Finding Projects/Work to Jump On


#1

I have been looking for good projects to use my skills that are already decent or developing, our collaboration forums on CGS are pretty slow and don’t really seem like a forum to simply post “animator/generalist/etc looking for stuff to do”. I know that paid work is immensely scarce for me since I am still very new and every opening I see wants 5-10 years of industry experience. Maybe CGS could add profile functions like a banner next to our avatars that says “looking for work” or “looking to colab”.

Freelancer.com yielded a decent amount of projects I could probably do though most are highly underbid by foreign artists (I saw an hour long animation project with bids for $500).

Craigslist locally (San Francisco Bay Area) has a handful of postings I could do though very limited information on them.

So are there any other methods for finding collaboration or projects both paid and unpaid? I am probably going to end up being like quite a few of you and pursuing a completely unrelated line of work and letting my CG sit in the back burner while I work to stay afloat.


#2

Hey man,

I fell your pain. :stuck_out_tongue: I’ve given up on trying to do 3D for money, and have been enjoying it as a hobby for the past few years. I’ve found Craigslist to be a decent way to find short film projects. Try searching NYC, LA, Chicago, and Huston. I’ve also contributed to several small projects I found on the Colab forum. It seems if you can build a few connections, you’ll get an email or phone call if someone is starting a new project. I even landed a few hundred dollars of paid product rendering work through a connection I made while contributing to a short film project. There are tons of people who just do this stuff as a hobby.

On another note, I’ve found its a good idea to keep your initial commitments small, and politely ask that you not be credited at first. If it turns out after a bit of work that you don’t wish to be associated with the project, you can just finish up your commitments and politely say that’s all you can contribute. I’ve meet a few directors who seemed really nice at first, but after a few hours a week of working on their film, turned out not to be fun to work with. People disappearing and leaving unfinished work is a huge problem on these types of projects, so it helps to be as un-flakey as possible.

-AJ


#3

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