Manhunt blamed!


#1

surprise surprise, another blame it on the games accusations has appeared in the news in the UK, over a teenage hammer murderer,

The mother of the murdered child (not the murderer) has said all violent games should be banned,

the entire news article is here

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/leicestershire/3934277.stm

Not good for rockstar as they seem to be shrouded in contreversy about the violence they “promote”,


#2

However, we reject any suggestion or association between the tragic events and the sale of the video game Manhunt.

We shouldn’t be bothered with trivial things like social responsibility when there is money to be made.
:rolleyes:


#3

Possibly if you think that way, but im with them on this one, the people are shifting the blame, and will eventually try and sue no doubt. Its just another way of shifting responsibilities and trying to blame everything else but the actual problem


#4

IDIOTS!
They forget that is their responsability to raise and educate and teach what’t good and what’s not to their childrens. Censorship is not good and is not the answare!


#5

people that go out and kill people after playing a computer game are completely nuts to begin with… he is also 17, NOT OLD ENOUGH TO LEGALLY BUY THE GAME… his parents should of stopped him

a game doesn’t make normal people do anything


#6

a game doesn’t make normal people do anything

erm…Hentai games? Just kidding.

Blaming a game for the comportments of your child is openly claiming you’re a failure as a parent.

Most of us in here have played games since the Atari days and we’re all…urm,well,normal :wink:


#7

I always find these stories so incredibly frustrating. If a video game can wield more influence over a child than their own parents, whose fault is that? What happened to parental responsibility? By the time a child is old enough to play video games, they should be reasonably well adjusted, and certainly understand right and wrong.

The people who complain so loudly about the negative influence of video games/movies/television have got to be the same people who give NONE of the necessary guidance, nurturing, and discipline required to raise a human being. They are satified with only having to deal with the financial responsibility of raising a child. “What’s that, you need a new video game so you can hide out in your room and not bother me for a few hours at a time? Here’s 50 bucks.”

But, as soon as the s*!t hits the fan, these same parents are awfully quick to dodge any blame, and look for any other source as the ultimate cause. I could go on and on about this topic, but i’ll spare you all from my frustrated ranting.

Rob


#8

I’m pretty sure we had murders way before we had video games and movies…


#9

Just a slow news day, don’t worry about it. The Daily Mail will be back to immigration scares, crime statistics, and celebrity sex scandals before you can say “lazy, ignorant, knee-jerk tabloid journalism”.


#10

Hey Everybody,

I am the first one to agree that music, games, TV, film, etc is not the sole reason for why people do bad things. However, there is a thing call conditioning and desensitising. Am I the only one who finds it a little disturbing that Rockstar games seem to exclusively create game titles based on excessive violence towards people?
I know, I know…most games have a violent nature to them. But this isn’t shooting up aliens or monsters…good vs evil. Their games encourage you to take on the role of a social deviant and dish out bodily harm to everyday people. I think it’s sad that they are so eager to profit from such negative role-play. It’s easy to pander to the lowest common denominator.
As premature as it is to solely blame modern media for all the worlds problems, it is also premature and dangerous to completely exonerate it’s impact.
And as far as controlling what your kids watch, play and do…that is impossible to do unless you keep the child locked up 24-7.
Say you are a perfect parent and you somehow manage to control everything your child sees and hears while at home. What do you do when the kid is at a friend’s house? Maybe the friend is 18 and can ‘legally’ purchase this Manhunt game. Do you expect your kid to say, “Nope, I can’t play that…I don’t turn 18 until next month…it would be wrong.”
C’mon people, get real. Kids push the boundaries of what is allowed. Has nobody from this thread tried an alcoholic beverage or cigarette before they were legal age? Maybe take the parent’s car for a quick spin around the block?
I think in the effort to dismiss the effect media has on children (especially in an era of dual-income families) some of you are exhibiting idealistic and unreasonable points of view.
Like I said, I don’t think anybody would go out and commit a crime after hearing a song or playing a game…but if the person played it over and over and over and over…stuff like that has an effect.
Pick up a psych 101 book. Read about Pavlov’s dog…
This is not a black and white issue. There are many shades of grey and many contributing factors. All I am asking is that we all keep an open mind. Banning certain games is not necessarily the answer. I am not a fan of censorship. But let’s think about what passes as entertainment and what price we are willing to put on our ethics, principles and morals.

