Maya 2012 Help & Chrome vs. IE

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  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by Kakkoii: Please, explain what has changed about Windows since 199x that makes registry management/cleaning tools irrelevant. Since you are clearly the expert on everything Windows.

The registry system hasn't changed very much, the issues that happened back in the 90's still happen today, even more frequently now actually, due to the increased complexity and abilities of programs, combined with poor coding skills by many developers that leave problems and junk data behind, slowing down your computers performance. Which is the main cause of the infamous Windows slow down that has become a staple of anti-windows complaints.

What's changed? Computers don't behave like piss drunk snails any more. They actually perform well. I really am not an expert, but I can guarantee you that on any modern hardware, cleaning up a handful of database entries is not going to give you the performance boost you think it's going to give you.

Meanwhile, what these registry "cleaners" can do is something unpleasant, despite its best intentions. I'll just post this here.

Let's not lose focus on the issue at hand - it's Maya's help file that's not launching from within Maya. It's at worst an annoyance. Recommending registry cleaners for something like this is...not recommended.

1998, a not so randomly chosen date, was a time of rather bad OS design. NT-based operating systems and Microsoft's own internal housekeeping tools have since pretty much voided the need to have to run a registry cleaner. Much like having to run a defrag utility every now and then - it's just so yesteryear.

The registry cleaner will undoubtedly clean up some unused entries, but the biggest advantage to that is purely psychological. The risk that it will "clean" up some used entries is quite real. The disadvantage to that, unfortunately, is not just psychological.
 
  05 May 2011
@fabittar: Did reinstalling Chrome fix your issue? It seems you should want to reinstall Chrome way, way before tweaking Maya or anything, to be honest. I don't know how fluid Chrome is though; Firefox, not so much. Reinstalling Firefox is faster with AddonFox, but still takes time to get back up to speed with my personal customizations.

My question is, I guess, why Chrome? Is there any reason you're tied to Chrome in conjunction with Maya? I'm not naysaying your choice in browser really, but Chrome seems the least feature-rich of all so far. I'd rather use Safari, and I don't even know what Safari is.

@eikonoklastes: You really should try an application before analyzing it. I do concur there are a lot of BS registry cleaners out there, but CCleaner is not one of them. Even if you never used the Registry Cleaner aspect, there are tons of benefits to using CCleaner.

(last elbow-dig) I'll bet you still empty your Recycle Bin, don't you son?


Hah! You know that one was good! Feel the screen-pain. (grins)
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Last edited by InfernalDarkness : 05 May 2011 at 06:16 AM.
 
  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by InfernalDarkness: I'll bet you still empty your Recycle Bin, don't you son?

Of course not. I use Piranha Teeth's File Exploder for that. Their motto is: Swinging the Sledgehammer at Ants is Fun.

I recommend it to everyone.

It helps if you play this song while doing it.

Last edited by eikonoklastes : 05 May 2011 at 06:29 AM.
 
  05 May 2011
I am actually using Chrome instead of Firefox on my Computer because I felt it better (it's quite heavier on RAM but with 4GB I don't care a lot)
Actually there is only IE9 (is it really a browser?) and Firefox 6.0a1 with a x64 architecture so I'm still using chrome because FF is not stable and chrome is more rapid downloading files or loading pages...

For your discussion about Windows slowdown I just say: ccleaner is not too bad but quite useless, it won't find real issues in you registry.
I am actually using a 3rd part tool (paid) which can find issues on your registry (of course you have to check what is it doing!), can delete junk files and can defrag your registry (only cleaning it is not so useful)
But the best features is the unistaller: it unistall a program (by its own unistaller) and after looks for junk files and regitry keys left orphane by this program. You should do it manually everytime you unistall an application if you want to prevent your pc from slowdown!
 
  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by eikonoklastes: What's changed? Computers don't behave like piss drunk snails any more. They actually perform well. I really am not an expert, but I can guarantee you that on any modern hardware, cleaning up a handful of database entries is not going to give you the performance boost you think it's going to give you.

Meanwhile, what these registry "cleaners" can do is something unpleasant, despite its best intentions. I'll just post this here.

Let's not lose focus on the issue at hand - it's Maya's help file that's not launching from within Maya. It's at worst an annoyance. Recommending registry cleaners for something like this is...not recommended.

1998, a not so randomly chosen date, was a time of rather bad OS design. NT-based operating systems and Microsoft's own internal housekeeping tools have since pretty much voided the need to have to run a registry cleaner. Much like having to run a defrag utility every now and then - it's just so yesteryear.

