats fine, don’t buy it but don’t try and take it away from me. I know that killing people/beating the crap out of someone/ and the majority of things you do in these games are wrong to do in real life but thats just it, its not real. To me its just a fantasy world where you can do what you want. I’ve played violent games (of their time), watched violent movies, and played “war” with my friends since I was alittle kid but I don’t go around doing any of these things. How people act is based on only how they were raised and if they choose to be strong enough to resist negative influences. Where in this story does it say anything from the murder? All we have is a third hand account from the victim’s mother on what a friend of the murder said. For all we know he could just be a freaking lune, maybe the kid just pissed him off. There are alot of aspects of the story that we don’t know and probably won’t, but the reporter heard the kid liked a game so they just focused on that.


#22

I think the content is a bit of a problem. Yes they could do a movie with a similar storyline, but not to the level of violence you see in a game like Manhunt, and films, television and books are passive entertainment. You couldn’t make a movie that featured 50 beheadings via baseballbat, 72 impalements with a crowbar, 80 eviscerations with a glass shard, 36 suffocations with a plastic bag, and 40 murders via nailgun, but it’s perfectly fine to do it in a game in gruesome detai, and whats more the viewer is allowed to participate in it…

I’m not for banning these games but I do think there is some social responsibility to be shared by the companies that put them out. Maybe along the lines of cigarrette companies, they should be made to fund programs for education or mental health or something.


#23

Manhunt is a boring and stupid game, certainly not the hit Rockstar had thought it would be. They have been unable to replicate what Grand Tefth Auto has been in sales anyway. The next GTA will be very controversial too because it’s basicly the movie “Menace To Society” in a videogame (which somehow makes it more evil).

In the case of the murder mentioned in the article, the problem was not with the boring game Manhunt, but with the inability of social workers, school officials, and the parents of the murderer, to realize that the kid had serious mental problems. If it wasn’t for the game, maybe he wouldn’t have killed anyone with a hammer, but he would have continued to live a life with the exessive mental problems he has, most likely causing a lot of harm to many people throughout his life. It’s too bad that it took a murder for him to be spotted as a dangerous person.

On a side note, here is a story that [b]should definitly be heard[/b]: One of my friend has a brother who has always had an extremely odd behavior. When he was young, he would torture animals (kill birds and cats, etc), and get into fits of rage (he once stabbed one of his friends over a french toast). His brother has always been a great guy, perfectly normal, wouldn't hurt a fly, yet both have been raised by the same person in the same way. As he grew up the problems became worst to a point where he needed to be kept away from his familly. He turned out to be manic depressive (heard voices, said things that made no sense, etc). His situation has never gotten better, he's fried mentally. That all started when we were very young, and there were no violent videogames whatsoever back then. If he had lived surrounded by games like Manhunt, yes it could have affected his behavior, but only because of his mental state which was NOT caused by the games.

#24

There are good games and bad games.

How to murder somebody and surgically remove all edvidence from the scene of the crime is not a good game idea to develope on, and not something people should be a master of.


#25

“If he had lived surrounded by games like Manhunt, yes it could have affected his behavior, but only because of his mental state which was NOT caused by the games.”
Agree completely.

Alas, let us ban the use of mini skirts and very provocative tops on women, because u know, there ARE maniacs out there that DO rape women. Provocative dressing can and does most times lead them to act. That does not make the clothes responsible for the rape.

And the list could go on and on and on, u know…


#26

Why should these companies be made to do anything like that? While I agree it would be a nice gesture I don’t think they should be forced to do it. I think having the game rated as mature is all that should be forced on them.

Thats only half of the equation. The other half is the person themselve. Does he/she have what it takes to make the right choice?

Another thing is, this is the 2nd or 3rd case where I’ve heard of a rockstar game being blamed. Now I ask if they’re are a few million copies of each game (gta 3,4 and manhunt) why are they’re so few cases blamed on this? Point is its not the game/movie/music its the person. If we stopped scapegoating everything and take self responsibilty things would be much better.


