Game app and Game Show Idea - Need Advice

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  09 September 2013
Question Game app and Game Show Idea - Need Advice

Hi all,
I have a game show idea for tv which can also be played as a game app just for fun...
Its unique and its fun as i have worked a lot to perfect it.
Well if any one wonders what is a game show, deal or no deal is an example of game show.
I wonder how to proceed with the idea ? If i make a game app and launch it as a free game app for multiple platforms, am i risking to loose the idea so that any producer can take it from there and makes a game show and i wont even know what happened. Or should i contact tv producers and skip the game app idea . Is there anyway to protect game show formats.
Thanx
 
  09 September 2013
so, like TimePlay?
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  09 September 2013
It is very difficult to protect your work if someone from another country uses it. That type of thing can be expensive and hard to deal with. Though it's very difficult to get any type of idea picked up whether it's a game idea or movie or whatever so I wouldn't worry about the idea being stolen.
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  09 September 2013
hey guys look whatr have i found
it will be useful to you all also

FRAPA.org
  • Format Registry
Format Registry

Free FRAPA Service for members only: Paper Format Registration

Established in 2000, the Paper Format Registry meanwhile contains more than 1000 format proposals. You can register creative work in (almost) every form with the FRAPA Paper Format Registry – treatments, scripts, story lines, DVDS etc. But please take into consideration to include as much detail as possible.

Create evidence of your work

The procedure is as easy as can be: Send two copies of your format proposal to the FRAPA Headquarters. You will than receive a stamped and registered copy of your format together with a confirmation letter and your personal registry number. The other copy of your format stays safe in the FRAPA Archive. Date of registration is the due to the date of reception in the FRAPA Headquarters. Confidentiality is of course guaranteed. FRAPA-members can also register formats with the Online Format Registry for 20 Euros per registration. Non-members pay 50 Euros.

FRAPA always recommends the registration of format proposals. It is credible evidence your work existed the moment you created it. How else do you want to prove you came up with the format first? The best evidence is a signed declaration by a neutral third-party custodian who swears that they received your manuscript on a certain date and has kept it in seclusion ever since. This is what registration with the FRAPA Paper Format Registry accomplishes.


frapa.org
 
  09 September 2013
Note that the game/app space may be very different to the TV space as far as protecting ideas goes, and you'd probably have more luck protecting a TV format that could be turned into a game than a game which could be turned into a TV show; where copyright generally only extends to the look and presentation of your game, not the format - this is mostly due to games being seen as artistic implementations or variations of ideas and mechanics (gameplay)... I don't know how protection is applied in TV programming, but I'd assume it's a lot mature than it is in the games industry.

I don't think this is exclusive to games though, as you still see TV co's trying to get a piece of other shows success without having to license it - not just to avoid paying for license fees, but to avoid all the red tape that goes with licensing.

A quick google finds a relevant piece from 2008:

http://variety.com/2008/tv/news/fra...rns-1117990611/

Quote: Disney has yet to issue a formal response to Frapa’s press release. Behind the scenes, however, execs have been assuring producers and agents that the memo has been completely misinterpreted by the Cologne-based org.

Originally published online by Deadline Hollywood Daily in June, the memo urges showrunners and executive producers to “carefully scrutinize” whether licensing foreign formats “is necessary or appropriate.”

“Often-times what is appealing in the format may be nothing more than a general underlying premise, which, in and of itself, may be no reason to license the underlying property,” it argues.

It also warns producers that the involvement of foreign producers might add “an unnecessary layer to the creative process” and points to other downsides, such as the “significant costs” of format fees and exec production fees.
 
  09 September 2013
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