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Old 04-19-2010, 03:41 PM   #16
RobertJ3DCG
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Robert J Zamber
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Your willingness to hone and develop those traditional skills is a solid approach imo... as it goes a long way. Technology and such will change, those fundamental Art and Design principles will not. My 2....


Good Luck
 
Old 04-20-2010, 04:28 PM   #17
Jo3ism
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Originally Posted by leigh
Every single one of the best modellers I know are good at drawing, and I don't think that's a coincidence. Quite a lot of studios these days are asking to see traditional work alongside reels for certain positions as well, because now that schools are churning out button pushers by the bucket-load, studios refer to artistic skills to separate those button pushers from those with more rounded and expanded skill sets. I certainly wouldn't go so far as to say it's compulsory or absolutely necessary to have traditional skills, but it's certainly beneficial. Drawing is a really great way to learn anatomy and it teaches you to study your references carefully and improves your ability to recreate what you see accurately.


Hi, leigh... thanks for your comments. I agree with you with everything you've said. I took a drawing class, last summer, and they covered a lot about anatomy. I believe it is very beneficial because animators mostly animate human beings. And I just don't want to be a button pusher, I want to be much more than that.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 04:33 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoctorMonkeyFist
I think that traditional art is much less important to an animator than a modeler. You can understand animation arcs and bounce and stretch more easily in 3d. But I think that if you do traditional animation you'll have a much greater appreciation for 3d and not having to draw every frame.


Thanks for the comments DoctorMoneyFist... and great name btw... Yeah, you know, I'm the type that... if I'm going to spend so much time on something, especially this being my new career path, I want to learn/know it all. So, if learning every aspect of traditional art will not only benefit my skill sets in animation, but also give me a much greater appreciation for 3d... then I'm all for it.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 04:56 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by distastee
Companies constantly ask to see traditional work in our reels. They absolutely LOVE to see "traditional" work because it shows off your artistic eye outside the crutch of the computer. Whether it's worth it to spend the time going to school for that is more of a question about you and your abilities. If you have decent skills already and just need to develop them some more to get to the level of a demo reel - I would say draw all the time everywhere and you will just naturally reach that point. If you have a severe lacking of understanding of composition, form, and movement then maybe it's worth your while.

I agree with what was said earlier about drawing - it's not absolutely necessary to get a job. However, to get a job at a really great studio it requires some level of artistic ability. Even for animation - you have to understand composition and what looks good in frame in addition to fluidity of motion.


Wow... first, i want to thank you for this very indepth response to my post. You've covered a lot of my personal questions and concerns going into this.

Thank you for sharing the valuable information you received from recruiters. Last summer, I got a chance to compare my drawing skills to other art students, and when I think about it now, I don't think I'm as bad as I once thought. I think with enough practice, I'll eventually become really good at it... at least proficient enough to do quality animation work.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 05:02 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by distastee
The one caveat to all of this is - you have to be absolutely sure it's animation you want to do. While learning rigging will help with modeling and shading helps with lighting....animation has no cross pollination with another field. For the studios you listed - getting an animation job is all about showing you can animate. They could care less if you're are the best lighter, shader, & rendering TD in the world all rolled up into one little package - if you can't animate you're not going to be an animator. Likewise - being able to animate doesn't help you in any other fields (except maybe rigging since you can make slick animations for your rigs). So once you choose the path of animation you're pretty much glued to it. For smaller studios being able to do multiple things is a plus, but for larger studios you get pretty much shoved into your specialization. I've heard rumblings over the past few months that studios are starting to look for generalist skillsets a bit more, but it's not currently a major movement (and not a given that the trend will continue). It's safe to assume that learning animation and switching later is a fairly big waste of time (and money!).

I do want to stress again that I'm talking about bigger studios (Pixar, Dreamworks, ILM, Blue Sky, EA, etc.). Smaller studios are a completely different story.


You make a very good point on this... I'm a person that likes to have options. I don't plan on doing AM right away, maybe a year from now. I'm going to continue to self teach myself Maya, and definitly take the drawing courses effective this Summer. Hopefully, throughout this adventure, I'm going to find my niche, but for now, I'm pretty much set on animating. However, I'm keeping a very open mind on CG, and things can always change.
 
Old 04-20-2010, 05:07 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by distastee
As for Japan - I would say that's probably a major distraction. CG is a timesink - you tweak and tweak and tweak some more. Then when you think it's done and you come back 2 days later you hose the whole thing and do it again. It's about details, time, and hard work. The best thing about where I go to school is it's SO INCREDIBLY BORING here so I have the extra time to pour into my work. If you go to Japan - look at it realistically and realize that something will suffer. You'll be choosing between traveling the country, doing your job, and working on your projects. I doubt you can do all 3 to the fullest extent that you want. Added to that - you've chosen the specialization that is probably the hardest to break in to. Everyone want's to be an animator, so you really need to focus on developing your demo reel to be the best thing they've seen that day. I would save the trip to Japan for when you can truly enjoy it - in between productions when you don't want to be anywhere near a computer!

In any case - I wish you luck and hope you make the right decisions towards having a bright and happy future. Hope to see you out west someday man.


Yeah, the whole Japan thing is a bad idea. I need to stay focused on my career, and the pleasures will come later. I only wish the same for you - and everyone - in having a bright and happy future... and you never know.. maybe our paths will cross someday. We might be working on a project or something
 
Old 04-20-2010, 05:07 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by RobertJ3DCG
Your willingness to hone and develop those traditional skills is a solid approach imo... as it goes a long way. Technology and such will change, those fundamental Art and Design principles will not. My 2....


Good Luck


Excellent point... technology changes everyday... but not the art. Thanks!
 
Old 04-20-2010, 07:12 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo3ism
Wow... first, i want to thank you for this very indepth response to my post. You've covered a lot of my personal questions and concerns going into this.

Thank you for sharing the valuable information you received from recruiters. Last summer, I got a chance to compare my drawing skills to other art students, and when I think about it now, I don't think I'm as bad as I once thought. I think with enough practice, I'll eventually become really good at it... at least proficient enough to do quality animation work.


No problem. Best of luck!
 
Old 04-20-2010, 07:12 PM   #24
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