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Old 07-26-2005, 01:02 AM   #1
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is zbrush fair?

I'm an aspiring 3d modeler and I don't yet know zbrush but I hope to soon...But I was wondering if it would be cool to put zbush models on a demo reel...It seems like you could do some really impressive models but if you showed your topology it would be a way low poly mesh....and wouldn't really be indicative of the way you model.I apologize if there's already a thread on this.
 
Old 07-26-2005, 01:46 AM   #2
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If you're making your zbrush result into a normal map then if you're rendering the normal map applied to the low poly model, showing the wire of the low poly model, and noting your normal map dimensions, then that's more than fair.

If you're creating something in zbrush and rendering out the high poly object in zbrush, then showing your low poly wire and saying that it's the same object, then that's not fair, it's lying.

Just to be clear, as you may be misunderstanding: when you sculpt a model in zbush you are still dealing with geometry, so all those little bumps that you're adding are still made of of lot and lots of polygons. As such, if you were to render out the actual wireframe from a highly detailed zbrush model, it wouldn't be low poly at all but very very high poly. You may be getting confused here because zbrush is used so often for generating normal and displacement maps, which are applied to low polygon versions of objects. It's in those examples where you'll see seemingly high poly objects with low poly wire renders, yet the actual zbrush model from which the displacement or normal maps were derived, will still be high poly.
 
Old 07-27-2005, 12:08 AM   #3
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I may not be the best person the reply to your thread, but I think that showing zbrush models is a good way to show off to your employer that you are more of an artist than a so called "button pusher". By that I am emphasizing the artistic approach that zbrush has with modeling characters. If you can sculpt it, that means that you can "Zbrush it"...and if you can "zbrush it", that means that you are more likely to be able to sculpt it. That is not necessarlily true when talking about software like Max or Maya.



Hope that helps
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Old 07-27-2005, 01:41 AM   #4
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What does it matter whether you are an "artist" or a "button pusher" if you can produce the same results either way?
 
Old 07-27-2005, 06:18 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headless
What does it matter whether you are an "artist" or a "button pusher" if you can produce the same results either way?


Hear hear.

I'd be more concerned frankly with making sure to also include some NON displaced work if you do decide to include Z-brushed meshes. If you're pondering is it "fair" or not, then you probably get what I'm meaning about the other stuff. Z-brush meshes look awesome, but they also look very Z-brushed, and don't indicate much about modeling in their surface mappings etc, I always wonder how much actual modeling is in there. Not that I'd like to jump into that entire can of worms, but, well, you didn't specify it was something other than a MODELING reel

At least imo...

Best of luck with the reel whatever you decide about the contents heheh ^_^
 
Old 07-27-2005, 10:17 AM   #6
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Z-Brush is fair...sure. It's an extra skill. Now...Poser...
 
Old 07-27-2005, 09:07 PM   #7
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Zbrush doesn't make poor modelers better. So in that respect I think it's plenty "fair". I've seen some highly detailed, poorly executed models done by quite a few people. Just because you can push millions of creases and bumps on a model won't make it better if your foundation, i.e. the weight and volume of the model isn't there.

However, I think it's very important to show that you can do traditional edgecrafting too. Because most models are going to need to be animated, or posed at one time or another. Plus knowing good edgecraft skills will allow you to optimize your scenes much better than just using Zbrush exclusively.

Personally I love Zbrush, and would never dream of modeling like I use too. But I'm glad I learned the "old" way of modeling (edgecraft modeling), as that is still important to making a final mesh.
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Old 07-27-2005, 11:15 PM   #8
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Face it Chad, we're nothing without Zbrush
 
Old 07-28-2005, 02:58 AM   #9
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Ah... dangit! Why'd you go and admit the truth! Now everyone will know!
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Old 07-28-2005, 03:23 AM   #10
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Completly off topic

Hey Chad love your new avatar.
Post it in the WIP so i can have a look at it.
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Old 07-28-2005, 04:01 AM   #11
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Also, one thing to note. The way I did my demo reel was take the low-poly mesh, and add displacement maps to them, and rendered them that way in my reel. The only issue you're going to have with this is trying to figure out how to "add" other things like clothes, eyes, etc... to your model that you are going to displace.

So for my reel I ended up having a lot of geometry floating above the model, jutting through the model, etc... I didn't have an option to render out normal maps at the time, so I had to do it the way I did.

So far I haven't heard any negative feedback from potential employers about the way I did my reel. So if it's any consolation I thought this might give you a good starting point.

However, if I had it to do all over again, I would have made my base cages more true to the silhoette of the hi-res mesh. That would have prevented a lot of the guess work in trying to get eyes, clothes, etc... to line up.

Quote:
Hey Chad love your new avatar.
Post it in the WIP so i can have a look at it.


I did it for an art test, and it will be up on my site soon. Hopefully in a day or so.
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Old 07-28-2005, 04:34 AM   #12
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i'm kinda new to the zbrush/maya/animation thing as a whole so please bear with me.

are the high polygon meshes created in zbrush too much to handle in maya when it comes time to animate?

and, if you're feeling generous...

i've sculpted in zbrush and imported back to maya with no displacement map or any extra step (although the poly count was through the roof) and had no problems. am i missing something?

merci.
 
Old 07-28-2005, 01:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stbrother
are the high polygon meshes created in zbrush too much to handle in maya when it comes time to animate?


I would assume so. You may be able to get a 2-3 million polygon mesh into Maya, but you're not going to have a lot of response when it comes to rigging, painting weights, animating, etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 1stbrother
i've sculpted in zbrush and imported back to maya with no displacement map or any extra step (although the poly count was through the roof) and had no problems. am i missing something?


Yup, I think you're missing something. Maya can handle some pretty high polygon counts, but it will kill your render times. Using displacement maps not only helps with animation, it also helps with rendering, and RAM usage.
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Old 07-28-2005, 03:59 PM   #14
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thank you.
 
Old 07-29-2005, 12:31 AM   #15
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even button pushing requires skill like art, and both are learnt and practiced.
 
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