Is a degree worth it? University. What do you think??

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Old 10 October 2012   #16
Originally Posted by mr Bob: You seem to be forgetting comping has maths at its core as does doing anything in 3d. As I have pointed out already if you want to earn the better pay rates and be the first to get hired and the last to be let go, go for a technical degree.
If that's not you, you do not have to go that path, but having a technical degree behind you will be more valuable than any vfx degree should things not work out for you in the industry. At least then you will have an in demand degree and something to fall back on.

b


What exactly do you mean by technical degree? Wouldn't it be better to have some art-related degree in the background?
 
Old 10 October 2012   #17
Aren't you responding him Mr Bob?

Well.. anyway.. thanks for the replies... if anyone has anything else to say please do! Appreciate it.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #18
Maybe this isn't the right place, but has anyone finished a university in Germany that you would recommend to me ? If any, please do share your experience.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #19
Not really different from what other said but I'll add my input

- a degree is not a "must have" in this industry but definitly makes life easier when it comes to working abroad. at least, less difficult and more choices.

- a more generic degree in art or technology (depending on your skills and taste) seems more interesting to me than pure CG, especially if you are strong in learning softwares by yourself.

- time in schools brings other things, if the school and teachers are good : future professional contacts, learning new ways of doing and exchange with both like- and different-minded people. Also, you'll get to deal with people who're going to tell you that your stuff isn't so good : you'll receive critics, lots of them, and will learn how to cope with them. This essential in this industry.

- and it's time that you can usee easily to get better at anything you are interested in. You'll start in the industry with much better skills and it will be a much better start.


of course it has to be balanced with the price of studies. In Europe you may find not expensive cursus.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #20
Quote: a degree is not a "must have" in this industry but definitly makes life easier when it comes to working abroad


i agree with above, if plan to working locally at yur own country, dun woryr so much a degree or diploma, learn properly and produce a reel dpends on your focus, unless you want to work oversea or move overseas to work, degree is needed only for immigration to get work visa, when I wanted to apply for work visa i have to submit my so called diploma to apply for it
 
Old 11 November 2012   #21
I've decided to go in Germany and study, does anyone know or has studied in the Academy of Media Arts in Cologne?

It seems that they teach pretty well and I really like the student's projects on youtube.

I was wondering if it's hard to get the student visa for Germany. I found some information here http://www.mawista.com/blog/en/sche...sa-information/

But can anyone confirm if this is correct and up to date?

Also any tips from personal experience would be very highly appreciated.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #22
Must the degree needed to work overseas related to art or any kind of degree would do it?
 
Old 11 November 2012   #23
Here is a different perspective

Here is a post that I did several years ago. It presents a different perspective. I think it is still applicable today:
degree is very worthwhile.....
I see alot of folks noting that a degree isn't necessary for an animation position. Since, I am not in animation, I accept what everyone said about this. BUT!!! Let me present a different point of view.

There are some very good reasons to get a degree among which are:

1. As Leigh noted, in foreign countries, it might be necessary to get a job there.

2. More importantly, it opens up many doors that might not be available otherwise: I have found that folks never know where their life will take them or what changes will ocurr in their life. What happens if suddenly studios start wanting degrees or want those with degrees and experience for higher level positions?
This has certainly been the case for other professions and can certainly start happening here too.

More to the point, what happens if you want to leave the field of computer graphics? This could happen due to outsourcing, problems with the industry ,or simply changed objectives by you. Having a degree opens up more options.

I know someone who switched from animation to eventually going to law school and specializing in intellectual property law. Having a degree will open up other doors.

Also, if a school has a stringent admission policy, you will learn from other top students as well. Top schools also tend to attract top faculty. Lets face it: faculty would prefer to teach the better kids.

Also, I would bet that top faculty have a lot of industry connections. If you go to a good school and do well, it is common for faculty to recommend students to employers and for employers to ask top faculty for recommendations. This happens all the time in many fields of endeavor.

Personally, I STRONGLY recommend that you get a degree. Now once you have one, you don't need a second degree unless you want to teach. You can attend a trade school to get the skills needed such as Gnomon or Animation Mentor or even study books or take online programs for the skills. However, having a degree can't hurt you. It can only help!

With all this said, you still will need a strong demo ( which should occur if you work your butt off at a good school) and would need decent interviewing skills.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #24
Originally Posted by taxguy: Here is a post that I did several years ago. It presents a different perspective. I think it is still applicable today:
degree is very worthwhile.....
I see alot of folks noting that a degree isn't necessary for an animation position. Since, I am not in animation, I accept what everyone said about this. BUT!!! Let me present a different point of view.