Whew! OK, getting off the soap box.
Sorry for the long post…:thumbsup:


#11

Theres a 18 year old age requirement to get the game, thats all the responsiblity the company needs to take. Do you expect the company to include a “top 10 reasons why not to kill someone in real life” pamplet? There are only two places to put the blame, on the parents and on the kid himself. This just seems like a way for the parents of the murdered kid to get set up to sue.


#12

killing is wrong… games aren’t real
if you kill after playing violent games… you’re a nutter

whether they are shocked by violence or not… they should know that in real life it’s wrong to take someone’s life… that’s even shown in GTA to some extent… if you’ve ever played that game you’ll know that if you get more than 3 stars you get chased down by the FBI :smiley:


#13

Slurry: PLEASE do not take my response personally! I just wanted to give this warning so you know I’m not going after ya. I think your points are justified but also need response.

Ok, on with the response! :thumbsup:

Possible counter arguments:

  1. Games allow users to explore scenarios they would never consider in real life.
  2. Supply and Demand: Rockstar would not make them if they didn’t sell.

I know, I know…most games have a violent nature to them. But this isn’t shooting up aliens or monsters…good vs evil. Their games encourage you to take on the role of a social deviant and dish out bodily harm to everyday people. I think it’s sad that they are so eager to profit from such negative role-play. It’s easy to pander to the lowest common denominator.

Morbid curiousity. Everyone stares at the car crash except the one’s who see them regularly. Its the curious of seeing something new or “What happens next?” that draws almost everyone.

As premature as it is to solely blame modern media for all the worlds problems, it is also premature and dangerous to completely exonerate it’s impact.
And as far as controlling what your kids watch, play and do…that is impossible to do unless you keep the child locked up 24-7.
Say you are a perfect parent and you somehow manage to control everything your child sees and hears while at home. What do you do when the kid is at a friend’s house? Maybe the friend is 18 and can ‘legally’ purchase this Manhunt game. Do you expect your kid to say, “Nope, I can’t play that…I don’t turn 18 until next month…it would be wrong.”
C’mon people, get real. Kids push the boundaries of what is allowed. Has nobody from this thread tried an alcoholic beverage or cigarette before they were legal age? Maybe take the parent’s car for a quick spin around the block?

Slurry: You sidestepped a very serious issue here. As you pointed out. Kids push boundaries. Once they get a certain age, you can’t control them 24/7 anymore. This is what I’m afraid many people are beginning to forget about parenting. It isn’t as important what your kids learn, as how they learn. How they live their lives is much more important than what they learn. Teach kids self-dicipline and responsibility, and these problems “magically” go away.

I think in the effort to dismiss the effect media has on children (especially in an era of dual-income families) some of you are exhibiting idealistic and unreasonable points of view.

Again, kids learn the most from their parents. If the parents teach self-dicipline and use it in their own lives, the kids learn its importance. If the parents don’t use enough self-dicipline themselves, how can they ever expect the kids to behave better?

Like I said, I don’t think anybody would go out and commit a crime after hearing a song or playing a game…but if the person played it over and over and over and over…stuff like that has an effect.

Again, good parenting and letting the kid have an open mind trumps this easily.

This is not a black and white issue. There are many shades of grey and many contributing factors. All I am asking is that we all keep an open mind. Banning certain games is not necessarily the answer. I am not a fan of censorship. But let’s think about what passes as entertainment and what price we are willing to put on our ethics, principles and morals.

Agreed, this issue isn’t simple. This issue isn’t new either. In fact, this issue is several thousand years old. No miracle cures will fix it. No breakthroughs in science will find us a solution. We already have one:

[b]Raise your $%^&*#$ kid so that he/she would make the same (or better) choices in life.

[/b]The rest seems to fix itself. :slight_smile:

Whew! OK, getting off the soap box.
Sorry for the long post…:thumbsup:
Yeah, that took way longer than I wanted too… :smiley:

PS: For more information, please watch Pixar’s Finding Nemo if you haven’t already. It has a good lesson for parents.


#14

Slurry, well put.

Vigoro, also well said.

This type of thread keeps coming up every now and again, and ususally ends up being a billion pages long, with everyone weighing in their opion of free speach and their personal affinity for destruction/or not. I’ve never posted on this topic because ultimately, it is a very grey subject which can be so cyclical.

