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Old 11 November 2007   #1
Women in VFX! :: Special Feature

Hey there,

I thought I might delve into an issue that isn't normally talked about. Here we go, Women in VFX. Not Grendel's Mum, but the workers. We talk to a number of Producers and VFX Supervisors about their careers, stepping up into the world of VFX.

Please click the glass ceiling and free free to comment.


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Last edited by PaulHellard : 11 November 2007 at 08:57 AM.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #2
is it time already for the obligatory 'women in cg' article? I'd rather someone did a 'disabled' person in cg article or something like that. But since, I'm not capable of creating it myself, I guess i'll just shutup and read the article.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #3
"Sometimes a young woman is the only person in class, and feels completely isolated, or even worse, feels unwelcome."

What is this with making women victims all the time? The only person in class?? How many time would that happen?

"They are often the ones sacrificing lunch, breaks, and evenings."

Not im my experience. Women with little children are the first to go home every time. If people have to work late it's always the people without or with grown up chidren who'll do the time.
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Old 11 November 2007   #4
What a terrible article. More like Angry Feminists in VFX.

Last edited by CIM : 11 November 2007 at 02:49 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #5
Sorry but I have to agree with some of the other comments about this "topic".
Shaking my head at Charlene Eberle, VFX Supervisor's need to display her tude with the middle finger salute. Just makes the article even sillier and sophmoric.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #6


This goes a long way to help the industry

pointless.
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Old 11 November 2007   #7
The article is interesting, and thank you for providing it Paul, but I would have liked to have heard more about individual bios and what made those particular women successful. I thought a lot of the generalizations were sort of unnecessarily broad and saying that women are sacrificing more lunch breaks etc. than men isn't really true in the workplace. Btw I'm female and I suck sometimes at multitasking. I don't know, the tone of the article was a bit odd, it seemed a little rushed and too broad in scope - I think a lot of what makes these women successful are attributes that don't have very much to do with gender. Successful people are going to share traits that others of the same or opposite gender might not possess. Ultimately I think it comes down to who the person is and not their gender, but of course it's not to say that gender / race / sexual orientation / etc. discrimination does not exist, or shouldn't be talked about.

I think it would be great to do in depth interviews with some of the women featured, and not necessarily completely from the angle of their being women.
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Last edited by Rebeccak : 11 November 2007 at 02:53 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #8
chicks... man.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #9
Originally Posted by eek:
This goes a long way to help the industry

pointless.



no different than if a guy does it and it does nothing to harm or help the industry. It's one person acting out. pointless indeed.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #10
Originally Posted by eek:
This goes a long way to help the industry

pointless.


Agreed. I despise people who do that for a photo.
I'd like to say congrats for getting into the field. But she's just being a pretentious fool!
 
Old 11 November 2007   #11
Nice try

What a load of BS, every woman I have worked with gets pampered and treated far better than the others around her. I think this article was a load, and apparently I am not alone in this.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #12
Originally Posted by eek:

This goes a long way to help the industry

pointless.


I can't believe this was a serious article... There are countless reasons why women don't flock to this industry which are very easy to identify such as stupid work hours, inconsistent benefits and pay due to down time between projects, horror stories everywhere you look in the news and etc. Also crunch time for games and movies is extremely stressful, only people with a passion for it will willingly jump on for that ride. Also because the field is so male dominated it might turn many women off who would be perfectly capable of being above average in the industry.

I hate the broad generalizations...yes, women and men are different, that's why they're called women and not men.
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Old 11 November 2007   #13
Originally Posted by Rebeccak: The article is interesting, and thank you for providing it Paul, but I would have liked to have heard more about individual bios and what made those particular women successful. I thought a lot of the generalizations were sort of unnecessarily broad and saying that women are sacrificing more lunch breaks etc. than men isn't really true in the workplace. Btw I'm female and I suck sometimes at multitasking. I don't know, the tone of the article was a bit odd, it seemed a little rushed and too broad in scope - I think a lot of what makes these women successful are attributes that don't have very much to do with gender. Successful people are going to share traits that others of the same or opposite gender might not possess. Ultimately I think it comes down to who the person is and not their gender, but of course it's not to say that gender / race / sexual orientation / etc. discrimination does not exist, or shouldn't be talked about.

I think it would be great to do in depth interviews with some of the women featured, and not necessarily completely from the angle of their being women.

I agree with everything you said Rebecca. It's interesting to notice how everybody likes to be treated equal but the same people keep setting him/herself apart by using the gender thing. I always say that it's about the person, not the gender or race. Some people will be great doctors, men or women, of any race. Same for athletes, artists or whoever you imagine. It's about being able or "having talent" to do it or not. Dedicating to something or not. It's a human thing.

I personally don't like those articles because if everybody wants to be treated equal, people have to stop self-discriminating from the rest. Not that discrimination does not exist, like Rebecca said, but come on, it's 2007 and looking around I see woman and men working in the same fields all the time. I had plenty of women bosses already. I think the best way to be treated equal is to treat everybody equal, starting from him/herself.
If the interview was based on work experience and the path they came along till the place where they are today, it would be so much more interesting to read.

My 2 cents.
-Kris
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Old 11 November 2007   #14
Originally Posted by eek:

This goes a long way to help the industry

pointless.


I think his name is Gavin... Hes been living as a man for a number of years.
 
Old 11 November 2007   #15
Ugh. The second I read "women are multitaskers by nature" I cringed and lost interest. That's like saying "men are good at math and women are good at writing." In otherwords, total BS. And totally useless. Some women are great scientists and some men are great writers. Some women actually like video games! And some men like ballet. Generalizing doesn't do us any good.
I also found it amusing that the article seemed to imply that only men make unrealistic 3D Females. I've seen women doing that too.
I was the only female in many of my 3D classes in school and now I work with mostly men, but to me this is totally irrelevant. If you are good at what you do, that's all that matters.
The only times I feel like it is unusual that I'm a female doing 3D is on forums, actually. A lot of people assume that you're a man unless your name clearly labels you as female. It's more amusing than offensive though when someone says "Dude, man, nice job buddy!"
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