CGTalk > Main > News
Login register
Thread Closed share thread « Previous Thread | Next Thread »
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 05-15-2013, 05:50 PM   #1
RobertoOrtiz
[Forum Leader]
 
RobertoOrtiz's Avatar
CGTalk Forum Leader
portfolio
Roberto Ortiz
Illustrator/ Modeler
Washington DC, USA
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 31,900
Send a message via MSN to RobertoOrtiz
Japanese Artist Creates Amazing Art Using Excel (Wait, Excel?)

Quote:
"
Microsoft Excel isn't only for spreadsheets. It can also be used to create art. Don't believe me? Just ask 73 year-old Tatsuo Horiuchi. He'll tell ya.




But why Excel? "Other specialized graphic software is expensive, and Excel came pre-installed in PCs," Horiuchi told Japanese website PC Online, adding that he found the program easy to use and more capable than actual paint."

http://kotaku.com/old-japanese-man-...-wait-499616608
__________________
LW FREE MODELS:FOR REAL Home Anatomy Thread
FXWARS
:Daily Sketch Forum:HCR Modeling
This message does not reflect the opinions of the US Government

 
Old 05-15-2013, 06:16 PM   #2
StylizedCarfan1
3D modeler
 
StylizedCarfan1's Avatar
...
USA
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 170
Impressive for excel works. I love the bird work he did.
 
Old 05-15-2013, 06:34 PM   #3
WyattHarris
Daddy x 4
 
WyattHarris's Avatar
CGSociety Member
portfolio
Wyatt Harris
WyattHarris.com
Baton Rouge, USA
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 5,739
I wasn't sure 'how' until I saw the bit at the bottom showing the drag handles. I would've never thought to use Excel in such a way. I am impressed.
__________________
HMC: Model Collection
WIP: Harris Nut House
WIP: WarCraft Troll
wyattharris.com Dig it!
 
Old 05-15-2013, 06:56 PM   #4
Octavarium
New Member
portfolio
Sandro Barbosa
Portugal
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 25
As an artist this is an issue that has bothered me many times. This kind of thing is not new; actually it is something that has always been happening throughout history. But it has grown considerably with the advent of the new technologies. The thing is, if you look at a piece like this without knowing where it comes from, there's really nothing special about it. The theme isn't new, there is nothing special about the colors or the composition, it's not even easy on the eye. So what makes it special? Why are we talking about it?

What makes it special is not the piece in itself, but the tool used to create it. I don't have a problem with that. In fact there are a few art movements with roots on similar principles, and the results are some iconic pieces of art. But that is not the case here. Here we have a piece that has underachieved because the author has chosen the wrong tool for the job. How can that be a good thing? Sure, it's pretty impressive for something made with excel, but is it amazing art? Is it even art? Is it even impressive? Had it be done in a proper software or hand painted and we wouldn't be talking about it. I mean, forget about the Excel part for a second and look at the piece. What in it is amazing?

So if someone presented this and stated that it was painted in Photoshop or similar, what would most of us say? "Piece of crap!" Then, in what way does the fact that it was made in Excel changes this piece from something like "even my 10 year old does that" to "amazing art"?

Bottom line is I think nowadays people are very quick to label anything as "art" or "design". I am not one to say what is art and what isn't (many have tried since Plato or even before that, and none could ever define it), but as someone personally and professionally enrolled in this artistic world, I think it is a very strong statement to call something "art" and it should not be taken lightly.


What are your thoughts on this?
 
Old 05-15-2013, 07:13 PM   #5
Horganovski
Freelance Animator/Rigger
 
Horganovski's Avatar
portfolio
Brian Horgan
Graphite9
Dublin, Ireland
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,858
^ Seems a little like sour grapes to me to be honest. The fact that he's been exhibiting his work for 10 years (and I assume selling at least some of it or why would he bother) suggests to me that some people do enjoy his work, even if it's not appealing to you (doesn't do a lot for me either TBH but eye of the beholder etc..). So I guess yes he gets press due to his gimmick, but people still won't buy it if it doesn't appeal to them.

None of the images I see on that webpage make me react 'that's a piece of crap' though. Maybe I don't have as high levels of artistic taste as you.. but hey probably the general populace doesn't either.

Cheers,
Brian
 
Old 05-15-2013, 07:19 PM   #6
raycerx
Hootinanny Holligan
 
raycerx's Avatar
portfolio
Dennis Allain AIA
Architect Illustrator
USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 483



It reminds me of this photo... which is fine until you realize its 7' long and was drawn in pencil. Is it a copy or is it an amazing piece of art. Great discussion here, I think one does become even more impressed by learning what the medium is... The artist name is Chris LaPorte. His Calvary, American Officers 1921 is amazing...
__________________
www.dennisallain.com
 
Old 05-15-2013, 08:47 PM   #7
nimajneb
Frequenter
 
nimajneb's Avatar
Benjamin A. Slack
Artist / Animator
nimajneb.com
Kalamazoo, USA
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octavarium
... What are your thoughts on this?




