Best Quicktime compressor?


#1

Hi,

I just want to know what is the best Quicktime (Video and Audio)compressor. I use Mpeg4, but I find myself with a 40 mo file for only 3 min of video at 30 fps.

What kind of compression is used in movie trailers?


#2

From my experience MPEG4 is just about the best one that QuickTime has to offer. Play with the settings some more; the lower the bitrate/resolution/framerate the smaller the file will be.


#3

as far as i know they use sorenson for compressing all the videos on the Apple site.


#4

Originally posted by DaForce
as far as i know they use sorenson for compressing all the videos on the Apple site.

Sorenson or Sorenson 3? And what’s the difference?


#5

to be honest i dont know the difference. sorry :slight_smile:


#6

Sorenson 3 alway seems quite good to me…


#7

MPEG-4 seems to be the future but there needs to be some actual standards for using this “standard” because an MP4 file isn’t an MP4 file isn’t an MP4 file. Everyone has their own flavor, unlike the ubiquitous portability of Layer-3.

If you’re only concerned with Windows/Mac people seeing the video Sorensen-3 seems to be your best bet but settings can be very tricky and if you don’t spend the money on their professional compression suite you have access to only a few of its controls. Generating video as nice as you see on the Apple QT Trailers page, but at the same final bitrate, will be difficult to impossible, unfortunately. As good, yes. As good but as small, that’s hard, because they want your $$$.

It was suggested to me a two step approach, which I just discovered works pretty well. I first start with an uncompressed version of the video at my target resolution (ie 320x240). From here I make a Motion-JPEG A version of the file with the quality slider set to High. For a six minute video this went from ~1.5Gb down to less than 200Mb. From this MJPEG file I exported a Sorensen-3 version with the quality slider set to Medium, keyframe every 24 frames. The result still looked very good, no bad tiling or drits hanging out after transitions and the resulting file was about 26Mb. Going straight from the uncompressed to Sorensen-3 with the same exact settings got me a 40+Mb file that doesn’t look 50% better than the 2-step file.

Give it a shot.


#8

Originally posted by pockets
MPEG-4 seems to be the future but there needs to be some actual standards for using this “standard” because an MP4 file isn’t an MP4 file isn’t an MP4 file. Everyone has their own flavor, unlike the ubiquitous portability of Layer-3.

There are only 2 types of mp4(simple profile and advanced profile, qt only supports simple), everything else (divx, xvid, etc…) are just based on mp4 technology. Though divx can encode .mp4 files(simple and advanced), it is an option in the encoder settings. All players that play mpg4 will playback atleast simple profile(divx player will play all quicktime written mp4 files) .


It was suggested to me a two step approach, which I just discovered works pretty well. I first start with an uncompressed version of the video at my target resolution (ie 320x240). From here I make a Motion-JPEG A version of the file with the quality slider set to High. For a six minute video this went from ~1.5Gb down to less than 200Mb. From this MJPEG file I exported a Sorensen-3 version with the quality slider set to Medium, keyframe every 24 frames. The result still looked very good, no bad tiling or drits hanging out after transitions and the resulting file was about 26Mb. Going straight from the uncompressed to Sorensen-3 with the same exact settings got me a 40+Mb file that doesn’t look 50% better than the 2-step file.

The reason why going from mjpeg to sorenson3 was smaller is because you allready got rid of a bunch of quality out of the file in the first place so there is less for it to compress when you goto sorenson. Mjpeg is just like jpeg, it throws away information to keep the file size down. So your just recompressing less information. Your better off just messing with your sorenson settings from the uncompressed file and setting it to a lower quality setting. Recompressing it 2x is just the long way around of doing things. It’s like justifying buying 100 octane gas for your car because you get better gas mileage, but it costs 5x the price.

