WIP new character

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Old 02 February 2013   #16
Good idea. Now do you see what needs to change?
 
Old 02 February 2013   #17
Originally Posted by FarisB: Dude, you went all the way, 10/10. I don't think anyone can tell you now its off or spot on.

You are going to draw the face looking at the hand right?

So as I was saying, you should move on to the next stage now.

Let us know if you need anything.


I don't know yet where the face or more the eyes will be looking at. I will thinking about that. You mean for us his right hand or for him his right hand? Someone else finds that it still looks like we're viewing this stick figure from a higher viewpoint than your horizon line. What do you think about that?
 
Old 02 February 2013   #18
Usually if we can see the top of something it means it's below the horizon line (your eye height actually) and if you can see its bottom it means it's above the horizon line (higher viewpoint).

So what is creating the effect you are talking about is the fact the you're leaning forward meaning your spine and neck line is tilted forward making see more of the top.

I think you will see better if you improve the line quality of the drawing. Draw smoother continuous lines, varied in shape. Maybe draw a square using perspective around his feet to make the viwer feel the plane he is in. Make him more solid, not just a stick figure. Then take another look. As it is now the line quality is too crude to make a judgement.

It's ok to push forward a bit to see if its working or no.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #19
Hey

Here I got to the symplified muscles version of the pose. I also added a plane to ground him. His face is directed to the right under because that's the same direction as the right(for him left) leg is going too. His eyes(not visualised yet) are faces to the public. Sorry for the late update but I got busy with stuff outside this kind of work. I am going to add background elements to show his world of living(cityblocks and plants). Maybe also silhouettes of his enemies in the foreground(Hero is in midground then) but I am not sure of if that's necessaire. I add those elements in the next post.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/45b1e4024...olfheldpose.png

Last edited by Patsa53 : 03 March 2013 at 01:24 PM.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #20
Hey

Here are the best, out a bigger range, of tumbnails of my character with a background. Somewhere else I was recommended to show the character in the ultimate situation. Tumbnail 14 is for this, in my eyes, best suited. I find the other here shown tumbnails also interesting although they don't show my character in a ultimatum situation. What do you think I should do ?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/zunhwwjnu...0%2022%2039.jpg
 
Old 03 March 2013   #21
You need to work on your perspective. All the thumbnails look wrong because none of them have correct perspective, In your thumbnail sketches, you need to work out the layout of your scene and the proper perspective, as well as the most effective camera angle to convey the vibe you want for the visual narrative. Your sense of composition and camera angle is too utilitarian and not creative/interesting enough. This is a very common mistake that beginners make--they are often limited to only visualizing their scenes as if depicting a theater stage, and don't think about all the different possibilities such as interesting/dramatic camera angles and using variety of different focal lengths (such as ultra-wide angle, worm's eye view).

Take some time and learn the basics of perspective (learn how to depict at least one, two, and three point perspective)--it is a requirement if you want to depict credible looking environments, and absolutely necessary if you want to be able to depict different camera angles.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #22
Originally Posted by Patsa53: Hey

Here I got to the symplified muscles version of the pose. I also added a plane to ground him. His face is directed to the right under because that's the same direction as the right(for him left) leg is going too. His eyes(not visualised yet) are faces to the public. Sorry for the late update but I got busy with stuff outside this kind of work. I am going to add background elements to show his world of living(cityblocks and plants). Maybe also silhouettes of his enemies in the foreground(Hero is in midground then) but I am not sure of if that's necessaire. I add those elements in the next post.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/45b1e4024...olfheldpose.png


Okay, one thing you're consistently missing is the feet - the figure's center of weight is wrong, and is poised over the wrong foot. Do the pose yourself again, and pay attention to the direction of your feet, the position, and which leg and foot your weight is on. If you take another photo, include the feet!

It's something you haven't learned yet, but this can have a lot of influence on the body language of the figure - an aggressive pose requires an aggressive stance, and the feet play into that - you can create a sense of tension, or tranquility, just by what foot the figure is putting it's weight on. It's a lot like boxing, a boxer would understand what I'm saying immediately. (I've boxed as a workout off and on for years, I learned a lot from it). The weight of the figure should flow from one or both feet (depending on pose), up through the leg(s), through the hips, through the spine, to the head.

The feet you've drawn are also not putting the character onto the drawing plane correctly - the pose is standing, but the feet say floating. You can't have both.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #23
Hey

Thanks for the feedback. My tumbnails were all about the idea what was going on in the scène. It was about that that I wanted your opinion first. I forgot to include that in my last post(had to post fast because I had to go sleep). I know that the details(perspective, camera angle, details pose, ...) are not good enough yet but thanks for your advice about working it out. I will look into it.
 
Old 03 March 2013   #24
I agree that you need to take some time off and study perspective. It will help you a lot. Once you do let me know, i'll give you a few tips regarding organics in perspective, shortcuts and how to set up a good template/setup to work from to help build scenes quicker.

I'm going to put them again for you, regarding perspective in terms of resources my recommendations are:

- Gwen white: perspective a guide for artists, architects and designers.

- http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2016...5-h/20165-h.htm

- Norling: perspective made easy. ( I found Gwen White book to be better but this more well known and still a damn good book).

- Handprint website: Advanced. Leave it for after you learned the basics.
http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/tech10.html

You've been tenacious in this, really cool of you. I'm sure in time you will reach your target.
 
Old 04 April 2013   #25
Hey FarisB

Studiying something/perspective is one thing but applying it is another more difficult part. But I will go for it.
 
Old 04 April 2013   #26
Very true. Actually one of the conclusions I got after studying perspective was its limitations. This struck me as a path I didn't want to get too focused on when I read about an artist called Paolo Uccello.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paolo_Uccello

http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/perspect5.html
(search for his name, there are some comments from Giorgio Vasari that are an interesting read)

With perspective alone the figures will look stiff. Tilting and awkward angles or free angles and lines are very time consuming to compute angle and distance wise. Also due to the setup needed to draw in perspective you use a large space of the paper only to actually draw in a small portion of it which you then might need to magnify. steep angled vanishing points going beyond the limits of the paper. vertical vanishing points. The page gets too crowded with lines and can't "see" any more.

Each of these will need sitting down and finding a solution that is not written in a book, you will find alternative solutions than the academic method of doing it (after you hit your head on the wall for a few days).

But think about the benefits. You know how people draw a table then they want to draw a cup of tea on top it? And the cup of tea looks wrong? Same issue with the feet on the ground.

Lets make it simple, we need to draw a cube at a 30, 60 angles in relation to the ground line and a little bit to the left of our center of vision. How deep should we draw that line going to the 30 vanishing point and how much to the 60 vanishing point? If we can't draw a simple cube, non tilted, parallel to the ground plane, how are we going to draw a whole person with limbs and legs and torsos and head going in every direction?

It is up to you, but I don't think there is a way to "escape" from studying perspective. But drawing a figure inside a defined 3d space is much easier than drawing a figure on a blank piece of paper.

Last edited by FarisB : 04 April 2013 at 10:06 AM.
 
Old 04 April 2013   #27
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