First Cyberpunkt 2077 Trailer (CD Project Dev of The Witcher Series)

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Old 01 January 2013   #16
http://www. cg meetup .net/home/making-of-cyberpunk-2077-by-platige-images/

Very interesting that they used a 3D scanner (or equivalent) for the characters. Considering the final doesn't really look 'photo real', I have to wonder why they went with a more styalised approach when they had the means to make something...well.. photo real. And if they weren't going photo real, why they used 3D scans?

Still a very interesting way of going about it! And a cool trailer to boot.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #17
Originally Posted by Pyke: http://www. cg meetup .net/home/making-of-cyberpunk-2077-by-platige-images/

Very interesting that they used a 3D scanner (or equivalent) for the characters. Considering the final doesn't really look 'photo real', I have to wonder why they went with a more styalised approach when they had the means to make something...well.. photo real. And if they weren't going photo real, why they used 3D scans?

Still a very interesting way of going about it! And a cool trailer to boot.


It looks like the 3D scans and 3D modeling were used in a "patchwork" style method to make "statues".

They also seem to hint at a tight schedule. 3D scanning is the fastest way to get your realistic humans without bothering with modeling everything.
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Old 01 January 2013   #18
Originally Posted by CGIPadawan: They also seem to hint at a tight schedule. 3D scanning is the fastest way to get your realistic humans without bothering with modeling everything.


Not really, there's a lot of CG work involved with scanning as well, but you also have to go through many extra hoops - finding talent from an agency, paperwork, the actual scanning session, processing the data and so on. Only then are you at the point where a good Zbrush sculptor could get you in 2-5 days (depending on what you're scanning).
It's also quite a lot more expensive.

The up side is that you get real-life results, of course.
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Old 01 January 2013   #19
Originally Posted by Laa-Yosh: Not really, there's a lot of CG work involved with scanning as well, but you also have to go through many extra hoops - finding talent from an agency, paperwork, the actual scanning session, processing the data and so on. Only then are you at the point where a good Zbrush sculptor could get you in 2-5 days (depending on what you're scanning).
It's also quite a lot more expensive.

The up side is that you get real-life results, of course.


I don't have experience with the actual technology. But the task description reads to me like they only needed one model to kneel and another model to stand.

So you only needed time for one full scan... and then your modelers get to work. Where the scan can provide a good mesh... That's work done.. because they didn't even rig the characters.

That tells me the thing just went straight from asset creation to Rendering/Lighting/VFX since nothing is really moving in the pictures.

I could be wrong. But if that was the only goal... then doing 3D scan is faster than modeling assets...

On the prep work and modeling agencies required to get to the Z-Brush milestone... Just maybe their boss had a good rolodex for it.... Different teams have different advantages.
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Last edited by CGIPadawan : 01 January 2013 at 11:53 PM.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #20
Consider that Platige had to hire this model, who's as far as I know a polish playmate, then they had to fly her and probably one or two members of their crew to the UK, and they also had to handle contracts with a lawyer to avoid any later complications. Money starts to add up quickly
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Old 01 January 2013   #21
Originally Posted by Artbot: All of this had me baffled, too. But then I also asked myself, If she's obviously a cyborg, why is she (it?) wearing clothes? It's not like they are hiding the fact that she's (it's?) a cyborg.


Many people in this world have a baffling fear of breasts. Pretty sure that's the reason.

Cool trailer, Platige Image are consistently amazing.
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Old 01 January 2013   #22
Seemed like a great solution for the bodies on the ground, and there really was very little movement elsewhere. I would be curious to see how much they used directly vs. modified or remodeled.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #23
Originally Posted by Laa-Yosh: Consider that Platige had to hire this model, who's as far as I know a polish playmate, then they had to fly her and probably one or two members of their crew to the UK, and they also had to handle contracts with a lawyer to avoid any later complications. Money starts to add up quickly


To be honest, if I think we are of like mind... then we know that a skilled modeler can use just photos of said Polish Playmate and get a nearly identical 3D model result without 3D scanning within a fraction of a time of flying that playmate to a 3D scanner.