The registry cleaner will undoubtedly clean up some unused entries, but the biggest advantage to that is purely psychological. The risk that it will "clean" up some used entries is quite real. The disadvantage to that, unfortunately, is not just psychological.


edit: Please don't 'tl;dr' XD, so many people do that when a discussion gets this big :(

Of course the noticeable performance gains diminish as processing power to compensate increases, but all that means is it takes longer for enough issues to build up to create a noticeable impact on average. And it's no excuse to just let things get messy. Not to mention it's not just about performance, but about preventing issues from building up and leading to quite noticeable problems. Having junk files scattered around your hard drive and operating system files increases seek times also, it feels nice when everything is clean and working at the optimum performance for your hardware.

And, OMG! OH NO! What will I ever do if my recently used file list was emptied!! Such a tragedy, clearly CCleaner can do horrible things to your system. <_< If you bothered to read the whole thread, it was an accident by the user, not knowing that CCleaner can clean things that a few users might not want cleaned, such as the recently used file history (I personally disable that feature in Windows, since it's not useful for much.) CCleaner isn't an extremely deep registry cleaner like some of the ones that cost money. It only touches registry entries that are safe to be messing with. The more powerful registry cleaners out there can indeed screw up your system, as they try to fix core Windows registry settings, which can sometimes be false positives. Such registry issues are usually virus related though, which is a whole nother topic..

You're trying to make it seem like it's bad for them to include such a ability. CCleaner gives you a list of the problems it found before you choose to clean them. And lists what type of problem it is, such as: Unused File Extension, Invalid Firewall Rule, Invalid or Empty file class, Missing MUI reference, Unused registry key, etc... And then gives further details about it on the right.

You can then check mark what you do and don't want it to fix. Hell, you can even choose to filter out types of problems before you Analyze for problems using the left panel.

The program won't do anything you don't tell it to do. Plain and simple. Under the hands of a not very computer wise user, can it delete some fairly frivolous stuff that might matter to some a bit? Sure, and that's about it. And that's also what registry backups are for, so people new to this sort of thing can learn from their mistakes and become power users.

And no, Windows registry housekeeping skills have barely changed at all since the NT days. If a program leaves behind junk or creates some issue, Windows usually won't be any the wiser. But yes, Windows Vista and 7 have improved a fair bit with disc fragmentation, although it still does happen, and I'll defrag once in a blue moon still. But once we all shift to SSD's, yeah, defragmentation is pretty much dead. As it doesn't matter too much where the data is in the memory. And an internal chip takes care of spreading out the data to less used sectors so that the read/write cycles are evenly spread out across the chip for maximum life expectancy.

CCleaner is more than just a registry cleaner, its file cleaner is its other major feature and is quite handy also, cleaning out tons of different junk files. I could go on quite a bit about this feature also, but I would rather suggest you actually go and try out CCleaner a little bit before posting your next reply. CCleaner isn't the #1 recommended Windows maintenance app by LifeHacker for no reason.

Last edited by Kakkoii : 05 May 2011 at 07:22 AM.
 
  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by Kakkoii:
And, OMG! OH NO! What will I ever do if my recently used file list was emptied!! Such a tragedy, clearly CCleaner can do horrible things to your system. <_<

Sigh. Are you deliberately trying to evade the point? The point is the Unpredictability of Registry Cleaners, by the way, and the Lessening Importance of Them in the Context of Modern Computers, Especially to Tackle Trivial Issues.

I just posted one example. The mother-lode's here .

CCleaner might be an awesome app in its own right and good for them too. If you want to sweep your registry for your peace of mind and the billionth of a second you'll possibly gain in performance, go right ahead.

Side note: I haven't seen such an impassioned defense of fringe software for ages! Someone should get the CCleaner devs in here. It will warm their hearts.

Last edited by eikonoklastes : 05 May 2011 at 07:43 AM.
 
  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by eikonoklastes: Sigh. Are you deliberately trying to evade the point? The point is the Unpredictability of Registry Cleaners, by the way, and the Lessening Importance of Them in the Context of Modern Computers, Especially to Tackle Trivial Issues.

I just posted one example. The mother-lode's here .

CCleaner might be an awesome app in its own right and good for them too. If you want to sweep your registry for your peace of mind and the billionth of a second you'll possibly gain in performance, go right ahead.

Side note: I haven't seen such an impassioned defense of fringe software for ages! Someone should get the CCleaner devs in here. It will warm their hearts.


There's nothing unpredictable about this registry cleaner. It seems you merely don't want to admit you are wrong for once. It leaves all decisions up to the user. And trivial is subjective. At least you managed to admit it "might be an awesome app in its own right" which is a step in the right direction, away from your earlier comments.

I use it more for the file cleaning feature. I don't clean the registry just for performance reasons, I clean it for the sake of it being clean also. Stop talking about it like it's the same as any other registry cleaner our there, it's quite ignorant.

