Portfolio Suggestions for best impression?

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Old 05 May 2002   #1
Portfolio Suggestions for best impression?

Hello Game Industry Professionals. I've got another question for your expertise. I Love Modeling. It's the favorite part of the whole experience, with Texturing and Animation following as a close second, and all the other stuff following. So my question is, for someone like me, what type of job should I be trying for to attain my ideal "fit", or and possibly more important, what kind of job in the game industry is easiest to get into to get started with. Excluding the somewhat obvious "intern" response, because I believe that I'm experienced enough to skip that process, besides I already interned briefly at Sega a while back anyways. But then again, I suppose if all of you really think interning is the way to go, then I guess I should do that.

And of course based on the job that you think I should focus on, how should I structure my demo reel. Should I do a ton of models, and just show them in wireframe or something, do just a character or two and texture and animate them? Or what? And is it better to show that I can do low-poly and avoid the hi-poly stuff, or both or what. So what do you all think?


Thanks in advance.
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Last edited by windarr : 05 May 2002 at 06:06 AM.
 
Old 05 May 2002   #2
Re: Portfolio Suggestions for best impression?

Quote: Originally posted by windarr
what kind of job in the game industry is easiest to get into to get started with?


...tester...
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Old 05 May 2002   #3
Really? Darn, because from what I've heard, most tester positions are full time 40hr positions. And I can't live off of the money that would generate having to give up my waitering job for it. Unless you know of places that don't work their testers on 40hr work weeks?
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Old 05 May 2002   #4
Jeebus.

Expect at least 40hr work weeks in any facet of the games industry.
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Old 05 May 2002   #5
Ok, well suppose I try for that. I live in the Bay Area, and from my understanding the average tester position pays about $10/hour. I wouldn't be able to live on that kind of wage, so I'd have to keep my waitering position for about 2 days a week. I know that my demo reel still needs some work to get me a job, so I'm worried that two jobs would make finishing my demo reel take forever, or is a tester position such a surefire way to get into the art department that the demo reel takes backseat to to it?
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Last edited by windarr : 05 May 2002 at 04:30 PM.
 
Old 05 May 2002   #6
Can I get some input please?



Hey guys, anybody have some input on this? I'm trying to structure a plan for my demo reel, and I want your opinion on this.

Thanks.
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-Clifton Hill-
*Artist / Epic Fantasy Novelist*
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Old 05 May 2002   #7
From what ive seen, being the props modeler/texture guy is easiest. Its entry level from my understanding. So having scene objects would be a definate plus in the right direction. I asked a art director over at Red Storm once the same question your asking now and he told me to get a magazine of a room and model that room with props and all to the exact likeness of the picture. Another thing that would be good to show is LODs of a model.... Show a character with low mid and hi poly counts and make them all look the same. This shows companies that you have a deeper understanding of what games demand. Now I draw the line from animating to modeling so I'm not too sure you want to spend too much time animating unless thats something you feel strong in. Although it is good to show that your models/characters can animate and still hold together by bending/twisting and turning limbs. Anyway I hope this answers a couple of questions. Keep in mind I am not a professional, but just a lowly lowly student. But I hope my opinion serves as a comparison you can use in persute of your demo reel.
 
Old 05 May 2002   #8
Sounds like good advice. But what do the rest of you think?
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Old 05 May 2002   #9
SeanW has given some good advice, especially about the level of detail. The most important talent a 3d artist can have is recreating an object organic or inorganic as accurately as possible. Show some concept art and the models to go with it in your portfolio. Make sure you can recreate your concepts as accurately as possible. If you're looking for a job in the game industry, forget about high poly stuff. Focus on low poly. The trick is to make a low poly model look as high poly as possible. Texturing is a crucial part of this. Focus on detailing you textures with subtle lighting painted on the texture itself. Create different objects. For instance one character(Human), one alien, a vehicle, an animal, anything you can think of but make sure you have variety. Well, I hope this helps you at some level.

Cheers
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Old 05 May 2002   #10
I think everyone is about dead on. Cater your reel to what you want to do, and see yourself doing a few years from now. Do alittle soul searching and find out what makes you happy, then pound away on your reel. If you love modeling, focus on that, and so forth. Another important aspect of the reel is its look and feel. Most companies watch the reel in fast foward and only stop when they see something that catches thier eye. So when you make your reel, watch it in fast foward and see if it looks visually appealing. Another aspect that'll make getting a job easier is your total package that you send to a company. Pick a theme and stick with it. Make sure that from resume to buisness card, to the envolope you send it in, that there is no denieing its yours. A graphic design esk package makes you easily recognizable and rememberable when they look for someone to hire in the future. Oh, don't forget to smile Wish you the best of luck with your reel and job hunting.
-D
 
Old 05 May 2002   #11
Talking Thanks guys

Well not exactly what I was looking for, but then again, I needed advice, not someone trying to make me happy. I guess I'll have to scratch texturing my high poly demon general for now then. I guess I'll get cracking on the lower poly stuff.

Anyone have any other suggestions, or advice?

Thanks,
__________________
-Clifton Hill-
*Artist / Epic Fantasy Novelist*
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Old 05 May 2002   #12
I looked at your website

You need to work on you 2d painting skills, you need to be able to make good textures..you have a long ways to go in this area..You need to draw characters and creatures and other things I noticed your perportions and anatomy are a off, work on that also


Do the low poly models because unless your an extremly talented high poly modeler you wont find work at the entry level
 
Old 05 May 2002   #13
Cover all aspects of gaming in your demo...

include a low poly model - for the in game

a high poly model - for the cinematic

a set- low or high - your call

some animation - make you model do something.

have a theme....fantasy, future, whatever

show your textures - the most important if your going for modeling.

show your drawing ability.

and most of all it all has to be high quality work....so compare it all to someone you think kicks ass...if its as good or beter your good to go.

That is my best advce to you, I dont claim to know everything so if anyone disagrees with me so be it, just dont waste my time by telling me so. Goodluck.
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Old 05 May 2002   #14
Magic pen: Thanks for taking the time to check out my site, I appreciate it. Yeah there is always so much to work on, and so much to improve upon. But I will definitely work on buiding low poly stuff, I'll find time to work on my drawing and painting skills. Thanks for your help.

Rob3d31: All great advice. Thanks a bunch for your input. Except what do you mean by "a set- low or high - your call"?

Anybody else got anything to add? Oh, how about quantity, I know about the 2-3 minute suggested limit on a demo reel, but how about the content, should I aim for a lot of models to show, or if I have a few really good ones, should that be sufficient, like maybe 4-5? Or what do you think?

Thanks,
__________________
-Clifton Hill-
*Artist / Epic Fantasy Novelist*
Blog | Twitter | Linked In | Facebook | Goodreads
 
Old 05 May 2002   #15
doin this quick. haven't read all the replies so forgive if I'm repeating.

You've got a rilly good start. Your torso skills seem to be down. I'd work on reweighting the purple alien a bit (esp: hips, thigh area - for a real challenge, pose him doing behind the neck pull ups - there is a soluctin to that believe it or not).

also your facial topology doesn't relfect true muscle and bone structure, i.e. the facial shroud isn't acurate.

So I'd forget about torso's for awhile, work on faces and setup.

oh, yeah. and forget about poly count. Don't worry about it.

L8
 
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