Also instead of using uncompressed for your first rendered file, use either quicktime with PNG codec or avi with HuffYUV codec, or if you are running a mac with 10.3, use quicktime with the Pixlet codec. All 3 of these are lossless codecs that compress really small compared to an uncompressed one, so the quality is exactly the same. Also that makes the compression time much faster because there is alot less data to process (uncompressing the file is much faster than dealing with a file 5-10x the size.)


#9

While you are correct I’ll point out the whole process is about throwing out information. The trick is to throw out as much as you can before the image is too degraded. The end result was not degraded looking compared to the larger example.

With the standard, free version of Sorensen you’re not getting the multi-pass (which means multi compressed) capabilities hidden in the professional compression suite version of the compressor.

Sorensen is extremely slow making experimentation very tedious and time consuming. You can’t count on settings that work great on a 10sec clip working at all on a clip that’s a couple minutes long.

But you do what you like.


#10

It depends on what you are going to do with the file. I would take a look at divx 5, unless you are going out to the web where you want maximum compatability.
If it is compatability you need, Sorensen or mpeg4 are good options.
It also depends on what kind of stuff you’ll be encoding. Some codecs are better than others in certian areas. Experimentation is the best advice I can give.
To optimize file size, I usually push the quality down to where I can’t stand the picture any more, and then set the knob one notch higher.

Just a sidenote: even though it is called Uncompressed, it is still a codec, albeit a lossless one.


#11

Originally posted by beaker
There are only 2 types of mp4(simple profile and advanced profile, qt only supports simple), everything else (divx, xvid, etc…) are just based on mp4 technology. Though divx can encode .mp4 files(simple and advanced), it is an option in the encoder settings. All players that play mpg4 will playback atleast simple profile(divx player will play all quicktime written mp4 files) .

Two types of MP4 compression perhaps with several more file types that wrap around the data, most of which are mutually exclusive. You can’t play back MP4 encoded Windows Media files with the Quicktime 6 player.

Perhaps you can play back Quicktimes in the DiVX player (another variation on MP4) but not vice versa or at least not without going full geek and jumping through all sorts of hoops. The Linux/OSX MPlayer will do many types of files as well but most people aren’t going to have it.

If you’re releasing to the web you have either Windows Media or Quicktime to choose from but you’ll have a greater level of ubiquity with the Quicktime player now that Microsoft has halted development on the Mac WMPlayer to a point that most of the more recent files I’ve attempted don’t work. DiVX (and it’s multiple flavors) is, for the most part, geek only. REAL-One, fuggetaboutit. Few regular folk are going to take the time to track down, download, install and configure some special player for your or anyone else’s little movie. They won’t do it. Not the regular folk. They’ll just move along.


#12

Two types of MP4 compression perhaps with several more file types that wrap around the data, most of which are mutually exclusive. You can’t play back MP4 encoded Windows Media files with the Quicktime 6 player.

Thats because the mp4 compression from M$ wasn’t even based on mp4, they just called the codec that because they thought that the mpeg board was going to endorse their version of it. It doesn’t even carry the mp4 file extention.

Perhaps you can play back Quicktimes in the DiVX player (another variation on MP4) but not vice versa or at least not without going full geek and jumping through all sorts of hoops.

Actually you can. The divx codec you download off divx.com makes it so you can play the codec files through the quicktime player (only on mac though). The option I explained about outputting mpeg4 files with divx, they will play in quicktime on both mac and pc as long as you don’t use any of the mp4 advanced profile options (stick with simple profile).

f you’re releasing to the web you have either Windows Media or Quicktime to choose from but you’ll have a greater level of ubiquity with the Quicktime player now that Microsoft has halted development on the Mac WMPlayer to a point that most of the more recent files I’ve attempted don’t work.

M$ updated their media player on OSX to version 9 back in November.


#13

Thanks for the tip on outputting to QuickTime PNG codec before sending it to Sorenson. I have not upgrade to OS 10.3 yet.

Does anyone know if Sorenson Squeeze will recognize a Pixlet encoded QuickTime?


#14

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