The bigger the screen the bigger the eye strain

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  06 June 2013
The bigger the screen the bigger the eye strain

So I've been looking at past threads about what kind of monitor is best for prolonged use and least eyestrain. All the threads are at least a few years old. I have currently an Apple Cinema Display 23" HD that is silver and matte. I bought it before Apple came out with those crappy glossy displays. Still, it looks nice and the picture resolution and screen is beautiful but after an hour my eyes feel like they've been launched into the center of the sun. It doesn't matter how many breaks I take after or rub my eyes or put eye drops in them it's just like they're on fire.

I've been using a old Macbook for general computer use and my eyes feel fine. The strange thing is that it is a glossy display. It's one of the silver and black laptops. But the screen size is only 15 inches. You'd think the bigger the screen the easier it would be to see more clearly and work more efficiently. It makes me wonder though if the bigger the monitor and resolution is better or if it's just marketing to artists to make them buy their latest product.

I always thought CRTs were worse for your eyes yet I never really had a problem with them for eye strain. Now that I have a "hip" flat panel LCD screen my eyes hurt like never before. I guess CRTs aren't as bad as people say they are but where they might not bug your eyes they will break your back trying to move those suckers. Unfortunately, CRTs are now hard to find because they're so clunky. I'm not quite sure what would be the best idea since you can't exactly sit in a store for an hour at a time at each screen and see which of them hurts your eyes the least.
 
  06 June 2013
I experience less eye strain with the new flat, high resolution monitors.

Maybe you need to calibrate the monitor.

http://www.photofriday.com/i/calibration.gif
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  06 June 2013
Eyestrain is absolutely NOT directly related to the size of the screen.
Brightness, contrast, focal distance and size of the elements in relation to your particular ocular qualities are all that matters.

You're probably reacting more to a different focal distance and angle of viewing forced on you by a laptop, and possibly different defaults, than you are to the size of the display.

There are other factors as far as the more general neurological impact is (edge perception and so on), but pure eyestrain has nothing to do with the general size of the monitor, only the relative size and how nitid the contents you need to read are, and their placement at distance sufficient for your lens to be in a neutral state.

Talk to an oculist and an optician instead of coming up with bizarre theories on a web forum if you are concerned about your eye-sight
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  06 June 2013
I have plenty of eyestrain from various things but LCDs are definitely LIGHT YEARS ahead of CRTs for me, and I used CRTs for decades. The refresh rate nonsense was a nightmare. Modern monitors can still flicker from interference but it is a very different animal.

It is definitely more the other factors going on here I think. I have a 30" and 27" at 2560x and a 17" laptop at 1920 and the laptop bothers me much more long term than the big monitors.

I am very much looking forward to 4K 30" displays for real estate reasons but will have to see where everything shakes out as far as GUI size issues or if some kind of retina-style adaptation will need to be made to interface items.
 
  06 June 2013
Originally Posted by ThE_JacO: Eyestrain is absolutely NOT directly related to the size of the screen.
Brightness, contrast, focal distance and size of the elements in relation to your particular ocular qualities are all that matters.

You're probably reacting more to a different focal distance and angle of viewing forced on you by a laptop, and possibly different defaults, than you are to the size of the display.

There are other factors as far as the more general neurological impact is (edge perception and so on), but pure eyestrain has nothing to do with the general size of the monitor, only the relative size and how nitid the contents you need to read are, and their placement at distance sufficient for your lens to be in a neutral state.

Talk to an oculist and an optician instead of coming up with bizarre theories on a web forum if you are concerned about your eye-sight


It's not about my eye sight being bad it's about the fact that using the monitor I have on my Apple Desktop was a big 23 inch HD screen that I kept moving farther from my eyes and I used books to elevate it to eye level. While using the laptop, the screen doesn't bother me like the supposed better and bigger monitor. I've even tried turning down the brightness to practically nothing which helped a little bit but it didn't stop the burning from the big 23" inch monitor screen. I'm just wondering if there are like approved monitors from eye doctors or if anyone has any better luck with a certain kind of monitor that was easy on the eyes in more ways than one. ;p

I've read up on how EMF radiation can cause eye strain and maybe the bigger and brighter the monitor the more the radiation. Still, the monitor isn't that big. Anyone else remember those filters for computer screens back in the day? They were ugly and they don't exactly work if you work with color specific tasks (which doesn't work that well with CG) but I'm talking about these: http://www.kotulas.com/wcsstore/KOTStore/productreviews/pwr/product-reviews/4180/Home-Living/Office/Kotulas/p/122092-Anti-Glare-Computer-Monitor-Screen-Shield.html

Anyone else have any luck using computer screen shields in their work to prevent eye strain?
Plus all monitors are flat screens these days and I don't think anything could latch onto them without causing the monitor to be top heavy. Though perhaps I answered my own question as this website sells them custom to fit a screen. http://www.lessemf.com/computer.html Might have to take a look at them. If anyone has any personal experience or preferences to computer monitors and/ or shields input would be great. Thanks.
 
