Is it normal to never be pleased with your work?


#1

Hey, I was wondering if it’s normal for people to never think their work is good enough. I look at all my stuff and I know it’s pretty average, but some people tell me how good it is and I just keep thinking that it sucks. Is this normal or if I think it sucks does that usually mean it sucks. I look at some of the work on these boards in it just awes and inspires me, and I wonder if the person who made it sees it the same way I do.


#2

Believe in your self, compare it to other artists. You should never be satiesfied, you should seek perfection, if what you are drawing is what you mean to draw then it is good, if not keep improving. If an artist where to be satisfied with its work then he would stop producing…now of course you can tell when youve made something cool, but you need to be objective


#3

I hate everything I’ve ever modeled. That’s how it goes - the more you improve, the more your old work looks like crap.


#4

I normaly like somthing iv done just after iv finished it…A week later and I normaly realy dont like it at all, the only things I see after a while are the faults…must try harder


#5

I believe it is normal, this is why we as artist become obsessed and spend countless hours in our craft, even to the point were our life and relationships can suffer. Our obsession and persuit of perfection makes us the starving artist, not because we have to, but because nothing else is more important than the pursuit of perfection. And then we do something terrible, we compare our works to others and no matter what, it seems to never measure up. When we compare our work to others, we unintentionally tend to measure our weaknesses to thier strengths, and we go back to the drawing board a bit depressed wondering why our work isn’t as good.

I believe that those who don’t understand these tendencies can go mad. So the key is to find a balance.

Remember though, perfection is not achievable, however excellence is.


#6

Q: Is it normal to never be pleased with your work?
A: Yes.


#7

I start off really excited with a model. I stop when I’m pleased (or bored) with it. A week later I hate it. I go drinking…wake up outside a 24 hour ASDA wearing womens clothing and covered in vomit. Then go home and start a new (better) project.

Repeat until liver dies.


#8

Cool, I thought I was the only one who did that…


#9

Yes, it’s normal. Now get back to work.

If that doesn’t help, go buy a book called “Art and Fear”. I am not one to recommend books, but this one is imho, an essential book for any artist who suffers from feelings of self doubt, disillusionment, and growing pains. You will buy it. And then you will feel better. And then you will get back to work.

to quote Lung from conceptart.org, “DRAW DRAW DRAW”. Or, in your case, “MODEL MODEL MODEL”!

:wip: <--------- Dave
:argh: <------------- gooms9

-Dave


#10

AcK! Yes SIR!

goes and models his ass off

But seriously, that’s kinda crappy. I’ve gotten to the point sometimes when I question why i’m even trying to learn this stuff because I start a project that i’m really excited about and i start modeling and an hour later I get stuck, and it doesn’t look at all like I hoped it would then I close it and come here to look at other peoples work and all I see are these people who have created such fine pieces of artwork and it seems like they do it almost effortlessly and seems like they never get discouraged. I’ve been doing cg on again off again for like, 2 years now, “only about 9 or 10 months if you’re not including all the off agains” and i’ve made probably 2 pieces that i’m actually proud of. I guess I just have to keep at it and hope that eventually one day it just clicks.


#11

Ever heard the saying “Art is never finished-only abandoned”

I am never happy with all my work-becuase I put so much time and effort into it, that i can pick out every single flaw, misplaced poly, slight texture error, inane wrinkle, duplicated screw…

But deadlines cannot be extended because of my inane rambelings! If the client likes it-then its ‘complete’.


#12

I personaly think in its own way its healthy to be never satisfied. If we where satisfied I dont think we would ever improve as artists.

Although i can say im never happy I can say that over the years and with almost every job/artwork I do Iv improved. Slowly im getting better :slight_smile:


#13

I’m not sure it’ll ever “click” really, seems to me that as you get better you can only see far more clearly exactly why your last project sucked.

One good thing you will get though are what I call “lightbulb moments” where a giant lightbulb appears above your head cartoon-style as something you never quite “got” finally sinks in and makes complete sense.

Those are cool.


#14

It’s perfectly normal as you grow to think poorly of your work. The problem usually is that most of us learn to spot our mistakes faster than we’re capable of fixing the problems. So it seems we almost are moving backwards, since our work looks worse and worse (to us) as we progress. It’s just the way it is, unfortunately.

That said, you REALLY need to be confident in your work. It’s one thing to be aware of your faults, in order to fix them, but it’s another to think so poorly of your work that it shows a lack of confidence. You don’t want to be showing your portfolio to someone and sit there saying “I know this sucks.” They’ll start asking themselves, if it sucks so bad why are you showing it to me in the first place.

One thing that really annoys me is when people show their work that they’re obviously proud of, but they feign “modesty” in order to get people to say “Oh, no that’s really good.” Don’t be that person.


#15

I’m always so ****ing proud of my work that my balls expand sooo much with my ego that they almost explode! :wise:

If someone comes along and says “that’s shit” - they fester and drop off. :sad:


#16

What would be the point of continuing or trying to get better if you were ever fully happy with what you’d done?


#17

I have this problem all the time. Frequently I get disgusted with something and let it sit for a bit and then come back later and salvage/pick up where I left off.

I think its a pretty natural response from perfectionist artists.

-L


#18

One good thing you will get though are what I call “light-bulb moments” where a giant light-bulb appears above your head cartoon-style as something you never quite “got” finally sinks in and makes complete sense.

I had one of those light-bulb moments a few months ago. It was weird. Almost like the whole world started to make sense. I actually went from struggling to make a head, to actually making a really good head in a matter of about an hour. I couldn’t believe it. And from that point on, I guess I just “got” better. It was weird. Not even a gradual “better”. It was pretty much instant. One of the coolest moments in my life.

But anyway, I think all artists are never happy with their work, especially when you go back to it a week or so later.


#19

Dont worry, i hate that guy too. :slight_smile:

Thanks for the encouragement guys, you’ve kinda inspired me to not give this up. But I have a question, how do you know when you’re finished if you can never be truely happy with what you’ve made? Are you just supposed to have this shutoff that says, ok, this is good, theres some mistakes, but I’ll just live with it, post it on cgtalk, and move on?


#20

This is also why so many artists burn out mid project and dont finish so much stuff.

There’s the initial spark of inspiration, the frenzied work, the burn out, the new idea, the abandonment of the old project, then the look back at the old project and hate it.

It’s the circle of art!

It take discipline and experience to stick with something to the end.