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Old 07-17-2005, 03:43 PM   #1
Leonardo Vega
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What is the standard size?

What's a good size (pixel @ dpi) to work in? I really want to make a peice for the expose book. They ask for atleast 3700 x 2700 @ 300 dpi. Should I go bigger or stay around their?

I'm very new to the digital painting world, so all this talk about size and dpi aren't too familiar to me. I know dpi stands for dots per inch, the higher the better.

But I just wanted to know what standard size the veterans use.


Thanks,
- Leo
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Old 07-17-2005, 03:56 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegabros
What's a good size (pixel @ dpi) to work in? I really want to make a peice for the expose book. They ask for atleast 3700 x 2700 @ 300 dpi. Should I go bigger or stay around their?

I'm very new to the digital painting world, so all this talk about size and dpi aren't too familiar to me. I know dpi stands for dots per inch, the higher the better.

But I just wanted to know what standard size the veterans use.


Thanks,
- Leo


A4 = 2480x3508
A3 = 3508x4961

Hope this will help you.
 
Old 07-17-2005, 03:59 PM   #3
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There's not universal size. All depends on the work you wish to carry out, but also its finality. I mean if your pict will be on internet, or will be print on a book, T-Shirt.... After you know that, you can work on a high resolution image to add more details, etc and resized it at the end. then you'll have a better render.

The resolution given for the expose book is a minimum I think, for the quality of print.

cya ~~ le coYote
 
Old 07-17-2005, 04:04 PM   #4
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It's just that sometimes you just create to create, like I did with my pirate. But then when I went to submit my work for the expose I noticed my work was too small (1200x800)... so I felt kinda bad. So I'd like to make work that I can use for future purposes.

But I guess I should just go as big as possible... 35,000x27,000 lol

- Leo
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Old 07-17-2005, 04:22 PM   #5
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if you decide to create a picture as big as possible (35 000 x 27 000 for example ) make sur that your pc can support it ^^ cause that would be a pity that you spend 3 hours to open your psd...

moreover, the picts will be very very big (Mo).
 
Old 07-17-2005, 09:35 PM   #6
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Bigger the better! But only as big as it is livable to draw with.


With freehand drawing, the huger the pic is, the more corners or flat spots you get when attempting larger/fast curves with a brush. I work at screen res, or slightly bigger with 72dpi. When i make a piece which needs to be larger i usually double or quadruple my DPI, so it can be printed (if need be) easily.
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Old 07-18-2005, 12:26 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mzee
A4 = 2480x3508
A3 = 3508x4961

Hope this will help you.


You have to specify the DPI, your numbers are then totally useless.
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Old 07-18-2005, 04:00 PM   #8
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I think it depends on what you want do with the image. If you want to print an 16x21 image just make the new document 16x21 inches, drop down the little menu in photoshop to change px to in, and choose 300dpi because you want to print the image.

Its better to go for a larger size than recommended, it depends in your computer and if you like to make little details, you know.
 
Old 07-19-2005, 01:28 AM   #9
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I think it's all about what is comfortable for you. I started out doing pictures at 1000 pixels 150 dpi (because I knew nothing about printing), then I moved up to 2000, 3000...etc. I currently work around 5000-6000px at 300 dpi for full paintings--not because "the bigger the better", though I know my images will look better in print larger, but because it's a size I am comfortable with for the level of detail I put into my pieces. Even my speedpaints are done at 1000-2000, simply because I like the detail level there. So, my canvases have grown as I have, because of the detailing level I'm demanding of myself.

So, yeah. Do what is comfortable to you. :] No use painting if the canvas's size daunts you--or poops out your computer.
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Old 07-19-2005, 01:41 AM   #10
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I have a similar question. Should I be starting my paintings at the size of the final piece, or is there some way to increase the size as you work without getting pixilation? I really don't like starting a large image (an image too big to fit entirely on my monitor) and then zooming out to work on it, but I'm pretty retarded with Photoshop, so I can't figure out a good way to start at a low resolution and up-res as I work. (I work in Painter, by the way, just using Photoshop for sizing and cropping and sometimes fixing mistakes.)
 
Old 07-19-2005, 02:18 AM   #11
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It is possible (and helpful, I think); just don't make the starting image -too- small and expect some blurriness to occur, depending on how big to increase it to. So--definitely wait to do any detailing and stuff until after you enlarge it, just in case, so you don't lose the work. In Photoshop, go to Image > Image Size to increase or decrease size.

I actually start all my paintings at around 1500 pixels (always 300 dpi), just to get the shapes and colors blocked in because blocking in color on a 6000px canvas...no. Just, no. XD It starts lagging too much for me. I find it much easier to plan things out on a smaller scale. So I "sketch" it out smallish, fiddle with it compositionally and color-wise until I'm happy, and then blow it up to refine the sketch and start the real work. ;] Everything ends up getting overpainted in the detailing, but the "frame", if you will, was already there. But this is just the way I work--there is, of course, no real right or wrong way to go about things. :] Do what you're comfortable with.
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Old 07-19-2005, 03:06 AM   #12
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I remember from the Ryan Church DVDs he started with something like 1500 pixels @ 72dpi and then eventually up-rezed it to around 3000 or higher but always keeping it at 72dpi. Is there any correlation between dimensions and dpi? What am asking is, if my document is 3000 by 4000 pixels, does it matter if it's 72dpi or 300dpi?
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Old 07-19-2005, 09:34 AM   #13
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The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.
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Old 07-19-2005, 02:26 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tayete
The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.


we are talking about printing...
300 dpi for printing (but if you print bilboard, resoulution must be 72, if you print buissines card it can be 250 dpi...)

on web everything must be 72, it can be higher but some people have low connection and if you put on web page picture with 300 dpi it will open for a few weeks on dial-up connection...
 
Old 07-19-2005, 02:28 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tayete
The 72 dpi is a "urban legend", a myth. We take for granted what we read and we don't check the truth beneath, at least myself.

Try this: save a picture (let's say 300x300) at 72 dpi, and the same picture (300x300) at 1 dpi. Take a look at it on your screen. Upload it to some web. Do you notice anything? Yes, they are exactly the same!!!

Conclusion: dpis are something to take care for printing, but if you just want to show it on the web, use 1 dpi instead of 72, and you'll save some space, bandwith, and you'll suffer less lag while painting.


ACK!!! Is this true?? Wouldn't it be miniscule in size? That's why you have an actual pixels view in photoshop...so you can see how it will show in pixels...

....wandering away to do an experiment...
 
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