Just started my own online rigging company


#1

I would really like some suggestionss and advice. It’s a big world out there :slight_smile:
time to make my own space…
rigalot.com


#2

Create badass portofolio of clients work. Also, I would ditch ‘in 24h you will have production rig’ as it is can only attractable to super low budget projects with need on speed rather than quality.


#3

Thanks armangsb!
Its unfortunate that most of my rigs are under strict NDA’s… So I’m having trouble with portfolios.
I understand the issue with having the ‘Under 24 hours’ will make it look like its for low budget places, but I do feel like its a hook, and I need a hook surely if I start off, yeah? :slight_smile:


#4

The problem is you may get stuck on your own hook…

The kind of work you do… is the kind of work you do, ie once you get known for fast or cheap work it’s very difficult to then persuade your clients to pay you for higher quality work.
I’m speaking from experience as a while ago I started turning down a particular kind of client as I was fed up of doing low budget work where I never ended up with work I’d want to show on a reel or that I felt proud of. I went through a pretty lean period as I up-skilled then and tried to attract better work. It’s recently starting to pay off but it wasn’t a fun transition and I’m glad I had some savings to keep me going…

Cheers,
Brian


#5

One other point that occurs to me looking at your site - saying ‘RIGALOT is not responsible for unwanted deformations due to insufficient or misplaced vertices.’ feels a bit of a cop-out to me.

When I’ve worked as a rigger I’ll nearly always have some back and forth with the modeller to get the mesh just right as I build the rig. I would never just say to a client ‘well the model isn’t going to deform wll because it’s not modeled well’, instead I would suggest to them how it can be improved and then update the rig as they fix issues.


#6

Thanks, Horganovski!

You are absolutely right. Thanks so much for the advice, I’m gonna change things right now.
I’m also just modelling some of my own characters to rig and animate to fill up the show reel.


#7

The first control (body_Ctrl) I rotated in your example rig broke the mesh. Unless you want the spine to look like this?


#8

How Embarrassing!
Thanks for pointing that out. I’ve since fixed that issue, please go ahead and download the rig again.
https://www.rigalot.com/

cheers


#9

you should definitly make some videos of a good looking character with a rig to see what we can do with it, most company don’t have time to test rig, neither do they want to before they see what it does. I know that’s the first thing I search on your website and couldn’t find it. just my 2cts.
good luck in this new adventure.


#10

Thanks, Mate!
I’ll definitely put that in.
All my Rigs are under NDA at the moment, so I’m looking for some models I can rig and show off. Do you have one?


#11

Google for “creative commons 3d models”, you can find lots of decent models with licenses that allow redistribution. I’d recommend starting with a model that doesn’t have skinning, so people know that the mesh skinning in the rig is part of what you’re creating and that you didn’t just use someone else’s skin painting work. I’d also recommend sticking with the “commercial use allowed” models (whether or not it’s strictly commercial use, you’re using it to advertise yourself).

One other point that occurs to me looking at your site - saying ‘RIGALOT is not responsible for unwanted deformations due to insufficient or
misplaced vertices.’ feels a bit of a cop-out to me.

It’s important to remember that “disclaimers” like this really don’t help you. If somebody thinks something is your fault, it doesn’t matter how many disclaimers you’ve put on your site, they’re still not going to work with you again. This particular one just makes me think “how often does he get blamed for things that he says this on his site?”. After all, if the mesh has issues that make it hard to rig, people would expect you to tell them about that quickly, not just give them back something broken…

And ultimately, if you’re trying to have 24-hour turnaround, you’re going to end up with a lot of mediocre rigs. It doesn’t matter how good you are, that’s not enough time to let you go back to people and point out issues in the mesh that need to be fixed. I think that’s an inherent problem you’ll have–and bear in mind, do people really need 24-hour turnaround on a model they spent a week on? I’d rather somebody stop, send me an email explaining a problem and let me fix it before they continue, than have them push forwards to get it done same-day even though it has problems. To me, “24 hour” just translates to “rush job”…