20+ Years Retouching....


#1

Hi Gang:

Just thought I would introduce myself. I’ve been retouching for over 20 years.
If anyone has any questions I’d be happy to answer them.

Here is my online portfolio:

http://www.retouch.ca

Please Enjoy!

Glenn


#2

Beautiful work.

How much of the alterations are completely repainted vs borrowed from other supplied or shot photo sources vs 3d generated?

On the toaster or soup ladle reflections, for example, do you mainly go in and repaint from scratch?


#3

Hi Joseph:

>> How much of the alterations are completely repainted vs borrowed from other supplied or shot photo sources vs 3d generated?<<

It really depends on the image. On the soup laddle, I only had one image to work with. I remember I had to mask shapes and then brush in shapes and color. I did the same thing for the toaster image. The toast was a separate image if memory serves me well. I lot of brushing in color. I typically take readings of surrounding color, mask the area I wish to paint and brush and build up the color with a low opacity brush. I’ll then add a small amount of noise to break-up the smoothness of the brushing.

I will also look through the individual channels of color (typically work in CMYK) , some have more information or shape to them than others, so I’ll use a Channel Mix to adjust the shape/color.

Hope that helps, Glenn


#4

Very interesting. Thanks


#5

Hi Glenn,

I’ve been retouching a few years now, but most of my background has been producing digital prints for photographers. Since going freelance, I’m finding that most ad agencies will do all of their work in CMYK mode. I often wonder if it’s just my imagination, but when working in CMYK, I’m finding that I need to adjust some of the techniques which I used to use in RGB. Obviously some filters don’t work, but there seem to be more subtle issues going on with curves and the dodge and burn tools. Is it just me?

I guess there’s a lot to cover here, but if you have an image which is originally in RGB, are there any things which you’d chose to do first in RGB before converting the file to CMYK?

Thanks,

Penny.


#6

Hi Penny:

>>I guess there’s a lot to cover here, but if you have an image which is originally in RGB, are there any things which you’d chose to do first in RGB before converting the file to CMYK?<<

The simple truth is that anything that is to printed on paper has to be converted to CMYK at some point. RGB is nice in that it has a very large color gamat and the images look terrific on screen. The biggest drawback with CMYK is the color space is far smaller than RGB. You probably know this already.

Companies use different workflows. Some keep their images in RGB and use color profiles in Photoshop for different uses always retaining the original RGB image. One color profile might be for magazines another for newspapers, billboards etc.

The only thing I would really do in RGB first is apply (as you mentioned) any filter or command that isn’t available in CMYK. I find that all my retouching, and corrections are pretty much the same. Having said that though, I actually find it easier to color correct in CMYK. I have been working in CMYK for so long that the Channel Mix, Selective color correction and the Curves function are easy for me to use because I know what the color will look like just by reading the numeric color values.

The biggest issue you will face though is converting the RGB image to the CMYK color space. You MUST check your color settings in Photoshop whenever you convert your image. This has the biggest impact on the final look of the image and you may have to try a couple of different settings. People often get disappointed when they see the CMYK image compared to the RGB one. Bright colors can often be lost to a degree, but one has to live with this as some of the colors just arn’t in the CMYK color space, but that’s the only way to get the image on to paper!

I hope that helps, Glenn


#7

Hi Glenn,

Thanks for that. It answers one little mystery, which is that I can confidently work solely in CMYK for the most part and not worry about too much cross-over from RGB. I’ve found that when working as a freelancer (which hasn’t been long) every single company I’ve worked at has a slightly different proofer (some are awful) and the monitors vary from one desk to another. In that way, I miss knowing what particular adjustments I need to make when working on a regular monitor/printer while a full-time employee.

All the best,
Penny.


#8

Impressive portfolio ! Looks like you are doing this since I was a baby that couldn’t even speak :smiley:


#9

Sorrty my english
Excellent work. :drool:
I want to know if I need good drawing skills to begin working in the degree of complexity in which you work.


