3d printing and rapid protoyping info

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  08 August 2012
3d printing and rapid protoyping info

im looking to get into 3d print andy info guys?
 
  08 August 2012
Could you be more specific?

Q: Are you trying to print models you have made, and want to know how to set them up for printing?

Q: Are you looking for vendors that will print your model?

Q: Are you trying to purchase a 3D printer and want recommendations?

Ohmanoggin
 
  08 August 2012
How silly of me

Well now that you have stated those i actully needs all those questions answered,How to use it ,what formats,how much can i get a truely great one for?Dish out all the information you can so i can make a choice based on those.
 
  08 August 2012
I recommend looking at these two ZBrush plugins. The file format most common is "stl" (STereo Lithography). Most printers have a file size limit, so you'll want to use Decimation Master to reduce poly count. With the printers I have used, all objects printed need to be a single enclosed volume with ALL edges joined (welded).

3D Print Exporter
http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showth...-Print-Exporter

Decimation master
http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showth...-Update-on-P-15

We use an "Objet" 3D printer, but there are many other good ones. Not all printers provide the same level of detail or finish, so I would ask for "real" samples before I made a purchase.

The 3D printer plugin page has some good links for more info. There are always 3D printing service vendors posting in the main forum. You might ask these questions in the main forum for more responses.

Hope this helps,
Ohmanoggin
 
  08 August 2012
Ok things a getting warmer Guys

guys this is a good road for me post more information,lovely information .Im doing research you provided for me.


Originally Posted by Ohmanoggin: I recommend looking at these two ZBrush plugins. The file format most common is "stl" (STereo Lithography). Most printers have a file size limit, so you'll want to use Decimation Master to reduce poly count. With the printers I have used, all objects printed need to be a single enclosed volume with ALL edges joined (welded).

3D Print Exporter
http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showth...-Print-Exporter

Decimation master
http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showth...-Update-on-P-15

We use an "Objet" 3D printer, but there are many other good ones. Not all printers provide the same level of detail or finish, so I would ask for "real" samples before I made a purchase.

The 3D printer plugin page has some good links for more info. There are always 3D printing service vendors posting in the main forum. You might ask these questions in the main forum for more responses.

Hope this helps,
Ohmanoggin
 
  08 August 2012
Just be careful. If your entire business idea is to do 3D-prints you should know by now that many others have the same idea. I had the same idea, I have a small printer with a niche in stable models and a good pricerange for work. But you can't compete with larger companys running 10 machines of all sorts and sizes with returning customers. You need to have fairly high quality to match those and a degree to boot, often industrial clients will have their models measured (tolerances, form deviation etc) unless it's a print-to-touch. If your aiming at casual users and garage-geeks it will be hard to compete with online services (at least in the US/americas) and in Europe (at least Scandinavia) the prices have been pushed to the bottom, there's simply no margin left. You need to be able to find 10 customers per day, to get at least 3-6 builds per 24 hours. That means thousends of contacts per year, not just 2 or 3 per week. If you're thinking maker-bot, then perhaps you need to find less customers but they would likely bee non-professionals just playing about, so no business but it's fun to print at home too
Anyway, small printers today are dirt cheap for a company to buy. I'ts only the larger pieces with more expensive (and therefore durable) material they need to buy from others (and that's mid sized companys, any larger would have it's own workshop with 2-3 machines, people to run them and a workshop to do the rest like assembly, painting, metal parts, reinforcing parts etc).
Unless you live in a 3rd world country it's likely that the market has been saturated already.

Sorry...
 
  08 August 2012
thanks for advise

I see that you made a very compelling argument here ,and seems very on point in terms of business location,but im from the Caribbean and this business is not set for a large scale audience here,toys ,bust and product design is the area in which im aiming for.id keep searching and weighing my options for now.

Originally Posted by Spacedaniel: Just be careful. If your entire business idea is to do 3D-prints you should know by now that many others have the same idea. I had the same idea, I have a small printer with a niche in stable models and a good pricerange for work. But you can't compete with larger companys running 10 machines of all sorts and sizes with returning customers. You need to have fairly high quality to match those and a degree to boot, often industrial clients will have their models measured (tolerances, form deviation etc) unless it's a print-to-touch. If your aiming at casual users and garage-geeks it will be hard to compete with online services (at least in the US/americas) and in Europe (at least Scandinavia) the prices have been pushed to the bottom, there's simply no margin left. You need to be able to find 10 customers per day, to get at least 3-6 builds per 24 hours. That means thousends of contacts per year, not just 2 or 3 per week. If you're thinking maker-bot, then perhaps you need to find less customers but they would likely bee non-professionals just playing about, so no business but it's fun to print at home too
Anyway, small printers today are dirt cheap for a company to buy. I'ts only the larger pieces with more expensive (and therefore durable) material they need to buy from others (and that's mid sized companys, any larger would have it's own workshop with 2-3 machines, people to run them and a workshop to do the rest like assembly, painting, metal parts, reinforcing parts etc).
Unless you live in a 3rd world country it's likely that the market has been saturated already.

Sorry...
 
  08 August 2012
Well then I'd say go for a makerbot
http://www.makerbot.com/

Good luck!
 
  08 August 2012
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