modeling something...

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Old 09 September 2006   #1
modeling something...

Hi guys, i jsut wonder about something. Hmm, i'm new to modeling. I saw some video training on modeling and i follow the tut and i can manage to finish the model. I learned the technique. But when i want to model other things, i can't model it. Why is this happen? Am i need for training or i don't know the concept of modeling? I'm going to vfs this October. I just wonder why is this happen..anyone had the same problem with me before?
 
Old 09 September 2006   #2
So, you know how to use a pencil... but does that make you a great draftsman? If all you've learned so far is the software side of things, then you've only learned one component - now you've got to train your eye, learn about forms, learn how to sculpt, learn how to draw. If you want to be a modeling artist as a profession, you should embrace the notion that you know how to use your tool and now it's 'just' about learning how to apply your artistic knowledge to it - Keep training, you'll get better. And don't just keep pushing vertices around, but try to learn how to really evaluate forms. Try to analyze things. If you do that, you'll see an improvement in your work in no time.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #3
For the same reason you can't animate a bouncing ball and call yourself an animator. There are many different techniques for modelling objects because objects differ wildly in nature and end use.

I don't know of any application that has a modelling tutorial, they all have many tutes dealing with different basic objects to get you quickly up to speed with different approaches. Modelling is about problem solving and strategy as well as artistic skill in sculpting. Do some of the hundreds of tutorials available for every package and you will never ask this question again.

Nothing is instant. The more you model the greater the chance that the light will ingnite in your head and you will have your eureka moment.

Chris
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Old 09 September 2006   #4
I agree with these guys. Modeling tutorials might teach you the tools but if you really wanna model...learn how to draw...learn form and anatomy...espescially if you want to model characters.
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Old 09 September 2006   #5
you get the pen means not you can do anythink !

first of all you need to know how to use it and seconds you need to love it and on the last you need to exercise patient .

if you have all this 3 option at your skills i believe you will be go to a good modeller or animater.
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Old 09 September 2006   #6
For modeling an object without a tutorial, try sketching that object out on paper first. Do it even if it's right in front of you. It forces you to think about how the object is actually made. Try to find the primary 3d shapes that make up the object and how they could be put together to make the form. Try to sketch out the process of making the object step by step visually.

This way when you open up the program of you choice, you aren't flying blind. It's helpful because it helps you hold your concentration and stay motivated when your model isn't looking right yet.

Basically it's like creating your own set of instructions/tutorial for your model. It should also help you associate what tools you need to use to create it.

Also try looking at random objects around you and taking a minute to think about how you would model them.
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Old 09 September 2006   #7
thanks for the advices guys. I'll try out the method that you all said. Thanks.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #8
Originally Posted by diginime: Hi guys, i jsut wonder about something. Hmm, i'm new to modeling. I saw some video training on modeling and i follow the tut and i can manage to finish the model. I learned the technique. But when i want to model other things, i can't model it. Why is this happen? Am i need for training or i don't know the concept of modeling? I'm going to vfs this October. I just wonder why is this happen..anyone had the same problem with me before?


This demonstrates the very reason why I personally have always been so anti step-by-step tutorials. They simply don't teach you anything in the long run, because all they do is demonstrate a single way of approaching a single, specific situation. This doesn't really help the artist, in the end, because it's not actually teaching fundamental concepts and techniques that apply to the broader spectrum.

diginime, I am sure you'll be learning properly at VFS, so I don't think you need to worry about this. But in future, I'd say that your time would be better spent reading books about techniques and theory instead of following step-by-step tutorials.

Think of it like recipes. Recipes show you how to cook a single meal, but they don't teach you how to cook. If you want to learn how to cook, you should study foods, what kinds of foods go together, different cooking methods, etc.
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Old 09 September 2006   #9
Damn, now I'm hungry.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #10
Originally Posted by leigh: This demonstrates the very reason why I personally have always been so anti step-by-step tutorials. They simply don't teach you anything in the long run,....


