mockbuster $$

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  06 June 2013
mockbuster $$

http://www.pensacoladigest.com/2013...r-atlantic-rim/

I came across Atlantic Rim the other day and obviously very low budget coming out to DVD before Pacific Rim to ride on the marketing back of it's slightly higher budgeted BLOCKbuster.

I wondering how much these mockbusters make/budget?

I guess they make enough to keep making them right?

Just curious if anyone has numbers, I can't find any number online.

thanks
 
  06 June 2013
AS far as the budget is concerned most of their movies cost between 150,000-300,000 to make.

I got this from Dave the Director who works for them. It was on his myspace.

Dave is the main boss over there
Quote: DAVID MICHAEL LATT PARTNER/PRODUCTION David Latt is responsible for production and marketing. As a filmmaker, he has won over two dozen awards for his directorial and promotional work, and is a guest lecturer at festivals and industry events world-wide.


Apparently they do make enough. They have been in business since 1997. So pretty successful if you ask me.

I've read stuff from them and they don't do things like the traditional Hwood group. For example they save costs by not buying some LA studio or office space. They keep things cut and clean and just make a lot of movies, quick and fast.

They find shortcuts and use some creative thinking.
For example there was a scene in a movie where they needed a helicopter fly over and instead of getting the old Hollywood pilot which would have been thousands, they did a helicopter tour for like 400 bucks. You know those flights around the city. They got the shot they needed.

As goofy as the movies are they are getting to do what they want for a living, having fun doing it and are pretty creative at what they do.

Much props to them.
Some may say they make crappy movies, but that is okay. When I was 12 making crappy ninja/samurai movies with friends it was freaking fun and to get paid to just have fun would be great! Much props to them.
 
  06 June 2013
Their movies are atrocious and unimaginative, Transmorphers.. smh. But I guess when your movies don't cost anything it's easy to stay in business.
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by banman7: AS far as the budget is concerned most of their movies cost between 150,000-300,000 to make.

I got this from Dave the Director who works for them. It was on his myspace.

Dave is the main boss over there


Apparently they do make enough. They have been in business since 1997. So pretty successful if you ask me.

I've read stuff from them and they don't do things like the traditional Hwood group. For example they save costs by not buying some LA studio or office space. They keep things cut and clean and just make a lot of movies, quick and fast.

They find shortcuts and use some creative thinking.
For example there was a scene in a movie where they needed a helicopter fly over and instead of getting the old Hollywood pilot which would have been thousands, they did a helicopter tour for like 400 bucks. You know those flights around the city. They got the shot they needed.

As goofy as the movies are they are getting to do what they want for a living, having fun doing it and are pretty creative at what they do.

Much props to them.
Some may say they make crappy movies, but that is okay. When I was 12 making crappy ninja/samurai movies with friends it was freaking fun and to get paid to just have fun would be great! Much props to them.


thanks a lot for your post. I feel the same way. Good for them. I'm wondering if they get in trouble with legal stuff from the big wigs though?

Do they know how to change there movies just enough to get away with it or what?
 
  06 June 2013
They're too small to bother with, and don't take a cent away from the big studios core business, some even consider them parallel marketing.
They are constantly on the brink of illegality/illicit in many regards though.

Safety wise, regulations for a shoot, unauthorized shoots, non cleared people appearing in some and so on.

Their out of the box thinking way to save in some regards only works because they are small and irrelevant enough to be outside the system and go unnoticed. Props to them for doing it and having fun and staying afloat though, I find them unimaginative and a bit of a rip-off, but they hardly offend my sensitivities
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  06 June 2013
I have heard it said that SyFy pays up to $500,000 for films of this type. (I have also heard that some films are lucky to get $50,000 though) They can conceivably make their money back on that sale alone, but they also sell them internationally. They nickle and dime TV stations in every market. Imagine, sell it for $25,000 to this German station. Sell it for $15,000 to this Australian station. It can all add up to nice profit.

I also give them props for making a living doing something fun. From the standpoint of a CG artist, it can be much more fun than working on big projects. An artist on these films might do entire sequences, and every effect in it by themselves. Rather than being a texture artist or modeler, one day you might animate a monster, another day do blood spurts and another day blow up spaceships.

