is it worth it?


#4

I’m guessing ‘pain’ is a reference to the personal sacrifice, struggle and effort involved in getting to a level of ability/knowledge that allows you to compete on a professional level. As someone who deals with actual physical pain much of the time I find study and work a good distraction, it’s almost a form of therapy for me, so I can’t directly agree that that’s really the case but I think I get where you are coming from.

To be blunt though, the only person who can really answer that question for you is yourself. Others can give you their opinions and discuss their experiences but that has no real bearing on anybody else as we are all different mentally, culturally, emotionally etc. If the work you do doesn’t give you the sense of satisfaction that you need to make up for the late nights etc then maybe you do need to consider other options. Life is short and it’s important to do what you enjoy if you can. All pain and no fun is not the way to go.

Just my 2c of course…
Cheers,
Brian


#5

If it is such a pain for you … no. That simple.


#6

If you can’t be in it for the love of it, then: No.


#7

If you are doubting yourself like that, then most likely no.


#8

You never stated what you’re trying to do. Your post is vague and overly dramatic, which is why we respond the way we do.

Take it easy. Go outside, and when you come back, have a little fun with art. If you’re worried that all of your eggs are on one basket… them don’t put all of your eggs in one basket! Avoid tunnel vision… just relax and be flexible you never know what niche career you’ll end up in. It may not be CG, but on some cases that may work out better for you… and who knows, maybe you’ll be able to use some of that skill set anyway.


#9

Honestly, I sometimes wonder about people getting into this field, and thinking that its anything other than a highly specialized technical profession.

Like any skilled profession, its not easy. Its not supposed to be. If it were easy, it wouldn’t be a skilled profession.

Is it worth it? Yes. Being a CG Artist is worth it, because its something that I love doing-and if I didn’t love doing it, I would have chosen another career path. And until I stop loving it, it will continue to be worth it.

It has put food on my table, a roof over my head, and petrol in my car. But its a job. Any job is going to be difficult to get to the top of your game. There is as much competition out there for restaurant owners and chefs, for doctors, engineers, teachers, accountants, lawyers, as there is for CG artists.


#10

Nah…it’s too painfull. And dangerous. But also dramatic. And never repetitive or boring. Never1!!!1111


#11

And there are Splosions, so its not good.


#12

Pyke
Anything is a technical profession at some point. You become crafty at some point, producing something with less efforts and learning. There is less exploration at that point, but it’s what makes life easier. I also agree it’s a good field in terms of pay, compared to other fields (for the time being). Maybe I’d choose skiing or something else, but would it pay the bills?


#13

I think your question would be more interesting if it is about whether it is worth to spend your time with something you really love but is not paid enough to survive while working something you don’t like pays for your living and takes away the time to do what you like.

Most of the people will stop doing their jobs if not paid while true artists will still create regardless being paid or not. They can’t stop it and this may be devastating for their financial and family situation.

I’m writing this thinking about a friend of mine who is over 50 and have been working as a freelance illustrator and designer most of his career. But in the recent years with the outsourcing wave, company mergers, and falling prices, his clients no longer provide the same amount of work and pay as before and in order to survive he is thinking about changing to entirely different profession like a bus driver for example. It is really sad and I don’t know what advice to give him - he seems to be advertising himself well but it is obvious that the available jobs are not enough and the offering is overwhelmingly higher than the demand.


#14

Honestly - only you can answer that.
For many people here, doing what they love is always worth it… considering the alternative.


#15

Still I think most artists hope earning money, otherwise they are just hobbyists. Market dictates jobs, and what’s in demand, gets artists’ attention. Most art work was done commercially. Also what matters is the area has future or not. People sometimes indeed work without pay but they still hope making money one day, because the area they choose has a bright future at that moment. I’m not sure we can say a true artist is someone who works even if he doesn’t get pay and because he loves it so much. It can be amateur also with this attitude.


#16

There is no gain without pain, now get cracking and no slacking.


#17

ahmedadel0077, from your side info:

Your join date is 2008. You are freelancing in Egypt. Your number of post is 320.

Are you burning out? I know the advancement of tools can easily make your prior knowledge moot. New students can easily make what oldskool require few hours to do.

Its like being a programmer old enough to remember (and labour on) punch card, assembly, and other things. And due to hardware upgrade and programming language maturity, new graduates can (to a certain limit) do what is hard previously. There are also market changes.

Before Doom, all game programmers are hard core math genius and coder. But Doom is the start of licensing world, with Strife being the first game to license Doom engine (afaik). UDK in the early days allow artist without much programming experience to actually develop racing game (from the book Game Development Architectures).

And 4th GL language and all.

The same thing can be said with CG, I guess. And may I ask, is your question related to what happening in CG? As in the work went to whoever can do the job cheaper. Is that also happening in Egypt, may I ask? Are you losing freelancing jobs and new jobs are hard to come by?

If it harder to make a living and you are nearing burnout (probably since you are talking about pain and worthiness). Maybe its time to thrown in the towel.

How old are you? What is your hobby? Can you monitize your hobby? For example someone said that you cannot make a living skiing, but you can still be ski instructor.

The reason I’m asking you is that CG for me is a hobby, and currently I’m looking into translating jobs (I do have a certificate in). I also have basic Oracle certificate (database), although currently I’m looking into other plans while finishing my part time study.

I think CG is fun, however I’ll keep my own ‘buts’ to myself for now, not burning bridges and loose lips sink ships and all.


#18

Trust me, burnout is a dangerous things. You could easily be in the ‘undead’ state. Not willing to commit suicide, not willing to actually live.

And I know the amount of training available helps speed up the competitions in the field. There are a saying a week in library saves a year in research or something. Previously you might have to learn things on your own (specially you are in Egypt), and to know cool tips require you to actually work at awesome places. These day you can buy training to get tips from ex-awesome studios animator. For those who willing to put the time, this indeed level the playing field.

And I know its hard to ask for good pay if newbies can almost do the same thing that you do.

There is a thread at Luxology/Modo about how its rigging/animating is on Pixar level (at least that what they said) and there are Pixar(?) guy doing a rigging training, which I hope cover upcoming 701. And also a person that works on Up, Brave and all is writing a modelling and topology book.

Imagine that, a newbie coming out of school with such knowledge and such tools.

So, uh, take it for what is it. I hope I answer your questions.


#19

wrong post sorry :slight_smile:


#20

Not only punch cards, but knowing the Hollerith Code by heart, using flowcharts, programming in COBOL, Fortran IV

back to the topic.
to the original poster, it sounds like a crisis of confidence , somewhat hard to tell by the cryptic post. You are the only one who can make the determine if it is worth it.


#21

OP hasn’t posted since the thread was opened, or shown up in the viewers list the couple times I checked it.
Maybe let it wither and die in peace? :slight_smile:


#22

I guess he felt it wasn’t worth it. :smiley:


#23

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