This is Picaso's bull's head, made out of a bike seat and some handlebars. I don't think anyone would argue that it was a masterpiece of technique. However, I also don't think you'd get many to argue that it wasn't art. Art, as I see it, evokes a moment of appreciation of beauty and communication of form. This is regardless of medium used, time involved in creation or intricacy of the piece. That moment, I think, is what makes it art.
__________________
---
"I am a leaf on the wind..." -Wash
 
Old 05-15-2013, 09:44 PM   #8
circusboy
Expert
Raonull Conover
Montreal, Canada
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octavarium
What are your thoughts on this?


Also google some traditional Japanese art. To spite his medium his subjects and compositions are quite 'traditional' Japanese. I studied both Chinese and Japanese art in art school-you can stop at 'it-all-looks-the-same' but you'd be dismissing some pretty ancient arts, histories and cultures.

Simple, bold strong shapes (or strokes as painted) and variations thereof are what these cultures have been doing for -well- thousands of years. It just happens to work well with vectors too.
 
Old 05-15-2013, 10:12 PM   #9
Octavarium
New Member
portfolio
Sandro Barbosa
Portugal
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 25
About the draw, I think that figures as the opposite end of the same issue. Is a piece so technical still artistic? This is a very interesting discussion.

For me it's mostly about purpose. There is this motto between Jazz musicians when playing improvisations that says "mean what you play". In my approach to art I feel this to be very important. What is the purpose of your piece? What are you trying to achieve? Then, the most important question: Did you achieved your purposes?

This is where pieces like the bull head from Picasso or the fountain from Duchamp fit in the world of art, IMO that is.

I believe this to be the difference between these two cases (the Excel work and the realistic draw). They both use a different, somewhat technically inferior tool than expected. (Like Excel instead of Photoshop or a pencil instead of a camera which is what you would use if aiming for a realistic image). But if in this last case the purpose was achieved (the draw is easily confused with a picture), on the other one the outcome is weaker than those made with the right choice of tools.
 
Old 05-15-2013, 10:57 PM   #10
leigh
blahblah
 
leigh's Avatar
CGSociety Staff
portfolio
Leigh van der Byl
A cog in the wheel
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 29,791
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octavarium
As an artist this is an issue that has bothered me many times. This kind of thing is not new; actually it is something that has always been happening throughout history. But it has grown considerably with the advent of the new technologies. The thing is, if you look at a piece like this without knowing where it comes from, there's really nothing special about it. The theme isn't new, there is nothing special about the colors or the composition, it's not even easy on the eye. So what makes it special? Why are we talking about it?

What makes it special is not the piece in itself, but the tool used to create it. I don't have a problem with that. In fact there are a few art movements with roots on similar principles, and the results are some iconic pieces of art. But that is not the case here. Here we have a piece that has underachieved because the author has chosen the wrong tool for the job. How can that be a good thing? Sure, it's pretty impressive for something made with excel, but is it amazing art? Is it even art? Is it even impressive? Had it be done in a proper software or hand painted and we wouldn't be talking about it. I mean, forget about the Excel part for a second and look at the piece. What in it is amazing?

So if someone presented this and stated that it was painted in Photoshop or similar, what would most of us say? "Piece of crap!" Then, in what way does the fact that it was made in Excel changes this piece from something like "even my 10 year old does that" to "amazing art"?

Bottom line is I think nowadays people are very quick to label anything as "art" or "design". I am not one to say what is art and what isn't (many have tried since Plato or even before that, and none could ever define it), but as someone personally and professionally enrolled in this artistic world, I think it is a very strong statement to call something "art" and it should not be taken lightly.


What are your thoughts on this?


I feel the same way as you. And people can go ahead and say we have "sour grapes" as the poster after you suggested, but I think it's silly to go out of your way to work in a medium that's not designed to do something, produce what's frankly a kinda mediocre result, and then be praised because of the fact that he did it in such a difficult way. The end result, regardless of how he did it, is still pretty meh. The work isn't bad, but it's also not particularly good either. It's like those inoffensive, insipid paintings you see in hotel rooms, which always feel more functional than expressive.

An image should be judged on the merits of how it actually looks, not how it was made.
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
Old 05-15-2013, 11:48 PM   #11
AJ1
User
 
AJ1's Avatar
CGTalk Forum Leader
portfolio
A J
Indiana, USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octavarium
What makes it special is not the piece in itself, but the tool used to create it. I don't have a problem with that. In fact there are a few art movements with roots on similar principles, and the results are some iconic pieces of art. But that is not the case here. Here we have a piece that has underachieved because the author has chosen the wrong tool for the job.