On the other hand, the movies don't have to be bad. There are other low budget indie movies in the same budget range, like Hunter Prey that are really good. There are also contests like the Duel Project, where directors were to shoot a low budget film in a week, and those are really good. Being cheap and fast doesn't have to mean making junk.
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  06 June 2013
The way people excuse putrid output with no creativity just b/c it's low budget, while constantly decrying Hollywood for its lack of imagination is hysterical. Something similar is seen right now with people who are defending Ouya for being a terrible video game system because "it only costs $100". If I go and rip off one of your ideas but I don't make a ton of money doing it you'd be okay with that? Yeah right.
 
  06 June 2013
[IMG]Do they know how to change there movies just enough to get away with it or what?[/IMG]

Well they are able to get away with alot of it for various reaons.

For example when Jack the Giant Slayer was released they released Jack the Giant Killer. Thing about this is that Jack is in the public domain.

In fact
[IMG]"Jack and the Beanstalk" is a British fairy tale. The tale is closely associated with the tale of "Jack the Giant Killer", and is known under a number of versions. Benjamin Tabart's moralised version of 1807[1] is the first appearance in print, but "Felix Summerly" (Henry Cole) popularised it in The Home Treasury (1842),[2] and Joseph Jacobs rewrote it in English Fairy Tales (1890).[3] Jacobs' version is most commonly reprinted today and is believed to more closely adhere to the oral versions than Tabart's because it lacks the moralising of that version.[4][/IMG]

Jack the Giant Killer was the name of the series. Anyone can make a movie about it.
I can make a movie called Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, John Carter, Beowulf, Alice in Wonderland, Moby Dick, etc. And since Hollywood is into making public Domain movies, Disney being the biggest one, then Asylum can make a movie based on public domain properties and make it come out at the same time.

Then some of the other stuff is broader in spectrum. You can't copyright Giant monsters vs robots. You can't copyright Kungfu movies in general.
That is how they skirt around that stuff legally. Sometimes thought they get a little close for comfort and I'm sure they have been sued. I know they got sued over a film called The Hobbit or something like that.
 
  06 June 2013
Raffaele's point is poignant on many counts - including why except for a few cases nobody bothers to chase them.

It sometimes costs more to chase these guys than to just let them make their nickel and dime.

Also if you win in court they probably can't pay damages anyway, because they are too small. So why bother?
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  06 June 2013
I read one of their executives also has a close connection with a major talent agency and that's how they get the name (aka hasbeen) actors for their films.

If you made a movie called the Little Mermaid you would probably get a lawsuit from Disney over trademarks.
Conan the barbarian is public domain but you probably cant stick that title on a cover and sell it (or you could try and see if you get sued).
Disney threatened a model kit company for selling a Hunchback of Notre Dame model (before the movie came out and having nothing to do with their cartoon). The company caved because they couldnt afford a lawsuit and retitled it Bellringer of Notre Dame.

And even with public domain superheroes they advise you to change them because you are open to lawsuit if you dont make it distinctively your own.


I dont hear a lot about indie movie companies other than the Asylum that make mockbusters--I am more interested in what competition they have. If there isnt much then I would question how financially viable it is. They may simply be in a special circumstance.

I have never heard of a good review of their films--usually they are labelled boring--even by those who appreciate Z grade trash.
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by teruchan: I have heard it said that SyFy pays up to $500,000 for films of this type. (I have also heard that some films are lucky to get $50,000 though) They can conceivably make their money back on that sale alone, but they also sell them internationally. They nickle and dime TV stations in every market. Imagine, sell it for $25,000 to this German station. Sell it for $15,000 to this Australian station. It can all add up to nice profit.

I also give them props for making a living doing something fun. From the standpoint of a CG artist, it can be much more fun than working on big projects. An artist on these films might do entire sequences, and every effect in it by themselves. Rather than being a texture artist or modeler, one day you might animate a monster, another day do blood spurts and another day blow up spaceships.

On the other hand, the movies don't have to be bad. There are other low budget indie movies in the same budget range, like Hunter Prey that are really good. There are also contests like the Duel Project, where directors were to shoot a low budget film in a week, and those are really good. Being cheap and fast doesn't have to mean making junk.


Hunter prey was pretty good, and not just for a 1/2 million dollar flix, it was genuinely good. How much did it make?

Thanks
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by gauranga108: Hunter prey was pretty good, and not just for a 1/2 million dollar flix, it was genuinely good. How much did it make?

Thanks


I have never been able to find any information on how much revenue the project generated in the end. I have also never heard any news of the director doing anything after that. It's the guy who made Batman: Dead End, if you remember that cool, live action short with Batman versus Joker versus Alien versus Predator.
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Learn How to Make Your Own Animated Projects!
You don't need millions of dollars or major studio backing!!
 
  06 June 2013
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