Voice-over workflow

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  05 May 2015
Voice-over workflow

Im working on a project which is basically an explanation video for an application. I have the script and story board worked out and basically just wanted to get some advice before I start recording.

Whats your usual method of working with voice-over? What techniques and tips do you use to make sure everything lines up and is in sync?
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  05 May 2015
Originally Posted by MoeGrfx: What techniques and tips do you use to make sure everything lines up and is in sync?


Well, that really depends on who's reading. If it's professional speaker, they will not loose the pace if they make a mistake. If it's not, then, good luck. I've worked with both professionals, and absolute beginners. Once, the (beginner) speaker read me text of 2 minutes, for about 40 minutes.

One tip I can give you (or whoever who will read the text), is, if they make a mistake, then they just stop for a several seconds, and go again with that sentence. That silent part will be visible in the sound graph in any editing software you're using for editing the voice over (Sound Forge, Premiere, Avid... etc). So you will know that there is mistake in that part, and edit it properly.
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  05 May 2015
I use a computer voice as a preview pass for our industrial visualisations. This preview get's refined with the client. They can change something in the speaker script until they're happy. If all is working and approved, the professional speaker get's the preview as a timing reference, together with the exact time markings that act as a time maximum (and sometimes as a time minimum).

Try to get a professional speaker if your budget allows it... really. And respect the voice actors, do everything to make their live easier, because you will hear it.

Cheers
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Last edited by Xharthok : 05 May 2015 at 02:52 PM.
 
  05 May 2015
Originally Posted by d4rk3lf: One tip I can give you (or whoever who will read the text), is, if they make a mistake, then they just stop for a several seconds, and go again with that sentence. That silent part will be visible in the sound graph in any editing software you're using for editing the voice over (Sound Forge, Premiere, Avid... etc). So you will know that there is mistake in that part, and edit it properly.

The voice actor is also a highly experienced song producer so im not too worried about the sound editing. awesome tip though, thanks!

Quote: I use a computer voice as a preview pass for our industrial visualisations. This preview get's refined with the client. They can change something in the speaker script until they're happy. If all is working and approved, the professional speaker get's the preview as a timing reference, together with the exact time markings that act as a time maximum (and sometimes as a time minimum).

Great advice! I sorta did something similar by just splitting the script into segments and pairing them with a specific scene on the story board and than timed my self reading that segment! Im just hoping it all flows together nice.
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Behance - Dribbble - #Moetion
 
  05 May 2015
I also very often use a text-to-speech software (mine's called textaloud, but I think most will do) to lay down a reference voice. Which I then use to edit my whole piece to the rhythm, leaving a little margin before or after (real speakers need to breath and they may speak a little slower). The key is to have natural sounding voices, the standard ones usually don't really cut it. My favourite voices at this time are the ones from "acapela" and they cover most common languages and accents (US, UK, French, German, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese etc...). You can buy them for your TTS software or rent as a service.

I also have a decent microphone and sometime do the ref voice myself if it's in my mother tongue and the text isn't too long (but as most people, it's weird to listen to your own voice and you need to record it in a quiet environment, so even then, if I know I'll replace it with a profesionnal voice talent, I may use a synthetic voice).

This allows to test and review the text, see what's too long, what needs to be cut down or rephrased multiple times, so that when you actually go on and record the final voice you can be quick and confident, and save money.

If the client has the money and/or wants to be there to direct the takes, I'll rent a studio (one hour for a 2/3 min speech, make it two if you want to mix there as well). Otherwise, I more and more often use voice over services over the net, and it turned out great. I can choose the language, accent and kind of tone I want, people usually reply within the day uploading short excerpts, I select my favourite one (voice, acting, sound quality) and usually within a few hours and not more than 2 or 3 takes back and forth I get it down for a pretty decent price.
 
  05 May 2015
Yeah I definitely am gonna test out the Text to Speech method and see how it works out! Should be a convenient way to see if everything is roughly lined up properly, thanks!
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