Agreed. Reminds me of those people who build cites out of toothpicks. The work pails in comparison to what a master wood carver might be able to achieve.
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_uoYQ_HwIR...tyBSept2010.jpg

Although some people manage to make really interesting forms with them that really work, just making big boxy skyscrapers from toothpicks seems like a massive waste of time. But maybe that's why were drawn to such things? I've seen a few news stories about these things, and the central theme seems to be "why would someone spend so much time on this?".

Here is a nice sculpture where the artist did a nice job with the materials given:
http://sparkjam.net/wp-content/uplo...h-the-bay-5.jpg

That guys graphic design work looks pretty good, but its nothing out of this world. The fact that it was made in excel by an old man is why it stands out for sure.

-AJ
__________________
 
Old 05-16-2013, 12:03 AM   #12
Horganovski
Freelance Animator/Rigger
 
Horganovski's Avatar
portfolio
Brian Horgan
Graphite9
Dublin, Ireland
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,858
Quote:
Originally Posted by leigh
I think it's silly to go out of your way to work in a medium that's not designed to do something, produce what's frankly a kinda mediocre result, and then be praised because of the fact that he did it in such a difficult way. The end result, regardless of how he did it, is still pretty meh. The work isn't bad, but it's also not particularly good either. It's like those inoffensive, insipid paintings you see in hotel rooms, which always feel more functional than expressive.

An image should be judged on the merits of how it actually looks, not how it was made.


I agree that it's silly to go out of your way to work in a difficult way, but the guy did say that he didn't have access to anything else, so he took what he did have access to and made something with it. And he found something in that medium that worked for him. Some people will appreciate that, like it or not, look at the music of Seasick Steve with his 3 string guitar and his foot for the 'drums' or the White Stripes where the guitarist just uses cheap 'bad sounding' guitars and a drummer that can barely play. People do like it though, there's something about the rawness that's appealing.
Others can say it's crap and they'd rather listen to Meshuggah and their 8 strings and highly technical poly rhythms. I bet the White Stripes sold more records though so clearly their lack of decent instruments or technique on their instruments didn't hold them back, in fact their decision to deliberately limit themselves helped them stand out among so many other bands that use the standard voice/guitar/bass/drums line up and use the best recording equipment they can. Jack White had a harmonica mic built into his guitar that he could yell into for it's deliberately crappy overdriven sound. Others are probably now spending a fortune on Pro Tools plugins trying to get the same terrible sound, heh.

I'm sort of playing devils advocate though as I do agree that the resulting pieces from the excel guy are pretty insipid. I showed them to a friend who is neither an artist or a CG person and his first reaction was 'those look like the kind of things that you see on the wall in a take away', and I guess I have to agree.

I guess my point is - the medium does matter. I know that to be true for me as even though I love to do CG I also love to watch stop motion films, in fact many of my favorites are stop motion. On a technical level stop motion is really crude compared to CG, but that doesn't stop it being more appealing in some ways as you can see the hand of the artist in every wobbly pose or fingerprint or shifting fur. In CG those flaws would be unacceptable of course but people still go to see stop motion and I would never accept that CG is inherently 'better'.

Cheers,
Brian

Last edited by Horganovski : 05-16-2013 at 12:08 AM.
 
Old 05-16-2013, 12:33 AM   #13
trancerobot
Art Compiler
 
trancerobot's Avatar
portfolio
Christian Storay
BIM & VDC Modeler
USA
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 605
I sense elitism in this thread. Here you are (some of you anyway), master artists who do art for a living with the best cg tools money can buy, went to the best schools, got the best jobs... and you are looking down on someone who's managed to get recognition despite not taking the path in life that you took.

Maybe there's a little jealousy involved too.

Art-wise, I think it's great. If you really get down to it, it's on par with what's shown in the galleries anyway. People do care about the medium he chose, but the fact is - if it wasn't worthy on its own no one could care.

Not every artist is a 100k earning prodigy working for a major Hollywood or AAA game studio, but that doesn't mean they are undeserving of respect.
 
Old 05-16-2013, 12:36 AM   #14
Horganovski
Freelance Animator/Rigger
 
Horganovski's Avatar
portfolio
Brian Horgan
Graphite9
Dublin, Ireland
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,858
Quote:
Originally Posted by trancerobot
I sense elitism in this thread. Here you are (some of you anyway), master artists who do art for a living with the best cg tools money can buy, went to the best schools, got the best jobs... and you are looking down on someone who's managed to get recognition despite not taking the path in life that you took.

Maybe there's a little jealousy involved too.


This. That explains better that I could where my sour grapes comment came from.
 
Old 05-16-2013, 12:39 AM   #15
leigh
blahblah
 
leigh's Avatar
CGSociety Staff
portfolio
Leigh van der Byl
A cog in the wheel
Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 29,791
But the White Stripes have great tunes
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
Thread Closed share thread


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.