A good way to improve my drawing skills


#1

Hi guys,can you give me some advice how I can improve my drawing skills?
I’m not good at it,but I hope when I practice and practice and practice,my skills get better (because at the moment lot’s of my pics are only good enough for the waste box)
Thanks for your help!


#2

take classes? draw everything that comes to mind?

im learning to draw too (taking lessons this year to see if it helps) cuz i need to learn to draw concepts for my stuff before i go all gung-ho with 3d. so far drawing first has shown me that having a model to focus from helps, and if i cant make it look interesting in the way i want it then i just dont model it.


#3

um, practice?seriously


#4

“DRAW!!! DRAW!!! DRAW!!!”

In other words, practice drawing, practice drawing, and then practice drawing some more…

There’s a thread over at 3d buzz where I put in some tips on drawing and stuff… you may want to check it out…

http://sv1.3dbuzz.com/vbforum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=78195&perpage=10&pagenumber=2


#5

[ol]
[li]Take drawing classes, it helps alot if you have some guidance and tips when you’re drawing. Draw as much as you can it doesn’t matter what.[/li][li]Lifedrawings are a good way to practice on poses, weights and proportions. You should take a little notepad with you to you never know when you see something interesting.[/li][li]Or just sit in the park and observe people, birds, dogs, etc. Make quick sketches, it doesn’t matter if they’re not detailed.[/li][li]Study human anatomy if you draw humans, it will help alot when you know how the arm is attached to the body etc…[/li][/ol]Here’s a site where you can find alot of reference:
http://www.fineart.sk/
Check out the Andrew Loomis Anatomy Books

Some other sites about drawing:
http://www.artcluster.com/whiteboard/tips/index.html

http://home.teleport.com/~hsimante/hartext/drawtips2.html

http://delusionstudio.com/ref/

http://drawsketch.about.com/od/drawinglessonsandtips/

Happy drawing:)


#6

Do a life-drawing class. Drawing the human body is the toughest and most rewarding subject you can tackle. Apart from anything else it’ll really teach you to look at something properly, not in the superficial way we do in day-to-day life. I firmly believe that you only begin to understand a subject visually once you’ve drawn it. I’d also advise against doing self-portraits in lieu of a life-drawing class as you have a pre-defined idea of what you think you look like. Drawing a stranger is the best and most productive way to learn.

You can also do some exercises like doing 20 second drawings, drawing with your wrong hand and drawings where you don’t take your pencil off the page. These help train your dexterity and sharpen your perception.

Good luck,

Andrew


#7

because at the moment lot’s of my pics are only good enough for the waste box

Be carefull now and don’t beat yourself up. If your purpouse for drawing is to have the drawing be the final product then yes you have a more immediate need for improving your drawing skills so you can have a nice finished product.

If you are drawing because you intend to create 3d models or further develop the drawing in another fashion then the drawings don’t necessarialry have to be high quality.

Just be carefull and don’t feel bad because your drawing isn’t at the level you want to be at. Keep drawing and always remember that even a bad/loose drawing is still a way to document ideas you have in your head.

Good luck.

-jscott


#8

Here’s something I’ve been doing since I was a kid. Helps more with the creative side but it makes for some interesting dynamic drawings using everyday items as a source of inspiration.

Get a pad of paper and pen/pencil
Look at a stucco or stone wall or crumbled piece of paper and set your eye to pick up shapes into defineable forms. You learn not to leave the piece you are drawing so as not to lose sight of it. This is kinda like looking for shapes in clouds. Your hand will eventually produce what you see with enough practice. I never had patience for still lifes of bowls of fruit. This abstract method really fired up my imagination making it easier to draw expressively and making it easier to draw everyday things.

richcz3


#9

Try finding an atelier near you. An atelier is like an artist’s studio dedicated to teaching and passing on classical drawing techniques. I know there are many across the world and their admittance policies are different.

http://www.artrenewal.org/asp/database/atelier_list.asp

If you’re in California(San Diego area specifically), there’s one I recommend. The Watts Atelier. Stick with them for a few years and they will help you improve immensely. There’s no portfolio requirement to get in and the classes are only like $300 each. It’s a great little school that is really dedicated to teaching their students the methods of the masters. They believe anyone can draw with practice but it takes anywhere from 2-5 years to get good.

And of course, it doesn’t need saying but always practice. I’d say at least half an hour a day.


#10

Thank you guys for your tips and especially for the links (i tried out yahoo,but sometimes I don’t get what I’m searching for :slight_smile: )


#11

What do you think about the gnomon analog series? The foundation dvd’s would really help with perspective, I would think. They have other ones with creatures and stuff… if only they had one about figure drawing. :shrug:


#12

Hi guys,can you give me some advice how I can improve my drawing skills?

Take part in the CgTalk Daily Sketch Group - Great practice, especially since the themes are so varied.

http://cgtalk.com/forumdisplay.php?f=130


#13

Well, it’s a cliche but it hasn’t been posted so far and I still think it’s the best intro to drawing book out there, get “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain” by Betty Edwards.
Your local public or school library probably has at least one copy.

Other than that, take life drawing classes if you can, if you have an art school or college near you they may well have cheap or free weekend or evening courses.
If you can’t get drawing classes, just draw.

Feel free to mess around with different media as well, a lot of people who might struggle with, say, pencils might feel right at home with chalk , charcoals, paint, whatever.
Personally I am a lot happier using any medium that lets me doodle in a quick tonal lighty-shadowy sort of way than a typically more linear medium like pen or pencils.

The skills learned are much the same regardless of what you use to make marks with I’d say.


#14

hmm,i think i should go to the library tomorrow,lend me a book and after practicing a few days i just give it a first try at the “daily sketch”


#15

i seriously recommend this book http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/202-9645757-2744659

it is on the readers list of every good art foundation course in uk and uses the same methods taught by all good teachers. and is a bargain for £9.

edit: i didnt realise SpeccySteve posted same book.


#16

I bought this book and I recommend it to anyone. Whoever said somthing about the Gnomon analog dvds, they are awsome but they cost a looooot. The drawing and design bundle is 800+ bucks… Im saving up so i can buy a few of them. :slight_smile:


#17

Hold a pencil often,… and hold it with your mind.


#18

Did you ever go there? I go there now and its awesome! Been there for a year now, man I wish I knew about it 4 years ago when I moved to San diego


#19

Today I went into the city and bought the book by Betty Edwards,I’m dying to see my drawings after reading it,and then I’ll probably take lessons.Thanks for your tips so far.

See Ya!


#20

Do lots of life studies, anatomy, figure studies etc. hang out at www.conceptart.org , and start a daily sketchbook there, draw everyday, and practice constantly.