lighters - no respect?

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  09 September 2012
lighters - no respect?

Was talking with a colleague the other day and he expressed the opinion that if you only did the lighting work on a scene, it wasn't worth taking credit for on your reel. I was kind of floored by this, as a lighter myself, and one who LOVES light, color, shading, texturing, rendering, and everything associated with pulling together the final image at the end. Not at all fond of animating or modeling. But it got me thinking - are lighters considered the "low men on the totem pole" in the world of VFX? If so, why? Do people think it takes no particular skill?
__________________
Del Melchionda: Portfolio
 
  09 September 2012
Your friend clearly had no idea what he was talking about lol.
 
  09 September 2012
Do not listen to your "colleague". I can attest myself as witness to the importance of proper lighting and color to scenes.

I place Color in the same group as Blocking, Framing, and Motion. Even Black and White for me is a lighting and color choice.
__________________
"Your most creative work is pre-production, once the film is in production, demands on time force you to produce rather than create."
My ArtStation
 
  09 September 2012
I would have thought lighting was one of, if not the key element of movies and photography.

That reminds me of a related question I wanted to ask. On non-CG movies I'm sure I've seen "riggers" in the credits. Does anyone know what work riggers do?
__________________
I like to learn.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by Panupat: Your friend clearly had no idea what he was talking about lol.

Ditto.

If you are a lighting artist and you light on a specific shot, you take credit for the lighting. Just as the animator would take credit for the animation and the compositor would take credit for the compositing.

Further, the actual "lighting" aspect of a particular shot or scene is often the quickest thing to do. Its often the trouble shooting, technical problems, and final 5% iterations that can eat up a lighters time. So lighters actually do more than just light.
__________________
Previously "Aryafx"

Website and Demo Reel:
http://www.sanjaychand.com

Last edited by SanjayChand : 09 September 2012 at 04:54 AM.
 
  09 September 2012
I think Lighting, as far as CG goes, is probably the least understood and appreciated by the layperson of the different elements that goes into a shot. Anyone who's opened a 3d package can hit 'Create Spotlight' and aim it at something and, technically, yes, they've just lit a scene. But a good lighter, seconded closely by a good comper, really does make or break a shot. They control how well a cg element integrates into its live background. They control where the focus is from a compositional standpoint. They control, on a subconscious level, how we feel about what we're seeing based on color and shadow. I think most of this is completely taken for granted by your average movie-goer who doesn't really understand how much goes into lighting, or any other CG element for that matter.

So from a layperson's perspective, I think, yes, lighters probably are the least respected, simply because they're the least understood. Within the CG community and anyone who's actually tried lighting a scene, I think they are much more appreciated.

Of course, at the end of the day, if its what you want to do and comes with a paycheck, who really gives a shit whether its respected, appreciated, or even understood.

As for rigging, just look up the definition. On a film set, pretty much anything built for production thats not set or props and remains off-camera or hidden could be considered Rigging. Usually its used when constructing a tool to facilitate a shot or multiple shots. A lighting rig holds lights in place. A camera rig allows you to manipulate/move the camera the way the director wants. A harness rig allows you drop your actor 50 feet off a cliff without killing them. Riggers are the people with the expertise to build and operate those things, just like riggers in CG are people with the expertise to build the rigs which facilitate the movement of models by animators in the manner in which the directors and sup's desire.
__________________
"Have you ever just stared at it.......Marveled at its bee yooty?"

Last edited by zzacmann : 09 September 2012 at 06:02 AM.
 
  09 September 2012
Reply to your friend: "derp!"

Take a look at TDKR - can you tell me when it's real and when it's CG? That's the awesome power of the lighters.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by ceruleanvii: Was talking with a colleague the other day and he expressed the opinion that if you only did the lighting work on a scene, it wasn't worth taking credit for on your reel.


Then what on earth is on his reel?

What a stupid thing to say.
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
  09 September 2012
There's indeed a problem. We need more respect from society for lighters!
Let's analyze, how respect can be built. Not to sound dumb, but it's all about clothing. I know two types of men who get respect. Those are famous rappers and priests. We could combine both traits, adding our symbols on top and get a distinct look. I think wearing a torch is also nice.
I don't know about you, but I already feel respect for this man!
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by mister3d: I don't know about you, but I already feel respect for this man!

I would totally wear that to work!
 
  09 September 2012
Lighting is huge! Your friend is mistaken. Now get to work and be the best damn lighter you can. I think we should make this some sort of Cg artist uniform. I find it quite fetching.

Last edited by azamux : 09 September 2012 at 02:19 PM.
 
  09 September 2012
I'd wear it too, mister3d. Respect!

Thanks for the responses. I seriously love what I do, I spend all my time thinking about light... and was of the opinion lighters were crucial to the final sell of any 3D. So I'm glad a lot of others agree.
__________________
Del Melchionda: Portfolio
 
  09 September 2012
A lighter/shader person in CG is, to my mind, almost like a Cinematographer/Director of Photography in Film Production. Because both build the overall look, feel, ambience of a scene.

Its like the same job being done in both, just with different tools (real camera & lights versus virtual camera & lights in CG software)

Maybe you could call yourself a "CGmatographer" or "3Dmatographer" or something?

That was a joke... But hey, maybe "CGmatographer" will stick as a CG slang-term if enough people use it.

Good luck with your lighting tasks...
 
  09 September 2012
Your colleague is sorely mistaken. Not only lighting is one of the most obviously appreciated disciplines it's also one of the three more common routes to cg or vfx supe roles. It's very far from under appreciated.
__________________
Come, Join the Cult http://www.cultofrig.com - Rigging from First Principles
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by Dillster: That reminds me of a related question I wanted to ask. On non-CG movies I'm sure I've seen "riggers" in the credits. Does anyone know what work riggers do?


They set up lights on a set, including the "rig" which is all the attacments and things that go into holding the lights in place or doing what it needs to do. My boss used to be one of these.
__________________
Personal: www.japetusproductions.com
Work:Straightface Studios

 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 12:40 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.