[Critique wanted]Ranger meets giant


#1

So this is my latest piece, I would like to hear from you guys what you feel could be improved.

Thanks!


#2

Kudos for taking on broader, bolder brush strokes. Good job! Now go do ten more just like this one!

The giant’s chest and upraised arm anatomy strike me as needing some tinkering. His head feels a tad too small as well.


#3

Thank you! I was shamelessly trying to copy the style of one of Jamie Jones paintings.

Yes, I agree. The anatomy needs some love. I dislike the giant as a whole to be honest.


#4

Yeah, I spotted the Jaime Jones look immediately. He’s one of my favorites (along with Craig Mullins and a few others).

For an action scene, the body language is a bit vague, as is the readability. What is the giant doing? Where is his left arm? What is he swinging? A club/staff? And that large round black mass–is that a shield? If so, it needs more definition so it’s not just a solid black mass. You also need to make the arm holding the shield more obvious, since the forearm is barely visible right now. Value management is very important in readability as well as the overall visual design of your composition.

The anatomy/figure has many problems (The ranger’s tiny head, giant arms and hands, lack of structural information in the anatomy in both figures, etc), and this is a symptom of trying to run and jump when you haven’t learned to crawl and walk yet. Slow down and study anatomy/figure so that you aren’t just mimicking another artist’s surface treatment by emulating his brushwork, while all the underlying structure of your image’s various elements are totally wrong. No amount of surface treatment will save a painting is all the foundation elements are problematic. It’s just like how no amount of special effects will save a really bad screenplay with bad acting and bad direction.

Artists like Jaime Jones are compelling not just because of their brushwork, but because they have very strong foundations as artists. They have mastered all the critical foundations like composition, perspective, lighting/values, color theory, anatomy/figure, etc. If they didn’t have those foundations, their brushwork would be meaningless.


#5

Yeah, I love his work as well. I’ll be sure to check out Craig Mullins as well!

Thank you for this. You are very correct. I was workings ahead of my skill level. My main goal was to try get a real composition going. I was also trying to think of the values and anatomy when doing this piece. But I was to focused on rendering it nicely that I drifted away and started neglecting the main ingredients. An easy misstake a lot of beginners do I figure…

I was trying to do something grand with lacking fundamentals. I should do more studies and less renders.


#6

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