CGTalk > Technical > Technical and Hardware
Login register
reply share thread « Previous Thread | Next Thread »  
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-12-2014, 09:30 PM   #1
chasecanade
Frequenter
portfolio
chase canadé
USA
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 129
Question Does this cpu/chipset combo have hyper threading or not?

Hey all,

I just picked up another comp today - it's a Dell XPS 400
I don't know why I bought it... I just did.
I take that back - I'm jonesing for a computer since mine went down - so I bought it.
I spent a whapping $40 bucks on it which may or may not be wasted money.

At any rate, I was told it had Hyper-threading but in looking it up. I am now questioning whether it does or not.

Dell states in the owners manual.

The processor is a Intel ® Pentium ® 4 Socket-T with Hyper-Threading technology

And the Chipset is a Intel 945P

System clock at 800- or 1066-MHz data rate (depending on your processor)

The processor shows as a 2.8ghz duo core according to Win7 system properties.
Which would be an 800mhz FSB.

Okay optional CPU upgrade to a 3.6 from what I'm reading and if overclocked many have shown rates over 4ghz - okay not bad.

But... I looked up the chipset and Intel states the 945 does not support Hyper-Threading.

Quote:
And Wiki they stated this:

Petium D Smithfield: All Smithfield processors were made of two 90 nm Prescott cores, next to each other on a single die with 1 MB of Level 2 (L2) cache per core. Hyper-threading was disabled in all Pentium D 8xx-series Smithfields with the exception of the Pentium Extreme Edition 840. Smithfield did not support Intel VT-x—Intel's x86 virtualization (formerly Vanderpool).


Quote:
And on the Smithfield XE (Pentium Extreme Edition)

Using a Pentium Extreme Edition branded CPU with an Intel 945-series chipset will disable Hyper-threading effectively turning the processor into a Pentium D branded equivalent


Now I'm a tad confused. Why would they pair a chipset that doesn't support Hyper-threading with a CPU that does and say it has hyper-threading? ( I skipped over this gen of comps so I haven't a clue what they were doing or claiming or saying)

Does this mean - I have hyper-threading or not with the 945P chipset and the Intel Pentium 4 Socket-T 2.8ghz CPU combo?

And one other thing - it also stated at Wiki that the Pentium D was a Duo core x86 processor - This would mean this is a duo core 32 bit system? I ask because it is showing two cores and is currently running the Win7 x64 OS. It is 64bit correct?

I thought all duo core systems ran x64bit. Am I wrong?

I can't check anything on it as when I bought it I told him he could keep the memory (3x512 sticks which I'd end up tossing anyway) But I'll pick up some memory for it this weekend.

tia,
- chase -
 
Old 04-12-2014, 11:41 PM   #2
chasecanade
Frequenter
portfolio
chase canadé
USA
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 129
Perhaps this is a better way to ask this question or rather confirm what I think after some further research on this.

If the 945P chipset was hyper-thread capable with the current CPU - I would see 4 cores under the processors as opposed to just 2 since it is a Duo Core in the Divice Manager under Win7 - correct?

If enabled that is in the Bios. Which I take it by default it would be enabled.

Before pulling the memory he had in it - in Device manager it only showed 2 cores with the three sticks of 512ram DDR2 he had in it.

So given this - this would mean this comp is not Hyper-threaded - correct?

And I don't mean to be stupid about this.. I really am not familiar with DDR2 or Pentium D or the 945P chipset and really hope someone that is can confirm or deny this for me.

I'd rather find out now before buying ram for it.
If it isn't hyper-thread capable - I'm not going to waste any more money on it.

tia
- chase -
 
Old 04-13-2014, 11:53 AM   #3
imashination
Expert
 
imashination's Avatar
portfolio
Matthew ONeill
3D Fluff
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 8,827
No idea, but keep in mind, hyper threading doesnt make your 2 core computer as fast as a 4 core one. At best its 20% extra speed, on average its closer to 10% and for many apps it will give zero benefit.

ie. I wouldnt be basing whether to upgrade and keep a computer based on whether or not it has hyperthreading.
__________________
Matthew O'Neill
www.3dfluff.com
 
Old 04-13-2014, 04:37 PM   #4
chasecanade
Frequenter
portfolio
chase canadé
USA
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by imashination
No idea, but keep in mind, hyper threading doesnt make your 2 core computer as fast as a 4 core one. At best its 20% extra speed, on average its closer to 10% and for many apps it will give zero benefit.

ie. I wouldnt be basing whether to upgrade and keep a computer based on whether or not it has hyperthreading.


