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Old 10-03-2005, 06:47 PM   #1
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Story , Script and Screenplay?

hi all,

I am making a short film.
I have studied all fundamentals regarding animation, but film making is more than animation.

I have confusion about these precesses of film making : story , script and screenplay.

I mean what do people do during these phases.

Story means the whole idea converted into written form.
do we have to write like a novel?

and what is script?
I have seen one script , which contained the story flow, camera instructions, set description.

and then what is a screenplay?
its a live action film word, but never heard in animation film. is it something like we do in storyboarding?


can anyone explain me exact meaning and workflow of these terms.
if possible please post some examples or links to someone's work on film.

thank you very much.
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Old 10-03-2005, 07:28 PM   #2
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To start with, script and screenplay are essentially the same thing. They are pretty much used interchangeably.

As far as the difference between those things and the story, that's a little tougher. You may have noticed that some movies will have a credit for "Story by Some Guy" and another credit for "Screenplay by Some Other Guy." Basically, a person gets a story credit if they created a majority of the characters, settings, events, and narrative of a movie, but the final screenplay wasn't their work. In most cases, the writer who got the Screenplay credit was hired on to rewrite the original writer's work and didn't change it enough to get 100% of the credit himself.

In animation, it seems that different teams often get Story and Screenplay credit. Typically, a whole crew of development writers will work on the story - that is the characters, the settings, and the narrative. Once they have the basic framework of the story down, someone else will take care of writing the actual production script. That person, or those people, will get a screenplay credit.

Basically, in regular feature films, having two different credits for Story by and Screenplay by usually is a sign that the original writer didn't work out. In animation, a sign of the collaborative way projects are produced.

As far as examples of each, it's easy to find script examples. Some, like the one you mentioned, are shooting scripts and include camera angles, etc. Others are reading scripts that are usually used to sell the script. There really isn't a concrete example of a "story," since that's up to however the writer or writers feel like working. It would probably look something like a short story, but there's no reason it has to.

Just my 2.
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Old 10-05-2005, 07:11 PM   #3
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nice reply

hey,

thanks for such a nice reply,

now I understand what the hack is screenplay.

I think drawing storyboards are much more important in animation than writing screenplay.

but I still want to have a look on screenplay of a live action movie.



anyone can help ???
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Old 10-06-2005, 05:18 AM   #4
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You can download free film scripts here...
http://www.script-o-rama.com/snazzy...ranscripts.html

This is a good reference to learn how to develop a proper workflow..
http://www.wildbrain.com/about_us/h...production.html

Read this to help you develop your story..

http://www.darkcloudpress.com/%5Cbl...Cegri_notes.pdf

Hope some of that helps you
 
Old 10-06-2005, 03:09 PM   #5
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I think the Storyboard vs. Script question has been debated elsewhere on the boards (I have a vague memory of seeing a thread, but I don't remember where).

I think it's a question of who you're going to be talking to. If you're just dealing with animators in a closed environment, then I'd think you can easily get away without having a script. However, there are a lot of people in the industry who can only "get it" when they read a script. If you have to deal with them, you might have to actually sit down and write the script.

I imagine the circumstances will tell you what you need and when.
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Old 10-09-2005, 02:14 AM   #6
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Storyboards are not more important than Screenplays. You cannot create a storyboard without a screenplay. They are equally important, and dependent on each other. The screenplay should be written in a way that directs a storyboard artist (even if you're both the writer and artist) on what shots should be done.

The folks at Pixar write screenplays first, then develop storyboards and animatics based off of the screenplay. This proves that animation should not be thought of as distinct from Film in this respect. It's the same process.
 
Old 10-09-2005, 03:00 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricMLevy
Storyboards are not more important than Screenplays. You cannot create a storyboard without a screenplay. They are equally important, and dependent on each other. The screenplay should be written in a way that directs a storyboard artist (even if you're both the writer and artist) on what shots should be done.

The folks at Pixar write screenplays first, then develop storyboards and animatics based off of the screenplay. This proves that animation should not be thought of as distinct from Film in this respect. It's the same process.


True that.
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Old 10-28-2005, 09:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricMLevy
Storyboards are not more important than Screenplays. You cannot create a storyboard without a screenplay. They are equally important, and dependent on each other. The screenplay should be written in a way that directs a storyboard artist (even if you're both the writer and artist) on what shots should be done.

The folks at Pixar write screenplays first, then develop storyboards and animatics based off of the screenplay. This proves that animation should not be thought of as distinct from Film in this respect. It's the same process.


once the screenplay has been finished and the storyboard aswell, where do you start working out the shots, the actual edit, camera angles etc, on a shot to shot basis, would that be alread in the screenplay (and therefore also in the storyboard?)
Do you render scenes from various camera angles, just like when filming real stuff, so you have enough footage to really EDIT material in the end?
My feeling ist that most animations dont really have an editing phase as such, the edit is almost worked out before the cg/rendering starts. Or am I mistaken?
 
Old 10-28-2005, 01:48 PM   #9
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That's always been my impression, too. I think the storyboarding phase incorporates a lot of what we'd think of as the editing process, though with things like test screenings and such, there's probably more post-production editing being done than used to be.
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Old 10-31-2005, 02:35 AM   #10
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What ive done/am doing is:

Written the story and key plot structures, i.e the key plot points. Ill do a really basic storyboard, then an advanced one with breakdowns, then animatic, color boards etc.

The key things ive found are that storyboards are essential important cuts of the film, but what i didnt relise was that the story/screenplay and storyboards are intertwinded i.e once you start boarding more idea start to bounce around, that can help the story and also resolve problems with the screenplay.

A tip my tutor said was dont try and storyboard every shot in order - whenever an idea comes into you head about any part of the film get it down! then you can always it later. So the storyboard and screenplay are essential the same thing.

And most importantly the storyboards/animatic are cheap version of the film - get these as solid as possible before doing anything else.

eek
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Old 10-31-2005, 02:36 AM   #11
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