Old 2D age cartoons, observations

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Old 11 November 2012   #1
Old 2D age cartoons, observations

Being 17 years old, I grew up with modern cartoons like the Rug Rats, Ninja Turtles, Power Rangers, the Simpsons etc. Any cartoons Nickelodeon played was cool with me also, and the TV remote was my property until 6pm when the adults take over and get to watch stuff that kids hate, like the evening news.
Sometimes my Dad would put on old cartoon videos of stuff he used to watch in the stone age era of black and white TV, such as Bugs Bunny, Silvester & Tweety, Daffy Duck, Foghorn Leghorn, the Roadrunner and loads more from I guess the 1950s. Now looking back, I think those cartoons were much better than most modern stuff. They were simple, characters got hit with hammers and clubs, smoked cigarettes, fell off cliffs, got shot with blunderbusses and always survived. They had funny voices and cracked jokes I could understand at 5 years of age. The plots were uncomplicated with none of the good v evil things or deep thought plots that just do my head in with some new cartoons. They were not political or religious, or offensive to any part of society, at least not that I can see. They were just plain made for kids, to make kids laugh.

While I hate to admit it, sometimes old stuff is better.
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Last edited by Dillster : 11 November 2012 at 04:57 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #2
That's nothing until you see the stuff Japan was making in the 70's and 80's.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=707H-InHUkI

And the sort of shows we used to get on TV:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=jyukifAmPNo


So yeah, animation back then was the win. I think it had something to do with labor costs and the pressure to drop budgets...

But you're right a lot of the animation quality these days isn't very good.
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Old 11 November 2012   #3
The thing about the Warner Brothers stuff especially the era of Chuck Jones, Bugs vs. Daffy, things like that, are that while there are simple plots, physical gags, and simple humor, there are also some great subtle jokes and other things that no kid will catch, but the parents totally will, and then you can appreciate it later when you are old enough to get it.

The best animated stuff still does that, and a lot of good animated films carry that too, there's something for every age in it, and not pandering to anyone specific.

Stuff like the Road Runner is amazing also because it's just pure sight gags and physical humor, and the timing is nearly flawless. The stuff works on its own and needs very little context.

I think there are still creators and studios that carry all those principles through now, because they are universal and still apply, even if you have to be more PC and watch out for S&P.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #4
Oh yeah, and they were written differently too. Yes, definitely that made them better.

Sorry I just had to break out all the electronic music and lasers and electro-magnetic field things... I mean, those helped make the old shows awesome too... :P
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Old 11 November 2012   #5
Originally Posted by hypercube: The thing about the Warner Brothers stuff especially the era of Chuck Jones, Bugs vs. Daffy, things like that, are that while there are simple plots, physical gags, and simple humor, there are also some great subtle jokes and other things that no kid will catch, but the parents totally will, and then you can appreciate it later when you are old enough to get it.


My wife and I have been into the WB cartoons since childhood and couldn't wait til our boy was old enough to watch them. We got a box set and sat down with him and we were both kind of shocked at the (for lack of a better word) course-ness of them. They were angry and violent and snarky and so full of stereotypes that we basically put him off watching them. There was also occasional racism and borderline homophobia throughout, too.

It's sad how PC cartoons have become (or are simply adverts in disguise), but there's some merit to that, too. I still love the old ones since they were the product of a time and place that is long vanished, and the age I first watched them was a different one, too. And of course the craftsmanship is still impeccable. But I probably won't be letting my son watch them until he's old enough to understand the context they were produced in.
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Old 11 November 2012   #6
Something I like about the classics - if you start with some of the earliest Merry Melodies, Silly Symphonies, etc., you can watch the rules slowly being put into place. The animators were making it up as they went, constantly experimenting and pushing things further...
That sense of inventiveness seems to be missing from today's cartoons.
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Old 11 November 2012   #7
Originally Posted by Dillster: characters got hit with hammers and clubs, smoked cigarettes, fell off cliffs, got shot with blunderbusses and always survived. They had funny voices and cracked jokes I could understand at 5 years of age. The plots were uncomplicated with none of the good v evil things or deep thought plots that just do my head in with some new cartoons. They were not political or religious, or offensive to any part of society, at least not that I can see. They were just plain made for kids, to make kids laugh.

