300 dpi problem in maya

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  07 July 2017
300 dpi problem in maya

Hi

i have a client woh wants a 3000x3000 *and 300 dpi render.
and i m using maya 2014 and vray but the problem i am facing is that when i render in mental ray it shows the option for dpi but in vray setting its not showing anything related to dpi.
i have tried some help from internet but according to thier calculation i need to render my frame 12500x12500 resolution to get 300dpi and then changed it in photoshop....Is this the only solution? coz my system is giving fatal error and is not able to render 12500x12500.

Please help me...how to render 300dpi in vray maya..

Regards
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  07 July 2017
dpi are irrelevant for rendering... its just for print...
but yes you would need to render a 12k image...


or rendered in tiles with deadline jigsaw for example..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQEO6EUDDf0

butmost images that big are upscaled with special software...
https://www.on1.com/products/resize10/?ind
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  07 July 2017
Your calculation is a little off. 3000x3000 pixels, in any DPI, is the same. DPI is only a factor when you consider real-world size, say a picture that's 50x50 inches.
An image like that would be 3600x3600 pixels in screen pixel resolution (the norm being about 72 DPI), while it would be 15000x15000 in 300 DPI for print.

If your client asked you for a 3000x3000 render in 300 DPI, the resulting image would be 10x10 inches when printed.
You should probably make sure with your client what the final size that the image should be printed in is, and then determine the correct render resolution.
 
  07 July 2017
...and with ( any reasonable ) rendering software you can divide your huge image in tiles.

read the manuals of your rendering software. please.

/Risto
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  08 August 2017
Pleaseyou following formula to get high resolution render output.
Pixels÷ DPI = Inches
by using this formula you will get the real world sizeof render with 75 dpi
 
  08 August 2017
Hmmm.... in Maya it is quite easy. In the renderglobals, set your units to inches or cm or whatever, then set your final output size and resolution. If you want to know the actual pixel resolution, set the size units to pixels.
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  08 August 2017
Originally Posted by praksly: Hi

i have a client woh wants a 3000x3000 *and 300 dpi render.
and i m using maya 2014 and vray but the problem i am facing is that when i render in mental ray it shows the option for dpi but in vray setting its not showing anything related to dpi.
i have tried some help from internet but according to thier calculation i need to render my frame 12500x12500 resolution to get 300dpi and then changed it in photoshop....Is this the only solution? coz my system is giving fatal error and is not able to render 12500x12500.

Please help me...how to render 300dpi in vray maya..

Regards

DPI is a term related to offset lithography. It means DOTS per Inch.

PPI is a term related to digital graphics. It means Pixels per Inch.

The following should explain this in more detail:

https://99designs.com/blog/tips/ppi...the-difference/

It's not clear that your client is asking for something to go to external print. If it isn't, DPI can be misleading and potentiallly incorrect. You have to know the total inches output to know how many  DPI to multiply that against to get your final resolution. If an output resolution in inchest has not been pro idea to you DPI is irrelevant.

Further, DPI is not equivalent to PPI, which is what it sounds like you are calculating for. It's a very common miscalculation. Most of the response so far has been to address DPI as if it is PPI, presumably. This is technically incorrect, because DPI assumes some negative space between dots to permit the white of the paper to bleed through. DPI is a mechanical print term, not a digital graphics term. But it gets used incorrectly far too frequently.

As has already been explained, total inches of res out x ppi = total pixel resolution.

If the product is not being printed to an external source neither ppi nor dpi are relevant unless you've been given an output extent in inches. Without that there is no way to make the calculation.

In regards to PPI vs DPI if someone tells you DPI just assume they mean PPI. A dot is not a pixel. 300 PPI is higher quality than 300 DPI by default and there is no direct translation from PPI to DPI because Dots are always variable in size (in relation to DPI negative space) while pixels are not. Pixels are always opaque and adjacent meaning no negative space. So by assuming DPI means PPI you are ensuring the highest quality possible.

A digital image to be printed to 8"x10" photo paper at 300 PPI will be 2400 pixels by 3000 pixels.
8in*300ppi=2400pixels
10in*300ppi=3000pixels

Without detail about the output in inches, PPI is irrelevant. Otherwise the client needs to tell you his maximum image resolution in pixels.

Generally ignore DPI or PPI setting in the rendering interface. Calculate the resolution manually and punch that in as explicit values X by Y. Just make sure that your camera pixel aspect is set to 1.0 aspect so that the pixels all come out as square pixels.

Joey
 
  08 August 2017
render as 3000x3000 and in photoshop, uncheck resample in the image size window, change to 300 ppi, send to client

it's not a maya problem
 
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