Thankx for the reply imashination,

This was just to be a temporary comp to tie me over for a few weeks. Being with out a comp is killing me inside and out. lol

I did find out some more about it. Apparently Dell, like HP completely miss-represented their product capabilities.

They put either a single core with hyper-threading or a Duo Core.
With either one - this system is not 64 ready in the least. Let alone hyper-thread capable due to the 945 chipset.

It's kinda like saying you have a car that can do 150mph in second gear but they fail to tell you that it has a chip imbedded that no matter what - it will never get out of first gear. Or be able to put it into 4 wheel drive as claimed it was capable of.

I know I'm not alone at being really sick and tired of the electronics companies, especially computer and monitor manufacturers miss-representing their hardware's capabilities.

And the reviews that claim this gear is all that and may include benchmarks but completely lack telling you - they are lying about what it can and can't do to the limitations of a given hardware component imbedded in the motherboard or whatever.

Unbelievable this was a $4,000 system - and they blatantly lied miss-represented it's capabilities.

And to make matters worse - the guy selling it - as nice as he came off, expounded and exaggerated the bs.

I know this seems to be the norm - especially here in S. Florida, but I always get bit in the butt when buying since I'm apparently to a fault, too damn trusting, especially when I don't know for sure, that I'm being given information by someone professing and coming off as to knowing the facts about the product.

At least I didn't blow a ton of money on this comp. But $40 bucks is $40 bucks and would have been better spent else where.
Live and learn - once again

sigh another junker comp, as far as what I need it for, to get rid of.

Man I totally suck...
Or probably more accurately - I'm great at getting burned by all the bs, just too damn much of it being told for me to see clearly through all of it I guess. lol

- chase -

Last edited by chasecanade : 04-13-2014 at 04:46 PM.
 
Old 04-14-2014, 08:54 AM   #5
imashination
Expert
 
imashination's Avatar
portfolio
Matthew ONeill
3D Fluff
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 8,827
I guess its worth $40 as a very short term replacement til you get something else, but that machine was never worth $4000, probably not even $1000. The newish Pentium chips are just rebadged super budget chips for ultra low end machines, I mean it had half gig sticks of memory in it for crying out loud.
__________________
Matthew O'Neill
www.3dfluff.com
 
Old 04-14-2014, 09:40 PM   #6
olson
Houdini|Python|Linux
portfolio
Luke Olson
Dallas, USA
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by chasecanade
They put either a single core with hyper-threading or a Duo Core.
With either one - this system is not 64 ready in the least. Let alone hyper-thread capable due to the 945 chipset.


Hyper-Threading is a feature of the processor. The chipset doesn't have anything to do with it. Also the processor in the Dell XPS 400 is 64-bit, at least according to the reviews I found.

http://ark.intel.com/products/27512...ghz-800-mhz-fsb

Quote:
Originally Posted by chasecanade
Unbelievable this was a $4,000 system - and they blatantly lied miss-represented it's capabilities.


It was a roughly $1,000 machine when new 8 years ago. If everything on it works then $40 isn't all that bad.
__________________
http://www.whenpicsfly.com
 
Old 04-15-2014, 08:05 AM   #7
imashination
Expert
 
imashination's Avatar
portfolio
Matthew ONeill
3D Fluff
United Kingdom
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 8,827
Quote:
Originally Posted by olson
Hyper-Threading is a feature of the processor. The chipset doesn't have anything to do with it.