There are some very good reasons to get a degree among which are:

1. As Leigh noted, in foreign countries, it might be necessary to get a job there.

2. More importantly, it opens up many doors that might not be available otherwise: I have found that folks never know where their life will take them or what changes will ocurr in their life. What happens if suddenly studios start wanting degrees or want those with degrees and experience for higher level positions?
This has certainly been the case for other professions and can certainly start happening here too.

More to the point, what happens if you want to leave the field of computer graphics? This could happen due to outsourcing, problems with the industry ,or simply changed objectives by you. Having a degree opens up more options.

I know someone who switched from animation to eventually going to law school and specializing in intellectual property law. Having a degree will open up other doors.

Also, if a school has a stringent admission policy, you will learn from other top students as well. Top schools also tend to attract top faculty. Lets face it: faculty would prefer to teach the better kids.

Also, I would bet that top faculty have a lot of industry connections. If you go to a good school and do well, it is common for faculty to recommend students to employers and for employers to ask top faculty for recommendations. This happens all the time in many fields of endeavor.

Personally, I STRONGLY recommend that you get a degree. Now once you have one, you don't need a second degree unless you want to teach. You can attend a trade school to get the skills needed such as Gnomon or Animation Mentor or even study books or take online programs for the skills. However, having a degree can't hurt you. It can only help!

With all this said, you still will need a strong demo ( which should occur if you work your butt off at a good school) and would need decent interviewing skills.


Hey thanks a lot man! You're probably right, and a degree never hurt anyone, it's just that studying is not that cheap anymore these days. Maybe having a degree in law, psychology or something different from our profession could be a great back up plan in case you fail but IMO that thought alone sets the path to never have success in animation or VFX.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #25
After getting a degree in something I'm not interested in, and not using it at my current position. I have come up with a line that sums it all up in my view.

Get a degree for yourself.

no one else; not your parents, not your future employer, not anyone but yourself. If you don't want a degree don't get one, learn it on your own or on the job. Don't get one that your not passionate about, cause I can tell you it's a waste of time. If you feel you need one then get one. It's that simple the information is all out there and one way of learning is not the best way nor better than any other way as long as you keep learning.

The only legitimate time to get a degree for a job is when you feel you will be held back because you do not have a degree. Plan ahead though, don't get the experience and then at the last minute decide you need a degree. Get the degree while gaining experience so that when the opportunity comes you are ready.

There is no easy path for a career, only jobs; and In-and-Out is hiring.
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Last edited by h3llbl4z3r : 11 November 2012 at 09:58 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #26
In Europe, generally speaking ,after the Bologna treaty, Univ. degrees became self-learning oriented and you're more taught to go search for knowledge yourself, so in a certain way it can become like home learning with tutoring in certain courses. I think it is useful for getting some essential foundations on certain areas like fine arts, sciences, architecture, etc depending on what CG area you really want to pursue. Also don't forget that a broad general knowledge is also very useful in whatever area you are. At the same time you can refine your options and start to find the area you really want and specialize in it by taking some courses and learn as much as you can about it. That's one way.

The other way seems to be to jumping directly to a CG school, but i'd only suggest to do that after knowing for sure what path you want, since its a very directed and specialized learning (not to mention costly ) and i think although they always give some introductory teaching to the basics of composition, color theory etc, it wont ever be the same as having experienced it as a hobby or in college doing some photography work assignments or shooting your own movies, i.e.

So in sum, college is indeed useful to build your path on it, but if you have your mind set there are lots of CG masters who knew exactly what they wanted and succeeded without it, learning only their craft by themselves or at courses. Good luck
 
Old 11 November 2012   #27
Thanks to both of you!

Really helped!

Last edited by DaPerPT : 11 November 2012 at 11:48 PM.
 
Old 11 November 2012   #28
Quote: What exactly do you mean by technical degree? Wouldn't it be better to have some art-related degree in the background?


Computer science,engineering degree's etc. A course that has maths, physics, computer language etc. Art related > Not if you want to be the guy who makes the tools everyone else pushes.
 
Old 12 December 2012   #29
Quote: Get a degree for yourself. no one else; not your parents, not your future employer, not anyone but yourself. If you don't want a degree don't get one, learn it on your own or on the job. Don't get one that your not passionate about, cause I can tell you it's a waste of time. If you feel you need one then get one


agree, it's also about your own choice, won't matter wat others will tell you sometimes
 
Old 12 December 2012   #30
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