  06 June 2013
Your eyesight doesn't need to be bad to see an oculist or an optometrist.
I have above 20/20 eyesight (hyperfocality, over 21/20 one eye and 20.75 the other) and after a full suite of tests they still recommended tweaks to how I work, listed things that will be less relevant to me that therefore I have manouvering space with, and offered (and I got) a pair of relaxing glasses to shift the focal plane slightly so that my eyes could be relaxed while working at the correct distance from the monitor without having to distance the stand itself too much.

If your eyes are strained consult a specialist that can examine them, not the internets or some fraud filter screen salesman (they don't work 99% of the time for most people).

Edit: I might need to use more smileys... I'm not giving you s*** ebbandflow, I'm genuinely and heartily recommend you visit a specialist at the first sign of eyestrain to PREVENT bad eyesight.
Except for the very bloody unlikely chance that there might be a competent doctorate in optology posting in General Discussion most of what you will get here will be either awfully generic, or in the worse cases potentially unrelated or mis-related and damaging.
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Last edited by ThE_JacO : 06 June 2013 at 08:49 AM.
 
  06 June 2013
You might want to also check on the light level where you work. Offices where computing tasks are carried out should have a LUX level of about 500. It shouldn't be too high and it shouldn't be too low. Lots of offices actually have too dim a light level.

Light meters ain't too expensive you should be able to get one for about U$30-U$50.
 
  06 June 2013
Having a properly lit environment and monitor settings is critical for your eyes. Most people don't know how to create a good working environment for prolonged computer usage.

When you look at your monitor, your peripheral vision shouldn't see anything that's a lot brighter than what your monitor is displaying, such as a light source, a bright window, etc. You need to put anything bright away from your peripheral vision, such as placing light sources to your side, above, or behind you. If your monitor is glossy, don't have anything behind you that will reflect in the screen (to the side and slightly behind, and/or above is good). If you have a bright window or visible light sources in your peripheral vision, you'll need to move your desk or move the light sources (or both)

The amount of light being output by your light source should be roughly equal to or slightly darker than the average brightness of your display. Too bright and it's glaring/distracting/fatiguing, and too dark will do the reverse, which is to make your screen appear too bright/fatiguing.

The best kind of lighting is soft, diffused lighting. For example, let's say you have a lamp with a movable neck, instead of using it like you normally would, you should point it at the ceiling so you get a soft, diffused bounce light that's very even and soothing from your ceiling. You can point it to a wall or a corner too--just make sure you don't create bright a hotspot that violates the previously mentioned criteria.

Based on that logic, your monitor should also be adjusted according to your environment. When it's bright, then raise the monitor's brightness to match, and if it's dark, lower the brightness.

Take hourly breaks to stretch your neck, shoulder, back, etc while also resting your eyes. Set an hourly alarm to do so (with freeware apps), or you will forget.
 
  06 June 2013
I guess maybe that would explain why my eyes always feels better in a room with tungsten light source than a fluorescent light. Maybe that's just me but in an old building with hospital-like fluorescent over head lights I always feel sick. Once I leave I always feel better.

It does remind me though once when I took a class field trip to Rhythm and Hues at their old location back in 2007. The rooms were very large and the walls I believe were all black. The hallways had white walls. Each desk had like a desk light a well. Still I was paying more attention to the work they were doing on the Incredible Hulk and the Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor. The whole facility where they worked wasn't very bright but it wasn't terribly dark either but it did remind me of like a dark cave. I'm not sure how other FX facilities light their workplaces though.

Of course this was all before they moved to their new facility in El Segundo as their old place was in Marina Del Rey. It was like a 10 minute drive from the school. And the rest they say is history as to what happened at that new place...Oh well.
 
  06 June 2013
It could also be how often you blink your eyes. Studies have shown that many people who spend hours in front of a monitor blink far less than they would otherwise.
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  06 June 2013
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