Meet the Artist: Emile Ghorayeb

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  02 February 2006
wow thanks man!...its emillio secret exercise!!.. i will definitly try this and i hope i will be as good as you someday.you did one eps every 2 weeks on sitting ducks?...dishingout 55 sec animation in one week?...i thought im the only one, btw i like sitting ducks i even have the vcd.Can i ask you one last question?..(probably two) is it important to take acting class for animator?....btw have you ever been to jakarta? thanks again
 
  02 February 2006
week 2, part 6

nards26:

1) I'm only doing animation at work. And yes, i LOVE my job.
2) Madagascar: Julian Shrek: Fiona
3) 3DsMax is my choice package. I find I work well with it, and it's very intuitive comapred to other packages where it feels more like a bunch of calculations... my opinion, that's all.

lol, you have alot of energy, that's a good thing in this industry

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Robert Diaz:

I still create lame poses Rob. It's hard to keep inspiration at 100% all day, 5 days a week, so don't feel like you're not doing it right. Instead, take the time to really look at your animation. If your brain's fried, ask your mates. I do it all the time. So:

First, try to stay away from movements you have already seen before in other cartoons, and definitely push your poses. After watching your poses, it's easier to dial them back then to go back in there and push them more. Keep in mind that there are times you don't want to push the poses like when things are calm for example. Find the peak of the shot, and that's where you want your animation to shine most. The rest is just practice. None of us sat down one day and automatically created amazing poses. it takes time and attention to detail. Clear your mind of everything else and analyze them. Look at your pose [in context] and see if there's something you could do to it to make it feel better. DOn't be scared to sit there for 10 minutes on the same pose. Also, pay attention to your silhouette, is it reading right to the camera?

Hope it helps!

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mayj_kickass:

1) Shrek is done with maya and PDI proprietary software

2) I mainly use pose to pose, I figure the other way you're talking about is "straight forward"? If so, that would be really complaicated to do in 3D, and I'm positive my results wouldn't be as good as the ones I get now. Animating straight forward is mainly used by syop motion animators if I'm not mistaken.

3) I think I answered this already, so I hope I answer the same thing... lol. I'd have to say the second to last shot dancing on Shrek2 because of not only were there alot of characters, but getting the choreography right between Shrek and Donkey (when Donkey flips and disconnects from Puss), then connecting him with Fiona (after she looks ta him) so they can dance back to back together, all while being on a beat and making sure they dance properly. I was told that I made Fiona actually look sexy back then. lol. I'm proud of that one.

All that partying, dancing and Djing during the past 15 years turned out to finally be very useful there.

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thimsj:

Dude, it's hard for me to answer that kind of question. I don't want to throw you in the wrong direction. There are a few things I can tell you. It definitely helps for you to have past experience. I'm sure there are 2D animators that have gotten hired in the past based on their 2D experience. One of my best friends Jason was hired here after being a stop motion animator at Aardman with no computer animation skills. Now he's unbelievably amazing. Another friend, Trey Thomas (Corpse Bride) is another guy who has done stop motion and 3D.

But I'll be honest, your stuff would have to be pretty darn good to pass off like that.
That's just my opinion though.

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thematt:

Dude, I've forgotten what the 12 principles are... lol. At this point, I rely on my feeling too. The problem I believe Sylvain was trying to stay away from is poses that are too harsh maybe? I dunno. It could've and probably was a multitude of things. I guess it depends of the film. In Shrek, you don't feel us hit the poses as much as in Madagascar. Each has it's own feel. I don't see why Triplettes would be any different, know what I mean?
__________________
Emile Ghorayeb | animator
 
  02 February 2006
Hi
Whats your Favorite rendering and modeling Software


Rendering? [MentalRay,Renderman or other software] ?

Modeling? [Only Max, (other from PDI Dreamworks )or maya and XSI too] ?
[sry for my bad English]
 
  02 February 2006
week 2, part 6

terminus_ad_quem:

Just a not that I worked on season 2 of Sitting Ducks. Acting calsses definitely help. I haven't taken many, but from the little that I did, I could see how much it would help.

And no, I've never been to Jakarta, but it is in my top 10 places to see

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IceFlame:

modeling: 3dsMax. But this is only because i just don't know how to model in any other software.
Rendering: PDI's rendering is the BOMB! As for personal use, I will be looking into Vray or Brazil once my short is ready to render.
__________________
Emile Ghorayeb | animator
 
  02 February 2006
hey emile,

me again...just got two more questions

1. do you have any advice about how to animate a slow action in cg? I remember the kung-fu granny in Madagascar being awesome...

2. If you have any time, would you please critique this animation I've made on maya?
here's the link: http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyholden/

thanks a lot. again, very much appreciated.
 
  02 February 2006
Wow, thanks so much for answering me, it means so much (I'm usualy ignored). I am seriously taking into consideration to apply for the animation mentor school, but I'll have to convince my parents to pay for it...hmm...I shall see, if I enter faculty with flying colors, I may have a chance.
__________________
me @ deviantfart
 
  02 February 2006
week 2, part 7

norman365:

1) Well, if you're talking about how to animate an old granny or something like that, whether she is cartoony or not, there a re always aspects that are the same. For example, because she's old, she usually can't move very easily because of her bones, muscles, etc. So, knowing this, steps should be small, she should definitely shake, etc. The trick is this: know the aspects that make her look old, and push them further than what they would be in real life, like shaking more, stuff like that.

2) Email me this link and I'll get to it for you sometime next week or so, no time right now

____________________________________________

Dimmur:

I suggest you do it.
__________________
Emile Ghorayeb | animator
 
  02 February 2006
That's it!

That's it everyone!

I had a wonderful time with all of you.

Thank you CGtalk and everyone involved, thank you Dreamworks, thank you Leigh, and thank you everyone for the great questions.

C ya on the flipside.

EmilioG, out.
__________________
Emile Ghorayeb | animator
 
  02 February 2006
Thanks a million, Emile!
__________________
leighvanderbyl.com
 
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