TOTAL RECALL is Totally Forgettable Say Reviews

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Old 07 July 2013   #106
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: I couldn't find anything entertaining about watching a live action platformer personally, but I can see why people found it entertaining.


It's true that the pace seemed relentless in the 2012 Total Recall film.
It was done to the extent that it became its own problem.

The first thing I had trouble remembering from the new film was Cohagen himself. Stark contrast to the 1990 film where he is one of the first things you remember.

Cheezy lines help in that regard for an actor who can use them.

Originally Posted by Total Recall 1990: Vilos Cohaagen: Kuato wants what's in Quaid's head, and he might be able to get it 'cause they say he's psychic; and I have a plan to keep this from happening. Do you think you could play along?

Richter: Yes, sir.

Vilos Cohaagen: Great, 'cause otherwise, I'll erase your ass!



LOL.... bad lines, yes, but when "delivered earnestly" these scenes turn into gold!
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Old 07 July 2013   #107
The twists and turns in the original movie worked IMO because the entire thing was actually pretty fresh at the time. They built a completely new unique world and movie universe and had a pretty compelling, if at times ridiculous, story. This new version is NOT a "re-imagining" of the original short story, it's a tweaked remake of the original movie, and there's no getting around the fact that even with the new unique world (they did a pretty good job of building, aside from the stupid elevator), it could never feel totally fresh, because we'd been there before.

They're not mind blowing revelations and plot turns in the 90s TR, but they are really good and clever, IMO, especially for a big crazy ultraviolent Arnold sci-fi movie. Not all of them were telegraphed AND they did a fantastic job of never tipping their hand as to whether the entire thing was real or not, all the way through to the end credits. That's amazingly difficult to pull off, and I'd wager totally impossible to do properly nowadays (which they didn't), if even for the fact it'd all be spoiled in the trailers. The 90s version setup with the doctor "entering" his alleged "episode" was handled very well and they still didn't break any rules after that, he could have still been right.

(an argument could be made that because you see scenes with characters when Quaid isn't there, it is therefore real vs. all his POV, but that's some slack I'm willing to cut them)

How many times can you get that combination of any kind of thoughtful plot along with fun cheese and insane action and interesting sci-fi elements? Blomkamp seems to be as close as we can hope for nowadays.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #108
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: It's true that the pace seemed relentless in the 2012 Total Recall film.
It was done to the extent that it became its own problem.




Not just the fast pace, but the action pieces were literally platform sequences. Run away, jump to something lower to avoid gunfire, jump to a higher level to avoid missile. Escape to next level. I say all this as one of the few (Apparently) very big colin farrell fans. I think he's one of the most underappreciated actors around.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #109
Originally Posted by hypercube: The twists and turns in the original movie worked IMO because the entire thing was actually pretty fresh at the time. They built a completely new unique world and movie universe and had a pretty compelling, if at times ridiculous, story. This new version is NOT a "re-imagining" of the original short story, it's a tweaked remake of the original movie, and there's no getting around the fact that even with the new unique world (they did a pretty good job of building, aside from the stupid elevator), it could never feel totally fresh, because we'd been there before.

They're not mind blowing revelations and plot turns in the 90s TR, but they are really good and clever, IMO, especially for a big crazy ultraviolent Arnold sci-fi movie. Not all of them were telegraphed AND they did a fantastic job of never tipping their hand as to whether the entire thing was real or not, all the way through to the end credits. That's amazingly difficult to pull off, and I'd wager totally impossible to do properly nowadays (which they didn't), if even for the fact it'd all be spoiled in the trailers. The 90s version setup with the doctor "entering" his alleged "episode" was handled very well and they still didn't break any rules after that, he could have still been right.

(an argument could be made that because you see scenes with characters when Quaid isn't there, it is therefore real vs. all his POV, but that's some slack I'm willing to cut them)

How many times can you get that combination of any kind of thoughtful plot along with fun cheese and insane action and interesting sci-fi elements? Blomkamp seems to be as close as we can hope for nowadays.


It's really about the minutes. I think. How to use them to good effect.
Every director has their way, Verhoeven's classic trope is "All the Bad Guys Need a Meeting"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MU4U1oeCMO8

You think about it, the 2012 Cohagen didn't have anyone to play off against, never hinted more about this or that new thing, and the villains seemed to just "surround" Quaid and never consorted between themselves in ways that created a sense of need between them.

Verhoeven's "Bad Guy Meetings" were useful because they also laid down personality traits, revealed the stakes involved (and not just winning or losing against the good guy) and these scenes would setup what roles these characters would be involved in when the inevitable big action bits occurred.
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Old 07 July 2013   #110
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: Not just the fast pace, but the action pieces were literally platform sequences. Run away, jump to something lower to avoid gunfire, jump to a higher level to avoid missile. Escape to next level. I say all this as one of the few (Apparently) very big colin farrell fans. I think he's one of the most underappreciated actors around.