My take on it is one that I apply to lots of stuff these days. I don’t waste any time looking to government to fix or fund or regulate my reality. I “vote with my feet”, and I wish more people would do the same. If you don’t like something, don’t do it. If you do like something that others may not, respect their right to disagree, AND make an effort to not get too much in their space. When it comes to games, the dollar will ultimately decide what floats and what sinks, regardless of efforts to sway it one way or another, so support what you’d like to see more of…

e.


#15

I have to agree with Slurry. My wife and I are in the progress of raising 2 kids (3 any day now) and try very hard to raise them according to a high moral standard. How does this stuff help this? This kind of “entertainment” is not edifying in any way. It is simply ment to cater to the immature and/or social rebels and generate money. It undermines everything that I teach my child is wrong. I teach my kids that killing/stealing/violent agression towards the innocent…are imoral and should not be toyed with, and then little Billy across the street has parents that do not feel this way and I get to explain to my child why Billy’s parents let him play with this kind of stuff. And as Billy grows, what kind of ideas do you suppose enter his mind when he gets upset and his human nature seeks revenge? But, whether you believe these games are impacting or not, what is the point to them. Why do live in a society that buys this crap (and I mean that on a global scale). You say it is up to the parents to control their children in these matters, yet what does that say to all of you (or your parents) who play these games. So you are now over 18, why is this entertaining to you? Weren’t you ever taught this stuff is wrong? Or is that why it is entertainig? I don’t believe that Rockstar is trying to push any political or social agenda through these things, they are simply exploiting a trend in todays society in order to satisfy their own desire for money. So while all of you sit around and defend them in this and perhaps even contribute to it, let me ask you this, why? What possible good can come from these things. At least a violent bloody game about war, or aliens can in some stretch of the imagination be seen to promote a sense of good triumphing evil.

But then again, if you don’t have children, or if you choose to believe that there is no good or evil, or that any and all subject matter should, by right of humanity, be made freely available and accessable to all, then I guess it doesn’t really matter…


#16

I have to agree with Slurry and yeah squidinc, thats true and look who suffers. nevertheless, violence as entertainment is here to stay. So gaurd your children, lock your doors, and trust nobody. This is the world the buyers of this media choose. Why? Because these buyers are entertained by violence that causes people to gaurd thier children, lock thier doors and tust no one. Unfortunatly some have an insatiable appetite for violence and this media is thier first source to desensitising to the point where it’s too late.

I agree that you can’t blame the game, but it is a fact that makers of some of these games are socially apathetic. They care about finding stupid people to buy thier stupid games. That’s it.


#17

Violent video games are a problem, but if you let your son buy the game. You are as much at fault as the developer.


#18

blame the hammer.

blame the steel workers that made the head. blame the lumber industry that harvested materials for the handle.

blame everyone but yourself.

while it is ‘just a game’, there is a responsibility towards both the consumer, the publisher and the distributer to educate themselves and each other, on the impact and use of the product.

the medium is not the problem, nor is the content. the same storyline and extreme events could easily be transcribed into a film, a novel, a webpage or a comic book. the same vein of events are portrayed in biblical fiction and on the evening news.

there is a gray line somwhere in the middle where both the problem and solution lie. as long as everybody is on both sides of the fence, we are not any closer to finding the solution that lies on the dividing line.


#19
  1. Supply and Demand: Rockstar would not make them if they didn’t sell.
    While reading this I got a sudden flash of a Joe Dirt look-alike saying, “Hell, y’all, do ya think I’d be makin’ this here crystal meth if’n I couldn’t sell it?”

I would venture to say that anyone who thinks this issue is as simple as “Teach your children well” has never raised a child to the ripe old age of 21.

-Ran
father of 3, 2 of which are fine upstanding citizens, the third, although good-at-heart, may still one day be a fine upstanding citizen if he can stay out of jail long enough. :frowning:

(oh…and grand-father of 2)


#20

Some of you are missing the point a bit. It’s all very well screaming “It’s the parent’s responsibility!”, but no matter how responsible a parent may be they will never have any control over other people’s kids. Don’t forget, the woman calling for this game to be banned is the mother of the victim, not the killer, and there’s no suggestion whatsoever that she was a bad parent who let her late son play violent games.

Of course, that’s not to say the story itself isn’t just typical tabloid scapegoating.