#27

Stefan’s mother described Leblanc, who confessed to police moments after the assault, as “inherently evil”.

I’m sorry… but why is your kid associated with someone like that?? I understand that as a parent you can’t control your kid 24/7. However, I’d be willing to bet if you punish your kid enough and severe enough if they associate with people you don’t want them too, they’d not associate with them. If they do, then you aren’t punishing them enough. It would seem that the 2 would not be in the same classes at school, etc, so exposure to them could’ve been controlled easier than say another 14yr old.

That’s the #1 problem I see today. Kids aren’t getting the butt whoppins they deserve. We are teaching our children that it’s ok to be off the wall nuts and all behavior is acceptable because it shows “indivduality”.

There’s a such thing as just a “bad seed”. Why can’t people seem to grasp that. Some people are just worthless piles of crap and NO MATTER what, they are going to do bad things.

Anybody know what video game did Jeffery Dahmer play to make him kill all those people? Maybe it was Pole Position, you know, the car explosions really leave an imprint in your mind.


#28

How to murder somebody and surgically remove all edvidence from the scene of the crime is not a good game idea to develope on, and not something people should be a master of.

Why not?

I’ll go out on a limb and say that someone that had that ablitity could use it to “solve” and maybe prevent crimes of that nature from happening.

You have to know how to do something, what something looks like inorder to fix it, prevent it etc.

I mean, a bomb expert needs to know how to make a bomb inorder to dismantle one.

With great power, comes great responsiblity.

It’s what we chose to do with it…


#29

I’m with you Slurry. Look, I don’t think parents’ should be able to blame per say video game makers, heck, how the game get in to the hands of the kids anyway? However, I think it’s absolutely ridiculous and sickning that games by Rock Star, that not only take the very depravity of society (murder, drugs, prostitution, etc.) and puts them in a game, but glorifies them. It’s beyond me to think the “heros” in these games are nothing more than societies cold blooded killers. And in the games you get rewarded for it. :sad: Sorry, I can’t stand Rock Star.


#30

That’s the problem, for the most part, people don’t want to do something positive with it. I think game sales from games like this prove it.


#31

Heh. Why blame Manhunt and not Bugs Bunny?

Manhunt: Hammers kill people.

Bugs Bunny: Hammers make bad guys look dumb.


#32

blame me
blame you
blame everyone
blame no one

blame, no matter its target, has the same results.

I am not a parent, yet. I can tell you this though (even you parents are there who already posted and now think what I say is meaningless because I’m not a parent and " I just don’t know…" like you’re some Vietnam vet… Opps, sorry. Got on a rant there for a minute. Back to the post.)

My mom and dad used to tell me these stories of their life up through their college years when I was growing up, especially during my teenage years. It wasn’t of their successes most of the time. On the contrary, it was of their hardships and their failures. They would do this periodically and back then I thought they were those “When I was your age…” stories designed to make me feel guilty that my life is easier then they had it.

I’m older now, and I couldn’t have been more wrong about their intent. Looking back I realize that I did not make the same mistakes they had. I had known better. I had made the right choice sometimes even when it was not obvious because I had the knowledge of what the choice might lead to. It was the experience of my parents that helped me.

They didn’t censor me. They didn’t question my morals. They just told me of their experience and let me decide for myself.

Parents don’t ask “What went wrong?” when your kids make a mistake. Ask “What went wrong?” when your kids make the same mistake you did.

-B


#33

Okay spiderman, who in the hell goes to the video game store looking to buy game so they could be educated in brutal crime solving?


#34

Okay Einstein, who the hell goes to the video game store looking to buy a game so they could be educated in brutal crime? I didn’t play Grand Theft Auto to learn how to jack cars or gun people down. Who is playing Manhunt to learn how to murder?