#10

>>every single company I’ve worked at has a slightly different proofer (some are awful) and the monitors vary from one desk to another. In that way<<

Yes, this is very true. You will learn to color correct by reading the color values as opposed to what you see on screen very quickly. Get yourself a good CMYK tint book, it will help you to pinpoint colors accurately regardless of what the screen/proofs look like and prove to clients that you have input or corrected to the right value.

Drawing skills can be very important. A retouching program is only a tool. You could give me the best accounting program in the world and it is only as good as the numbers one puts in.

Hope that helps, Glenn


#11

Very nice work there! I really like the toaster, you made it look much more interesting.:slight_smile:

If it whas up to me i would have put you on the front page. :slight_smile:


#12

>>Very nice work there! I really like the toaster, you made it look much more interesting.:slight_smile:

If it whas up to me i would have put you on the front page.<<

It’s always hard to know what image to put on the front page. I started changing them up monthly in hopes of making it more interesting. I appreciate your feedback.

Thank you, Glenn


#13

Very nice work ! There’s some amazing pieces. Mods like the hilton made me ponder over where the ‘cheat’ limit was when enhancing images.

No offense, but I must say your website could use a little beautification itself =)


#14

Wow really great, over 20 years… That’s meaning you are retouching before I born :smiley:

In the 80th, which tools did you used to do retouching? It was a hand craft… Sorry I mean, it was without computer graphics?

On the first of 90th I was retouching images pixel by pixel, i was 6 years old… I didn’t used the DOS, but it was on Atari Star keyboard…

Could you please tell us a little bit of your work flow, from the 80th till now… really I would like to know…

Thank you very much…


#15

If anyone is interested and it is OK with the moderator a free lesson was recently posted here on how I create shadows:

http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/comretouch/chapter/index.html

Hope it helps, Glenn


#16

Hi ghoniba

I work in a photo studio as a part time and do some retouching, you know removing spots, eye bags and tucking stomachs, all simple stuff. is there a useful suggestion or you know a though of what to watch out and stuff from your experience.

cheers


#17

>>I work in a photo studio as a part time and do some retouching, you know removing spots, eye bags and tucking stomachs, all simple stuff. is there a useful suggestion or you know a though of what to watch out and stuff from your experience.<<

I think I know what you are asking so here goes.

When airbrushing or cloning, make sure you change the brush positions up often. The worst thing you can have are repeat patterns. I use a low opacity brush when working on skin (20%) and ‘massage’ the areas with the brush to gradually remove things. Add a small amount of noise if need be to break up any smoothness that you may have introduced with the brushing.

Hope that helps, Glenn


#18

no questions. just praise. Lovely images.
Its amazing to see how you fix the originals | how do you get such control with the clone tool?
respect.


#19

Very interesting, i assume all those pictures in the gallery are for clients? There are some strange request, like the goalie being removed in front of the goal (not an trivial thing). That is a pretty generic goal, wouldn’t it have been much cheaper and easier to just make a new picture of a goal?

The one with the the feet (010) is very interesting and pretty good work, as is the one with the mixer (011). I have to say some pictures look worse IMHO after being retouched, they just look too smooth and lack detail. I guess that’s how marketing (and probably customers too?) want them though.

Another question i have is how do you feel about work like 034, where you are basically doing work that could’ve been done by the person with the original image in 5 seconds.


#20

Thank you again guys.

1541:

They are all client images. You do get strange requests. Quite honestly I wonder why they do what they do sometimes. I don’t think the average consumer will notice half the stuff that is done or appreciate it. You and I eventually pay for the retouching in the cost of the product, Good question.

Re-shooting an image can be far more expensive than retouching. Sometimes the person or products are unavailable and some of the shots are supplied by the client that are images from another country, who knows. The clients seems happier to pay for the retouching. Believe it or not it is usually cheaper to retouch.

All of the retouching is done as per the clients requests whether I think it is better than the original or not. The customer is always right!

Image 034, If I remember correctly this image was a painting and the original text never existed, it was dropped in on the final poster. The text was picked up from the main heading and altered.

Glenn