I'm not going to complain too much about that as I liked that "main action" aspect....Again, I think it reflects the physical progress of the Visual Effects and capabilities of our current time.

I do think what is true is too many of these scenes remained "unsupported". Lori is playing the "video game boss" for the nth time in the 2012 TR film because she's still on the same mission she was at the start.

There is no new "escalation" of the plan, nor is she given new methods or something to use, she doesn't "feel" anything in these sequences... she's just a really mean woman!

To do this properly would REDUCE the minutes of the action, or change the manner in which these scenes occur. That they run in "game mode" for so long is because they rely on little else from other scenes to define them.
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Old 07 July 2013   #111
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan:
I honestly didn't feel any shock in the 1990 picture, because you cannot evaluate for certain whether Hauser is the "real Schwarzenegger character" or it's the Schwarzenegger who scoffs: "Now that is the best mind-f*ck ever" when supposedly it is revealed to him that his memory re-write was Cohagen's plan.



Well I think you can evaluate he is the real character if you follow what Hauser said earlier in the film and the fact that he's buddy buddy with Cohaagen in the video. Its clearly not a lie because when Richter tells Cohaagen they have to kill Quaid he isnt happy about it. Quaid didnt believe Cohaagen UNTIL he saw the video. Quaid's decision not to go back to being Hauser was a David Cronenberg contribution to the story.


Originally Posted by hypercube: How many times can you get that combination of any kind of thoughtful plot along with fun cheese and insane action and interesting sci-fi elements? Blomkamp seems to be as close as we can hope for nowadays.


And that's sad because he is no Verhoeven or McTiernan and as a writer is far removed from the leagues of professionals from the 80s. How Hollywood completely changed within 20 years.
Not a long time.

Last edited by kelgy : 07 July 2013 at 08:13 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #112
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: I'm not going to complain too much about that as I liked that "main action" aspect....Again, I think it reflects the physical progress of the Visual Effects and capabilities of our current time.

I do think what is true is too many of these scenes remained "unsupported". Lori is playing the "video game boss" for the nth time in the 2012 TR film because she's still on the same mission she was at the start.

There is no new "escalation" of the plan, nor is she given new methods or something to use, she doesn't "feel" anything in these sequences... she's just a really mean woman!

To do this properly would REDUCE the minutes of the action, or change the manner in which these scenes occur. That they run in "game mode" for so long is because they rely on little else from other scenes to define them.

Agreed. Maybe this is what Hollywood is trying to appeal to the video game crowd-with scripts and story lines to match. It seems quite probable these days.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #113
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: I'm not going to complain too much about that as I liked that "main action" aspect....Again, I think it reflects the physical progress of the Visual Effects and capabilities of our current time.

I do think what is true is too many of these scenes remained "unsupported". Lori is playing the "video game boss" for the nth time in the 2012 TR film because she's still on the same mission she was at the start.

There is no new "escalation" of the plan, nor is she given new methods or something to use, she doesn't "feel" anything in these sequences... she's just a really mean woman!

To do this properly would REDUCE the minutes of the action, or change the manner in which these scenes occur. That they run in "game mode" for so long is because they rely on little else from other scenes to define them.


I guess that's where we diverge. I want platformers in my video games, not my movies lol.
 
Old 07 July 2013   #114
Originally Posted by malcolmvexxed: I guess that's where we diverge. I want platformers in my video games, not my movies lol.


Hey, I did say that if there was more thought towards "plan escalation" or "character motives in action" that the MANNER of the sequences would change.

You might find this frequently results in less "video game" type action.

Although, yeah, without us working on an actual scene you and I could still be at loggerheads about that kinda stuff. hehehe.
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Old 07 July 2013   #115
Originally Posted by kelgy: Well I think you can evaluate he is the real character if you follow what Hauser said earlier in the film and the fact that he's buddy buddy with Cohaagen in the video. Its clearly not a lie because when Richter tells Cohaagen they have to kill Quaid he isnt happy about it. Quaid didnt believe Cohaagen UNTIL he saw the video. Quaid's decision not to go back to being Hauser was a David Cronenberg contribution to the story.


Yet another reason why the 1990 film is "more clever" is that the actors all had something to work with. Again, there are many comparisons but the most dramatic would be the two versions of Cohaagen.

The 1990 version had layers to him that added to your experience of watching the film. Of course, today he's a cheezy, ham-fisted bad guy bureaucrat..... BUT the point in these films was the characters were "allowed to play out".

The 2012 version is more buttoned down and serious, and relentless, but... not nearly as interesting.

The criticism of "Ronny Cox villains" is that "Bad guys can only act like that in the movies! It's not realistic!" But you know what? Screw realism! Bad guys that seem to have more layers to them and who can dominate scenes even when they have no weapons are fun!
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Old 07 July 2013   #116
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