The game is not the problem. Manhunt is a blip on the radar compared to the flood of violence the kid’s already seen on TV and in movies. Do you really think somebody is going to be educated or inspired by Manhunt after watching violence on TV for 15 years? The game is just a symptom of the problem, not a cause. Until people get over their fixation with violence - which seems born and bred into people - games like Manhunt will appear to satisfy that fixation. If anything, I’d say a game like Manhunt could prevent acts of aggression by giving people an outlet for it.


#35

Just going to make a quick reply.

It’s not the video-game industry’s responsibility to raise children, it’s the parents’. You can choose to use discression or not when parenting.


#36

You are so far from the truth IMHO that I truly hope others do not listen and take heed to what you have just stated…

First off, punishment, as you call it, should fit the crime eh… and since violence begets more violence, well, I will let you figure the rest of that one out if you are able to…

Next, we would suggest here that perhaps “consequences”, for one’s actions would be a better term to use than “punshiment”

Moreover… honest, open communication with your children is always best policy… saves on a whole lot of consequences eh :wink:

we have three children, two who are young teenagers, and one just about to become so, and I would like to suggest that, no, all is not Mr Rogers perfect like… lol… they are all boys, and have terrific imaginations, and zeal for life and fun… however, we as parents, have the responcibility to ensure that they are well informed, well behaved whenever possible, and generally do not pose menace to themselves or onto others…

having said this, it is also understood that though there are boundries, these boundries are somewhat flexible depending on the circumstances, and, the surrounding enviroment they/we are in at any given time… in other words, we are much more liberal at home in what is acceptable behaviour, than what is expected should we/they be out in the public eye… as in, while at home we do not expect them to tow the line 100% of the time, however, when we all go out somewhere, we do expect best behaviour, as well, when they are out at thier friends, or at school etc. , we expect best behaviour to be shown… with the consequences for anything less than, for them to be subsequently reigned in a bit, with some normal given privileges lost for the remaining of the day… tommorow brings a new day… fresh start :slight_smile:

It is all up to open, honest, communication, and establishing a general understanding between each other, which is to be sacred… or, in otherwords, respected and trusted … :slight_smile:

They should not have to fear “Punishment”, but rather understand “consequences”…

They should never fear talking to you, but rather, you should be the one’s they can always come to, with anything… even if, heaven forbid, they have committed a crime, they should still trust that you will help them better understand which is the best route to take… because they ultimately have trust in you, to do the right thing, so as to understand for themselves, by influence from you, in just what is " right" and what is not…

thus they will be able to take this information and pass it along to their children etc…

So… if you believe that violence is the “right” answer, then I would strongly suggest that you “break that cycle now”… violence is wrong… be it against children, women, or your fellow man… period.

Any excuse for violence is just that, an excuse… a justification for a set of actions which only serves to perpetrate further reactions with similar outcome… neandrathal mentality at best, showing that those who act in this manner do not have the resources to better equate a more suitable solution for any and all, including for themselves.

Education is the key… :slight_smile:


#37

I believe it was Brian Eno who said something close to " Kids don’t get desensitized to violence they get desensitized to medias" about violent flicks and video games.


#38

Xtrude: Thank you for explaining it better than I can. :thumbsup:


#39

I say, teach your kids right from wrong, if they are playing a violent video, teach what is real and whats fantasy. There other kids playing manhunt, that realize it is just a game. MOST IMPORTANTLY THE GUY 17 HE SHOULD KNOW BETTER! i was playing mortal kombat and doom at 17, i don’t have the urge to go rip some ones head off.


#40

Why does there always have to be a “cause”? Why can’t crazy people just be crazy?

I keep seeing people mention “realistic graphics”. That has nothing to do with it, remember when they tried to blame the Columbine tragedy on Doom?

If it wasn’t videogames being blamed, it’d be something else, like Tom the cat chasing Jerry the mouse with a hammer. Always anything except the parent(s). Think about how many times on the news you’ve heard about a kid committing a school shooting or violent crime. How many times have you seen one of the parents saying, “It’s all my fault. I never spent enough time with my son/daughter…”

Most of us here grew up playing violent videogames and seeing violent films and television shows. How many of us are brutal criminals?