holographic recording hvd

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Old 08 August 2004   #1
holographic recording hvd

Holographic recording technology records data on discs in the form of laser interference fringes, enabling existing discs the same size as today's DVDs to store as much as one terabyte of data (200 times the capacity of a single layer DVD), with a transfer speed of one gigabyte per second (40 times the speed of DVD). This approach is rapidly gaining attention as a high-capacity, high-speed data storage technology for the age of broadband.
http://www.optware.co.jp/english/what_040823.htm

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Old 08 August 2004   #2
I like the look of that disk. Very space age and all. It'll be awhile before one of these will be under your (hd)television though.
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Old 08 August 2004   #3
hmmmm I wonder how many MP3s that will be.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #4
1 Terabyte ! Nice. Too bad that it is still in the prototype stage. That means it will be at least 5 to 10 years before it hits the consumer market.

P.S. I thought it was kind of amusing that HVD = "Holographic Versatile Disc" and not Video Disk.
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Old 08 August 2004   #5
OMG!

VEBO

Last edited by VEBO : 08 August 2004 at 05:03 PM.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #6
Does this mean I can get a copy of the Internet ?
 
Old 08 August 2004   #7
Fallout fans are prolly flipping out at the moment
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Old 08 August 2004   #8
Originally Posted by slaughters: 1 Terabyte ! Nice. Too bad that it is still in the prototype stage. That means it will be at least 5 to 10 years before it hits the consumer market.

P.S. I thought it was kind of amusing that HVD = "Holographic Versatile Disc" and not Video Disk.


Oh comeon, you know if there is a big enough rush, want, and need for it, the HVDs will come out faster. I'd say maybe 4 - 5 yrs tops before it hits consumers. 10 yrs is quite a far stretch. All this means, is now I have to buy my movies that I had on VHS, then bought on DVD all over again.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #9
I think I saw this before it was called this. I read an article about 3 years ago referring to a claim that this company (was called 3DCD I think) made a so called revolutionary prototype holographic disc that had pyramid-triangle holographs somehow imbedded within the surface of the disc instead of the linear straight surface disc, and they were somewhat successful in recording information within two sides of the pyramid hologram on the disc.
From there they were determined on refining a laser that would record on all sides of the pyramid. The cool thing that I remember about this is that the Pyramid was able to store information not only on the surface triangle of the pyramid, but also within the 3D space of each side of the hologram.
I emailed 3DCD - the company asking if there were any investment opportunities, but got no reply. It was some cool stuff.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #10
"Fasten your seatbelts Dorothy - 'cos Kansas... is going byebye!"

Woohoo... can I have one.. it's larger as my harddrive... larger as... all our harddrives, obviously.

Imagine... film quality on 1280x1024, instead of the tv-resolution... and games... large enough for... pretty much everything... and... and...

Can I have one?

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Old 08 August 2004   #11
Originally Posted by T Bomb: Oh comeon, you know if there is a big enough rush, want, and need for it, the HVDs will come out faster. I'd say maybe 4 - 5 yrs tops before it hits consumers. 10 yrs is quite a far stretch. All this means, is now I have to buy my movies that I had on VHS, then bought on DVD all over again.

HDTV has been available since the 80's in one form or another. Media technologies, particularly ones that require new formats and expensive new purchases by the consumer, manufacturer, and distributor, tend to take a while to gain popular support and widespread use.
VHS is still being phased out, and it could easily be another 5 years before HDTV is actually widespread. So while consumers would love to get their hands on these things, I don't see it happening any time soon, particularly replacing dvds. Though the computer industry might manage the turnover much quicker.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #12
Originally Posted by slaughters: P.S. I thought it was kind of amusing that HVD = "Holographic Versatile Disc" and not Video Disk.


Oh, didn't notice this earlier so I'll make a new post of it:
DVD stands for Digital Versatile Disc, not Video. Originally it was proposed that the new disc should be named as "Digital Video Disc" but when it was noticed that you could put any kind of data to the disc, not just video, it was renamed to Digital Versatile Disc just before launching the whole format.
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Old 08 August 2004   #13
I don't think it will be too long before we see this in our drive bays. CDs took a while. DVDs just came out yesterday, and the consumer burners this morning. I just bought a Sony DVD burner for $120CDN new, that a year and a half ago cost $600CDN. Once the technology is perfected, it will probably spend 1-2 years in the high-end market paying for itself, and then show up for us lowly consumers for $800 a drive and $50 a disc...

-+ Kris gets his spot in line +-
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Old 08 August 2004   #14
Originally Posted by sykosys: I don't think it will be too long before we see this in our drive bays. CDs took a while. DVDs just came out yesterday, and the consumer burners this morning. I just bought a Sony DVD burner for $120CDN new, that a year and a half ago cost $600CDN. Once the technology is perfected, it will probably spend 1-2 years in the high-end market paying for itself, and then show up for us lowly consumers for $800 a drive and $50 a disc...

-+ Kris gets his spot in line +-

I agree. Once its perfected it will be out faster then a prom date that drank too much alcohol.
 
Old 08 August 2004   #15
This is incredible. Technology sure is getting faster and bigger. But why would the consumer need that much space on a disc? I find DVD to have enough space at the moment for myself.

At the end of the day, they will still make good coasters.
 
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