I had to giggle at your description because it is how I remember them. They have a simple power that I suspect aint so simple.
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Old 11 November 2012   #8
And they were not talking as much as today, sometimes not at all but you get everything, they were universal
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Old 11 November 2012   #9
I still think coyote and roadrunner is by far the best animated series/shorts ever made. They get me laughing just thinking about certain gags.

That said, I have a huge, huge dislike for the "good old days" mentality. I see it so often on these forums, and in general. Movies used to be better, music used to be better, etc. I simply don't agree, and I think the fact that people have been saying that since the dawn of time is a good sign that it's just never true.

The biggest problem is only the amazing, good quality stuff stands the test of time, and is still around decades later. So when we look at things made back in the 50's, we're only seeing the best of the best. Of course it'll look like things were better back then.
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Old 11 November 2012   #10
Ok one piece of advice is that we shopuld start mentioning the names of the master animator and directors that produced these mini masterpieces.
My beef my modern media is that content is anonymized to the Nth dregee.

We stand on the shoulder of giants like:
Maurice Noble
Chuck Jones
Tex Avery
William Hanna and Joseph Barbera
Bob Clampett
Friz Freleng


Here are some samples:
Tex Avery
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZCyJKJilC0
Chuck Jones:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wdW...feature=related
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 11 November 2012 at 03:57 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #11
While I definitely agree as far as animation quality of the classic series, some of the writing of animated series now is really sharp and far more entertaining than when I was a kid.

Shows like Phineas and Ferb, Gravity Falls, etc., are pretty darn funny for a viewer of any age.
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Old 11 November 2012   #12
I can still watch old cartoons-though some people like Freleng who made some funny cartoons also loved to recycle the same gags into later series--such as the Ant and the Aardvark. That's when the theatrical cartoon went into decline.


I wish movies didnt used to be better-I just notice it in the writing, directing, the editing, the acting and the scoring.
Most surprising how uncharismatic some star actors are these days--they get hired for appearance but are boring to watch.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #13
Originally Posted by fig: .

Shows like Phineas and Ferb, Gravity Falls, etc., are pretty darn funny for a viewer of any age.


Also I would add to that list
MotorCity and Tron.

They are fantastic.


Anyway there are some really good traditional animation on TV
Foster's home of Imaginary Friends
Powerpuff Girls
And yes...God help me, My Little Pony
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Old 11 November 2012   #14
Originally Posted by Michael5188: ......The biggest problem is only the amazing, good quality stuff stands the test of time, and is still around decades later.......


Yes you are probably right, some stuff just appeals to new generations. I remember in school before Christmas around 2004/2005 when I was 9 or 10 I think, they played an old Laurel and Hardy film for us as part of the school Christmas party before we broke for Christmas. It was in black and white, and we wouldn't normally watch anything black and white if you paid us. Plus it was made probably 60 or 70 years before we were born. But we didn't have much choice seeing as it was in the daily prison we called school.
Anyway the film was about Laurel and Hardy trying to get a piano up a load of steps and into a house at the top. After the initial grumblings while we waited to be bored to tears, they played the film. We all laughed our heads off the whole way through, I don't think I ever laughed as much at a film up to then. My stomach was sore from a mixture of lemonade, sweets and cakes all mixed up by non stop laughing.
So I told my Dad about it when I got home and he remembered watching it when he was younger, and so did my Grandad and Granduncle. My Christmas stocking that year had (among other things) a DVD of Laurel and Hardys which we watched for hours on Christmas day. Imagine that, a whole family of a wide age range watching the same thing together and all laughing. My Granduncles age was about 78, Grandad about 70, Dad I think 43, my aunt probably 35 (but only admitted 29), my 5 cousins and me between 9 and 15.
That was a good Christmas, Laurel and Hardy were partly to thank for that.
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Old 11 November 2012   #15
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