Which contributes to what you were saying. 3 days for a 3D modeler probably doesn't cost as much as a 3D scanner facility, a polish playmate, and another male model. I've heard of shams where project leaders intentionally lead projects down paths to hire playmates so that they can engage in "something else entirely" with said playmates (see: "The Making of Piranha"). But... I don't think this is one of those cases. lol. :P

But I'm just trying to understand the rationale of this method. The only thing I could think of was that maybe the time frame was THAT short. But for that to work would require the luck of having her already in the area when she was booked or something.

So you got me there. But I don't believe what was done here HAD to be done that way, except for speed...Which you are correct in pointing out that you do have speed but only after you get past all this prep work, etc.

So you got me.
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Old 01 January 2013   #24
All I'm saying is that it probably wasn't chosen because of a tight schedule.

One possible explanation is that scanning techniques are becoming cheaper and more readily available, compared to 10 or even 5 years ago when it was really expensive and thus a privilege of large movie VFX shops. So a lot of smaller studios might be getting interested in the workflow and chose to dedicate one or projects to explore the possibilities.

All the rest of the questions, like the costs, amount of organization work before the actual scanning session, amount of post clean-up work, quality of the results vs. quality of completely hand-crafted assets, can only be speculated about.
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Old 01 January 2013   #25
Originally Posted by Laa-Yosh: All I'm saying is that it probably wasn't chosen because of a tight schedule.

One possible explanation is that scanning techniques are becoming cheaper and more readily available, compared to 10 or even 5 years ago when it was really expensive and thus a privilege of large movie VFX shops. So a lot of smaller studios might be getting interested in the workflow and chose to dedicate one or projects to explore the possibilities.

All the rest of the questions, like the costs, amount of organization work before the actual scanning session, amount of post clean-up work, quality of the results vs. quality of completely hand-crafted assets, can only be speculated about.


Would you say though that this is short cut now to getting your base meshes for characters? Have actors in temp costumes in T-poses and you get your scan in and from there you have your fully realistic 3D model ready for rigging? Or are topologies not very good when done this way?
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Old 01 January 2013   #26
Er, scanning provides no base meshes, only high density irregular meshes. Someone still ahs to do retopo and reprojection to make it usable.
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Old 01 January 2013   #27
Originally Posted by PKosow: The style and architecture reminds me of Judge Dread.

"I am, the LAW!"


Not to mention the slo-mo bust in Dredd 3D...
 
Old 01 January 2013   #28
Yeah-My assumption wasn't that it was scanned because it was faster, or easier, but just because it was how they decided to do it.

I would imagine its the same amount of work to scan, retopo, prep, etc a scanned model, as it is to create one from scratch.
The disadvantage being that the company couldn't use any prebuilt base rigs for animation...

Perhaps the director wanted the control of posing an actual person on the set?
 
Old 01 January 2013   #29
Originally Posted by Laa-Yosh: Er, scanning provides no base meshes, only high density irregular meshes. Someone still ahs to do retopo and reprojection to make it usable.



Which is what I thought when I saw all the "squiggly mesh" images... That those couldn't be final.

So once again.. I'm stuck with "I have no idea why they felt this method was necessary". :(

I hate it when I don't understand the reasoning behind a method.
I always think I'm missing out on something clever if I don't understand the "super-tactic" behind choosing a strange method.

I mean.. not to dismiss or assume anything... but if this was a Digic gig... you guys would just MODEL it all right?

It's just one set of building facades, a street, and the interior of a Police vehicle....One cop.. a group of dupli-cops.. and one stock girl with cyborg scythe hands...

So.... why the 3D scan? Like someone pointed out.. it didn't really look super real because of it.
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Last edited by CGIPadawan : 01 January 2013 at 12:05 AM.
 
Old 01 January 2013   #30
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