But keep in mind, the motherboard/bios has to support it. Ive come across machines before where HT is permanently disabled in the bios, always with the big vendors trying to lock off extra features you can pay for.
__________________
Matthew O'Neill
www.3dfluff.com
 
Old 04-15-2014, 03:45 PM   #8
chasecanade
Frequenter
portfolio
chase canadé
USA
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by olson
Hyper-Threading is a feature of the processor. The chipset doesn't have anything to do with it.


The cpu may have hyperthreading but if the chipset does not have this capability then no matter what the cpu wants to do - the chipset can't interface those demands.

Everything I understand about the chipset is it is the interface between all aspects of the computer - if the cpu wants to send info to the sound card - the gpu - the memory etc etc, it interfaces with the chipset.

If you look at wiki - it even states that because the 945 chipset was not hyperthread capable - the Pentium D extreme edition which had hyperthreading - it would null hyper threading out and basically turn it into a plain old Pentium D.

Quote:
Originally Posted by olsen
Also the processor in the Dell XPS 400 is 64-bit, at least according to the reviews I found.

http://ark.intel.com/products/27512...ghz-800-mhz-fsb


Dell never came out with 64bit drivers for it - which states a lot. Secondly - it shipped with two different CPU I have since found out.
A Pentium 4 Socket T single core or a Pentium D Duo Core.

The duo core obviously was 64bit capable - but with out 64bit drivers - big deal on what it's capable of. 64bit was never supported by Dell on this machine. Which is just like HP with the HP a1483 4200 x2 x64 - 64bit was never supported by HP though it was very much capable.

A major complaint by most that own branded machines as well as just about every other machine they put out. They don't upgrade or support drivers that meet the claims of what the machine is capable of let alone what the MB or CPU's are capable of or drivers for updated OS's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by olsen
It was a roughly $1,000 machine when new 8 years ago. If everything on it works then $40 isn't all that bad.


There again I would assume it depended on which cpu was in it as well as other factors.

PC Mag stated - "Sep 28, 2005 - Dell's XPS 400 ($2,799 direct, $2,399 without monitor, E-Value code: 6V411-X400PC) occupies the middle range of the new XPS line of luxury computers."

They shipped with up to a 3.6ghz cpu and the first one I review I ran across stated an asking price of $3,999.


The one I got had no memory - and he put the wrong sata cable in it connected to the HD. For the HD placement he had ( bottom) those two slots require a 90 degree sata end. hence when he closed the side panel - it snapped off the data connection on the HD. Which I didn't discover till I got it home. It apparently had stayed connected while he powered it up. I've since repaired that drive an it should hold but I still need the proper cable if I'm going to run it.

Secondly - something else I didn't see was on the front panel - one of the USB ports was missing the plastic inside it - apprenently someone snapped off a usb or something - I take it when they tried to dig out the end they snapped off the internal parts to the usb connecter.

Doesn't matter - I'm junking it. I thought from what he stated that it was a duo-core with hyperthreading and since it was a LGA775 socket it could be upgraded to a quad core. But that apparently has been tried. One stated he was successful but many other stated it couldn't be done due to voltage requirements couldn't be met.

Again - doesn't matter.

One thing I will say about though - the layout inside is really nice. Everything was nice - neat. built-in tie downs for all the cabling. Power Supply cables all had a place and were made to fit the case and where each HD and additional parts went.

Additional built in places to tie down and loom all cables including sata cables - optional card reader cables etc etc. It was as far as that goes - very well planed out.

There is even a top support for the PCI cards and oversized fans for the CPU heat sink which is the largest I've seen for stock branded PC so far. The thing is a monster heat sink and the fan is perfect for it and placement direct with direct direction for blowing through the fins.

I've seen after market cases that are crap by comparison. Other than that - I'm disappointed. But... it's typical it seems for the electronics industry to - lie.

I've said it before - its' obvious they are just dying to be regulated. Though I think most laws already cover miss-representation of a product. I guess they want to feel special and have special laws or regulations made just for them.

It's a US thing - something I can't understand.

Anyway - back to the drawing board. And a trip to the computer recycler... lol
 
reply share thread


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
CGSociety
Society of Digital Artists
www.cgsociety.org

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2006,
Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Minimize Ads
Forum Jump
Miscellaneous

All times are GMT. The time now is 03:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.