My 3D Design College Sucks

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Old 04 April 2011   #16
yeah exactly, doesn't matter how you did it as long as it looks good and is correctly made.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #17
Originally Posted by Setha: yeah exactly, doesn't matter how you did it as long as it looks good and is correctly made.


The courses should be geared around creativity and making great use of every single program you can get your hands on. If I have all these great programs and plugins, realflow, fumefx, Vray, After FX, photoshop, why isnt there a fine line drawn for what's okay to use and what's not? In my class, we're allowed to use photoshop for materials but not mudbox for modeling, we're allowed to use Depth of Field in the effects parameters but not in the camera options. In one instance, there were specific instructions saying there was an option in weather or not we wanted to include models in our project. Going by the instructions, I decided not to include models, so I animated glowing blotches on a plane to disperse into black spheres. He later told me I needed to include a model in my project after I had already rendered the video out.

The class is just so disorganized, this is how my college treats me when I try to be creative.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #18
Like all customers you want personal coaching, in the software of your choice. These lessons are available for 100 bucks an hour. You don't want to pay that though do you? You don't have to.

Man up. The interwebs are bulging with free and excellent information and examples.
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Old 04 April 2011   #19
Originally Posted by Verinince: The courses should be geared around creativity and making great use of every single program you can get your hands on.


I disagree. That's a one way ticket to not really learning much at all, because you'd be spreading yourself too thin and therefore losing focus.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #20
Originally Posted by leigh: I disagree. That's a one way ticket to not really learning much at all, because you'd be spreading yourself too thin and therefore losing focus.


I couldn't disagree more. I use Photoshop, Illustrator, Maya, Modo, Mudbox, After Effects, Indesign, Flash, Unity and any other program I need to create the specific project and vision.

There is no such thing as spreading yourself too thin. It just depends on what kind of artist you want to be. If you want to be a painter, don't do anything but paint. But if you want to be a rounded artist (which in the 21st century involves a lot of digital equipment) learning new programs is like learning to sculpt, draw, photograph, use pastels, it's all knowledge building. To marry one program is to become a dinosaur.

I'm willing to hear another side, but that's kinda the way I feel about it, anyone else agree?
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Old 04 April 2011   #21
Originally Posted by leigh: I disagree. That's a one way ticket to not really learning much at all, because you'd be spreading yourself too thin and therefore losing focus.


Well, all people learn different ways. Many of the seniors in my classes stuck to the schools strict learning agenda and they're end results aren't so pleasing to look at. The seniors in my class may be able to model very well, but the way they present their work is just plain poor. I'm a renaissance man in 3DS Max, however I'm an expert at no particular field. It's just like drawing, you map the outline first, then you work your way in on the details. I've been working toward designing a CGI film and that's kept me motivated the entire way through. I explore 3DS Max, and I take note of everything I'll need to know for my film, that way I can always go back to it, redo the tutorials, and learn again whatever I missed. I find it very helpful.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #22
Originally Posted by plaidklaus: I couldn't disagree more. I use Photoshop, Illustrator, Maya, Modo, Mudbox, After Effects, Indesign, Flash, Unity and any other program I need to create the specific project and vision.

There is no such thing as spreading yourself too thin. It just depends on what kind of artist you want to be. If you want to be a painter, don't do anything but paint. But if you want to be a rounded artist (which in the 21st century involves a lot of digital equipment) learning new programs is like learning to sculpt, draw, photograph, use pastels, it's all knowledge building. To marry one program is to become a dinosaur.

I'm willing to hear another side, but that's kinda the way I feel about it, anyone else agree?


Yes, I agree. My school teaches us to learn the way they want us to learn. It's almost like a contradiction, how can there be limits on a project that expects you to be creative? College is geared toward doing what they want you to do for a degree. The assignments give you no room to express your creative side, they're setup so one can easily grade people's work. To ask a professor to grade on creativity would be asking too much.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #23
Originally Posted by Verinince: Yes, I agree. My school teaches us to learn the way they want us to learn. It's almost like a contradiction, how can there be limits on a project that expects you to be creative? College is geared toward doing what they want you to do for a degree. The assignments give you no room to express your creative side, they're setup so one can easily grade people's work. To ask a professor to grade on creativity would be asking too much.


Yeah man, that sounds like a trade school maybe?

So I went to a University before going to the Vancouver Film School and the two types of instruction are very different.

Trade schools teach you how to do a specific industry job (like be a modeler or be an animator) where as University makes you be a diverse student learning many different elements. At the end of the day, just pursue your passion with everything you have, believe in it and the path will unfold I promise.

I "thought" I would be a comic artist going into University to study graphic design. That led me to 3D where I went to VFS and then worked in the game industry, moved back home after 3 years in Vancouver and then started working in the web industry (using my University Graphic Design degree). Now I'm looking into developing web games, so I'm combining the two.

Just follow your passion, you'll be fine (just don't slack off, hehe).

keep up your hard work buddy, good luck.
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Old 04 April 2011   #24
Originally Posted by plaidklaus: I couldn't disagree more. I use Photoshop, Illustrator, Maya, Modo, Mudbox, After Effects, Indesign, Flash, Unity and any other program I need to create the specific project and vision.

There is no such thing as spreading yourself too thin.


Of course there's such a thing as spreading yourself too thin, and it's particularly counter productive in a learning environment. A school that tries to teach its students ten different applications at once would be doing those students a huge disservice. You don't learn the fundamentals of digital art by learning a gazillion programs, you learn the fundamentals by focusing on one app at a time, and mastering the basics of the art form itself, as opposed to trying to simultaneously learn a plethora of software packages that are absolutely going to make you lose focus. There is absolutely no way that a student could, for example, focus on mastering modelling if their instructor insists on simultaneously trying to make them learn a compositing app and an editing app, etc. That's how you end up with graduates who are basically shit at everything. Frankly I feel that over the course of a semester, students should only deal with two or three software packages, tops.

And to the original poster, I don't see the harm in an instructor insisting on students using only certain tools for assignments. Learning the intricacies of using the scanline renderer is going to be more beneficial for your technical understanding of lighting, shading and rendering in the long run than using premade VRay shaders. Ultimately, it's best to know both, but forcing you to use the scanline renderer only would be a very good technical exercise. You can't blame the scanline renderer for your poor quality image; it's a bad workman who blames his tools. If you'd spent more time understanding how the scanline renderer worked, which was no doubt the purpose of the assignment, you'd have had a much better result. Believe it or not, understanding how a basic renderer works will actually help you use VRay and other more modern renderers even better. After all, studios need people who truly understand what they're doing, not button pushers.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #25
One of my professors would show up to class late because he had been in the copy room making 20+ copies of tutorials that he had printed from the internet. Then proceed to hand them out to everyone and tell us to go ahead and follow them step by step. Then he would leave the room. I'm not exaggerating at all, it was at the Art Institute of Atlanta.
 
Old 04 April 2011   #26
Hold on a sec, I somehow missed this post:

Originally Posted by Verinince: I ripped him from the AVP game and enhanced his materials and such and rendered him in Vray. I'm currently working on rigging him.


So you've stolen copyrighted work, basically. You're out of here. Thread closed. You have a hell of a lot to learn about this field if you think it's acceptable to steal artwork from a game and use it for yourself. This is a professional website with professional ethics and this kind of brazen behaviour is not tolerated here.
 
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