I've barely used Maya since 2013 - what's new and what do I need to know?


#1

For one, it seems like mentalray is no longer a thing and hardware rendering is all the rage (cycles, redshift). I’ve been out of the loop with 3D for quite a while. Has Maya changed significantly?


#2

@FalseCathedral
obviously yes, check the documentation for each release and look at the “what’s new” tab


#3

What do you think about alternatives to autodesk maya? Found only this https://alternativemaster.com/alternatives-to-autodesk-maya


#4

There are many alternatives depending what you are trying to do, for film work and game Maya is still the standard software in the industry and the most capable.


#5

i am stuck to maya 2013 since i have tried maya2016-2018-2019 and dislike arnold

i would not use last maya versions only tuning layout and removing essential features such as mental ray

best maya versions are 2008/2009/2012/2013 : stable, fast, packing whole cg resources in kernel

latest maya multiply useless gadgets embedding known process


#6

Maya 2020 is rock-solid and very wonderful, with tons of new features that I use all the time. I went from Maya 2009 to 2012 to 2015, then waited five years to update it until they had features I liked and wanted (MASH, mostly).

As for rendering engines, I use Vray and also don’t care for Arnold, but Arnold can do everything mental ray could so there’s really no reason not to upgrade. It’s also much, much faster (so is Vray) than mental ever was.


#7

@undersiege
lol


#8

i consider mental ray faster than arnold furthermore none of mental ray shaders is processable through arnold needing to reset whole scene


#9

Mental ray is faster than Arnold, no doubt. But it is also full of bug and needs a ton of workarounds. I used mental ray for 10 years and after the switch to Arnold my life became way easier.


#10

@undersiege
god, so in 20 years are you going to still show this old comparison from 2017? you are aware that things are evolving no? and that shit tons of updates and optimizations on the Arnold side no?
seriously


#11

What’s changed???

LOL

It’s still the same software, nothings changed but integration of plugins. It’s still the same horrendously buggy software with no innovation and outdated workflows and ancient modelling tools.

Moved to UE4, it has it’s own issues, but the pace of development is lightyears apart between the two.

Maya is a dinosaur on life support relying on updates from plugins. Sounds familiar? Revit, 3DS Max…wonder what they all have in common? Hmmm


#12

@Hamburger

hahah you really don’t know what you are talking about, this is really the most retarded comparison i’ve ever seen
it’s like saying i’m switching from maya to excel :joy:.
A complete nonsense, different tasks.


#13

Righto bro…

Auto industry…real time
ArchViz…real time
It’ll eventually move more and more industries…and what, Maya still can’t extrude along path in 2021…

Devs are long gone, Alias used to be huge, almost 500 people… Maya’s peak was almost 20 years ago in 2005/2006 when actively developed from 1997+ era…it’ll be around for another 10-20 years but Maya’s days are numbered. It’s on life support with plugin updates

So if you’re talking about excel, it’s apt…every product cycle reaches an end. But yeah, to answer the original OP, what’s changed since 2013??? Not much

All IMO


#14

@Hamburger
you are ridiculous man, you are taking your tiny use case (Archviz) and making a stupid generality.
it’s not that hard to go and check the documentation to see all the updates since 2013.
And not using these features doesn’t mean nothing has been done since 2013, this is just plain stupidity.


#15

USD support is new

component tags finally decouples rigging from modeling

faster startup

faster viewport and animation caching

arnold

modeling toolkit and other modern modeling tools

new render layer managment - called render setup

animation layers

node editor

new graph editor

bifrost

lots of bug fixes

support for lots of new standards