The Demise of Creativity

Become a member of the CGSociety

Connect, Share, and Learn with our Large Growing CG Art Community. It's Free!

THREAD CLOSED
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  07 July 2012
Originally Posted by kelgy: Ha I dont remember bodies being fused in the same strategic way in Re-animator but I only saw the first one.


You are right about the first one. This was only a zombie reanimation procedure. But in the second one he stitched his wife together with a lot of different reanimated bodyparts of other people - as far as I remember. The title was: the bride of reanimator.
 
  07 July 2012
As mentioned earlier--the novelty of Human Centipede wasnt body stitching but WHERE and WHAT was stitched. Its faint praise in originality but it did draw attention to itself.

I read that in the second one the guy lures one victim by saying they would get to meet Quentin Tarantino.
 
  07 July 2012
See this is exactly why Creativity is Relative.

I don't like "The Human Centipede"..... That's another type of film that maybe is "too deep" or something.. Or maybe it's too shallow....

I can't get a "charge" out of it.

I'd rather see "War Horse" (and praise that for creativity).
__________________
"Your most creative work is pre-production, once the film is in production, demands on time force you to produce rather than create."
My ArtStation
 
  07 July 2012
You know, I find Spielberg's movies to get less interesting over time. I hardly pay attention to anything he makes these days. He reflects the attitude where fantasy or fx movies are meant to be dumb, while "serious" movies are slice of life.
He pretty much gave up on his summer movies after winning an oscar -not unless it had Kubrick or Phillip K Dick or HG Wells involved to add respectability.

I think less of a movie like Raiders these days (which I was a huge huge fan of back in the 80s) and more of something like Dragonslayer which I hardly paid attention to at the time--Interestingly, Mathew Robbins, the director and co-writer of Dragonslayer, also co-wrote Close Encounters and was the writer of that recently shelved Lovecraft movie for Guillermo Del Toro. The other writer of Dragonslayer went into video games.
 
  07 July 2012
Dragonslayer is one of the hidden gem of fantasy films in the 80's. The other one in my humble opinion is the Never Ending Story.

Dragonslayer could be used a a template for lowbudget filmmakers on how to do a suspenseful monster flick.

Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: See this is exactly why Creativity is Relative.

I don't like "The Human Centipede"..... That's another type of film that maybe is "too deep" or something.. Or maybe it's too shallow....

.

Shallow. Definitely kiddie pool material. Watching another human being tortured to dead is not high art, it is debasing, and it gives a bad name to horror.
I love the term "Torure Porn" since it clearly describes what is going on these flicks.
Give me a real horror flick, like Halloween, the Omen, The Exorcist, The Ring The Shinning, over that over produced crap.
__________________
LW FREE MODELS:FOR REAL Home Anatomy Thread
FXWARS
:Daily Sketch Forum:HCR Modeling
This message does not reflect the opinions of the US Government


Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 07 July 2012 at 02:47 AM.
 
  07 July 2012
Originally Posted by kelgy: You know, I find Spielberg's movies to get less interesting over time. I hardly pay attention to anything he makes these days. He reflects the attitude where fantasy or fx movies are meant to be dumb, while "serious" movies are slice of life.
He pretty much gave up on his summer movies after winning an oscar -not unless it had Kubrick or Phillip K Dick or HG Wells involved to add respectability.

I think less of a movie like Raiders these days (which I was a huge huge fan of back in the 80s) and more of something like Dragonslayer which I hardly paid attention to at the time--Interestingly, Mathew Robbins, the director and co-writer of Dragonslayer, also co-wrote Close Encounters and was the writer of that recently shelved Lovecraft movie for Guillermo Del Toro. The other writer of Dragonslayer went into video games.


I understand what you're saying. But I think Spielberg is just very good at finding a wavelength that represents a certain Greatest Common Denominator of Relatable Human Experience.

Whether it's "discovering Paternal instinct" like in Jurassic Park, or the parallels between having imaginary friends or friends from another world, or finding a sense of wonderment in something, while being lonely in ordinary life like in "E.T.".

It's not terribly deep.. But it's "basic" and "relatable" (apparently to a large number of people). And to be honest, I prefer them that way. I think people want to go to the movies to have a good time. And I think mostly, Spielberg's work is a happy medium. I cannot deny others emulating in his style have since produced drivel. But at the core of Spielberg's work is always a "relatable element". Although he can't please everyone. He can please a lot of them. And that's the reason.

The other thing remarkable is his framing, sense of color, shot arrangements for elements.
__________________
"Your most creative work is pre-production, once the film is in production, demands on time force you to produce rather than create."
My ArtStation
 
  07 July 2012
Personally I don't think horror films should be FX extravaganzas. I think I remember the director of The Grudge talking about this. CG and special FX in horror just doesn't scare. A ghost can be a real human with a slight double exposure to fade them into the background. Overdone CG FX, though, simply aren't scary. They're cool. Horror shouldn't be cool.

As for Dragonslayer, I really don't think it would make it with todays audiences. It would have a better chance being done as a fantasy TV series. I think we mentioned before how TV series are doing on a weekly basis what 80's and some 90's blockbusters were doing. Today's cinematic audience wouldn't accept Dragonslayer, and while it would be a huge improvement for SyFy type movies, considering their budgets, they are, unfortunately, trying to follow in the footsteps of todays blockbusters, which is why they often bite off more than they can chew.
__________________
Terrence Walker
Studio ArtFX
Learn How to Make Your Own Animated Projects!
You don't need millions of dollars or major studio backing!!
 
  07 July 2012
Thread automatically closed

This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.
__________________
CGTalk Policy/Legalities
Note that as CGTalk Members, you agree to the terms and conditions of using this website.
 
Thread Closed share thread



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright 2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.