I beg to differ. Like so many it seems the original poster has done ONE tutorial and has not learned to model. There are many step tutorials that deal with how to handle seperate dishes. It would be like learning howto cook spagetti and then expecting to be a chef! Tutorials teach you principals and introduce you to different modelling tools. I often go back to a tute when I have forgotten a step or setting. I am interested and need the appraoch/ strategy. It's not about modelling a flower per se.

Heres hoping the poster progresses quickly to rost beef!

@scrimski
I hear ya, me hungry all the time

Chris
__________________
The terminal velocity of individual particles is directly related to pink rabbits on a bank holiday.
Characters, Games, Toys
 
Old 09 September 2006   #11
Originally Posted by leigh: This demonstrates the very reason why I personally have always been so anti step-by-step tutorials. They simply don't teach you anything in the long run, because all they do is demonstrate a single way of approaching a single, specific situation. This doesn't really help the artist, in the end, because it's not actually teaching fundamental concepts and techniques that apply to the broader spectrum.

diginime, I am sure you'll be learning properly at VFS, so I don't think you need to worry about this. But in future, I'd say that your time would be better spent reading books about techniques and theory instead of following step-by-step tutorials.

Think of it like recipes. Recipes show you how to cook a single meal, but they don't teach you how to cook. If you want to learn how to cook, you should study foods, what kinds of foods go together, different cooking methods, etc.


Thanks leigh, you gave me confident. I try my nest in VFS. I also think that VFS would help me out. I'm interested in 3D modeling and i know the tools, is just that i can't model well. That's my major problem.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #12
Originally Posted by Kanga: I beg to differ. Like so many it seems the original poster has done ONE tutorial and has not learned to model. There are many step tutorials that deal with how to handle seperate dishes. It would be like learning howto cook spagetti and then expecting to be a chef! Tutorials teach you principals and introduce you to different modelling tools. I often go back to a tute when I have forgotten a step or setting. I am interested and need the appraoch/ strategy. It's not about modelling a flower per se.

Heres hoping the poster progresses quickly to rost beef!

@scrimski
I hear ya, me hungry all the time

Chris


I agree. Step by step tutorials have helped me greatly. And it is a lot like cooking. Once you look at enough recipes, you start to learn what ingredients go well together, and methods of cooking certain foods, pretty soon you can find random ingredients and make something good out of it. Take techniques and lessons away from step by step tutorials, and learn through that. But learning theory is also very important.
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Old 09 September 2006   #13
"I'm interested in 3D modeling and i know the tools, is just that i can't model well. That's my major problem."

*is your problem modelling technique or anatomy/knowledge of real life objects? What were you modelling and what are you trying to model now?


Step by step is good as long as they also give you overview info--like with human anatomy explaining little tips about eye placement, head heights, etc. that you can remember.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #14
Originally Posted by kelgy: "I'm interested in 3D modeling and i know the tools, is just that i can't model well. That's my major problem."

*is your problem modelling technique or anatomy/knowledge of real life objects? What were you modelling and what are you trying to model now?


Step by step is good as long as they also give you overview info--like with human anatomy explaining little tips about eye placement, head heights, etc. that you can remember.


I'm trying to model a camera and i can't get the edges. My camera reference is Canon IXUS 750. The edges of the camera is kinda round. and some edges is different. This is the picture:

Original :


The edges that i can't manage to make:




Thanks.
 
Old 09 September 2006   #15
Diginime: Learn how the Subdivision Surface Algorithm works. Here's a link:

http://maxrovat.sns.hu/subdiv/

That'll be helpful. Now, there are quite some tutorials for hard surface modeling online - it doesn't really matter what app they're using, the only differences you'll see will be tool-wise. SubDs are SubDs in every program, so you won't really have the trouble of understanding what's being done if you watch someone modeling in Max while you're using XSI.
 
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