An it's not a defense of software, it's a defense of truth. I'm this passionate about any topic I discuss. And you not knowing about a piece of software does not make it "fringe software", quit with the large ego already.
 
  05 May 2011
Originally Posted by Kakkoii: There's nothing unpredictable about this registry cleaner. It seems you merely don't want to admit you are wrong for once. It leaves all decisions up to the user. And trivial is subjective. At least you managed to admit it "might be an awesome app in its own right" which is a step in the right direction, away from your earlier comments.

I use it more for the file cleaning feature. I don't clean the registry just for performance reasons, I clean it for the sake of it being clean also. Stop talking about it like it's the same as any other registry cleaner our there, it's quite ignorant.

An it's not a defense of software, it's a defense of truth. I'm this passionate about any topic I discuss. And you not knowing about a piece of software does not make it "fringe software", quit with the large ego already.

My dear fellow CG person. From the earlier links I've posted, it's quite definitely apparent that the software is not always predictable.

The fact that you have to back up the registry is a pretty strong indicator that it cannot be relied on 100%, confirmations notwithstanding.

Yes, it might be awesome in doing what it says it does: remove broken links in the registry.

In terms of performance gained by "optimizing" the registry, it's still an irrelevant piece of software and hence its status as being "fringe software" will expand to eventually relegate it to obsolescence (at least the registry sweeping part).

Is it my ego that's too big for not knowing/caring about this, or your ego that's too big for knowing about it and thus apportioning a large amount of importance to it? That's a pickle my friend. Perhaps 50-50?

In terms of fixing problems, I guess your mileage may vary. It might fix some, it might worsen the situation in others (see above links). My argument has been consistent throughout: don't use this when you have safer alternatives, especially when the issue is trivial. Jesus! Must be the 4th time I've had to say this.
 
  05 May 2011
Personally, I think your first post in this thread was unwarranted and rude, and since then you have flown steadily down hill, passing the ground contact point.

Kakkoii has done nothing but suggest a possible solutions for the problem, more than you did.
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  05 May 2011
Let's all just lighten up okay? Why is every one so serious?

Wes, I suggested reinstalling Maya which was not mentioned anywhere else in the thread. The OP hasn't returned with any feedback.

Formatting the hard drive and reinstalling is technically also a solution. But not really a solution. Similarly with running a registry cleaner. Might work, might not work, but also might screw something up and also completely unnecessary in the context of the situation - hence, not really a solution.

If I have been rude to anyone, I apologize. I had no intention of being so. I do have an affinity for being caustic and direct, which is often interpreted as rudeness.
 
  10 October 2011
Originally Posted by fabittar: This is annoying and I tried everything I could think of...

About a week ago I uninstalled Google Chrome, everything seemed to be fine, I set IE to default and it works as you'd expect: opening links, etc and other programs will always use IE for browsing.

Except Maya...

No matter what I do (even editing the registry, hunting down anything to do with Google) Maya 2012 won't open ANY links requiring a web browser because it defaults to a non-existant Google Chrome. I get this warning every f&*#$ time: "Windows cannot find 'ChromeHTML\shell\open\command'. Make sure you typed the name correctly."

Help? Maybe I should just give up and reinstall Google Chrome? The worst part is not knowing who to blame, Google or Autodesk.


I found that
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\.htm
was set to
ChromeHTML

even though my default browser was IE.

So I changed it back to htmlfile, and voila, Maya 2012 opened the online help in IE again.
 
  10 October 2012
Smile Another Fix

I was getting an error stating that ChromeHTML shell/open/command could not be found. I use IE (Because I love IE that is why I use it).

What fixed it was going to:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\ChromeHTML,

I right clicked on
shell

and added a new key called
open

and then right clicked on the new key labeled open and created a new key called
command

and that fixed it for me.
 
  02 February 2013
Thumbs up Maya default browser override registry hack

Hello everyone,

if you want to override the strange Maya behavior of better knowing what browsing your default application is than you and your OS than try this (NOTE: Editing the registry can crash your OS, although these steps are really easy to do! Use the following at your own risk!):

1) Open the Windows registry with "regedit.exe" (the standard registry editor of Windows, use Windows search in the start menu or the "run.." menu to launch).

2) If Maya opens your weblinks with Chrome go to:
"\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\ChromeHTML\sh ell\open\command"

Otherwise replace "ChromeHTML\.." with "Opera.HTML\.." for Opera or "FirefoxHTML\.." for Firefox etc.

3) Replace the entry in the key "(Default)" with the path / start-string of the browser you want Maya to use, for example launching Opera by hitting F1 in Maya instead of the accidentally started browser:

new value is "C:\Program Files\Opera x64\Opera.exe" "%1"

4) Restart Maya, done.

Side-effects possible, but should work smoothly
 
  02 February 2013
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